Learning Studio Workshop in using Digital & Social Media for Teaching and Learning -17.00-19.00 Thursday June 7th

What: Learning Studio Workshop in using Digital and Social Media for Teaching and Learning

Where: Room M401, on the 4th floor of  the Media Block, London College of Communication

When: 17.00-19.00 Thursday June 7th

If you plan to attend or would like more information about the workshop or the Learning Studio please e-mail Paul Lowe at p.lowe@lcc.arts.ac.uk

The Learning Studio is a community of practice (CoP) around learning technology use in Art, Design and Media within UAL. It is open to anyone to join and participate, whatever your role or current use or experience of learning technology.

The Learning Studio is holding an informal Bar Camp (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BarCamp) style workshop on using digital and social media for teaching and learning from 17.00-19.00 on Thursday June 7th in M401 in the Media Block at LCC. There will be hands on activities and demos on things like blogs, social networks, the DIAL project, and a presentation of the new drupal based collaborative research portal on the Vietnam War, NAM. All are aimed at non-expert users. If you want to contribute to the workshop and talk about something that you are using in your own practice, please do so. You can just turn up and talk about something that you have worked on, or email us in advance and we can facilitate a space for you. There will be a range of activities, and the approach is very informal – there are no formal presentations, instead colleagues will be talking about how they are using a variety of approaches in their teaching and learning. There is also no formal schedule, so you can turn up when you like – colleagues will be demonstrating their activities in different parts of the room.

We will wrap up with a group discussion led by Paul Lowe on how Open Educational Resources can be used in courses.

If you want to participate as a presenter please feel free to do so, if you want to just turn up on the day and talk about something relevant that is also fine. If you need any extra kit – like a laptop, sound, plasma screen etc – then let us know in advance.

In the spirit of Bar Camp, there will be cake and pop.

Look forward to seeing you there, Paul

Paul Lowe

Course Director

MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography London College of Communication Elephant and Castle London SE1 6SB email p.lowe@lcc.arts.ac.uk

 

 

Posted in #UALbestpractice, Communities of Practice, Development and Learning training, Dissemination | Leave a comment

DIAL project update: Strategic Development SMT 22 May 12

DIAL project update: Project manager Chris Follows Strategic Development SMT 22 May 12

DIAL presentation to the Strategic Development SMT.

Project

The DIAL project (Digital Integration into Arts Learning)

Programme

Funding

Dates

Two year JISC funded digital literacies (DL) programme100k plus matched funding (duration: <24> months)Project start date: Nov 2011, (Programme July 11 – 4 months behind schedule) Project completion date:) Nov 2013 (Completion) July 2013 (final report due)

Websites

DIAL blog http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/process.arts http://process.arts.ac.uk/

Project Plan

http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/project-plan/
 
Milestones: M1 setup (project, team and groups) M2 (Group content spaces on process.arts) M3 (Group as projects/plans) M4 (Engage with industry/sector partner) M5 (long term integration with UAL webspace/environment) M6 (Year 1 Evaluation Report) M7 (Sustainability)

DIAL Objectives http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/02/10/objectives/

Objectives: Institutional (Selected for discussion for this meeting)

  • Embed DIAL networks and digital literacies developments into UAL web environment, policies and practices.
  • Define, debate and test impact of new institutional terms, definitions and policies including: flexible learning, digital citizenship, digital literacy/capability and open education.
Objectives: Staff
  • Improved flexible approaches to CPD & PPD staff development
  • Support the implementation of digitally enhanced learning & practice
Objectives Students:
  • Improved graduate employability by enhancing presentation skills and professional online identities.

 

What makes UAL a forward thinking university in terms of its digital capacity?

  • Methods
  • Policy and strategy
  • Infrastructure
  • Support and professional services
  • Practices
  • Developing capability
  • Cultures and attitudes

Key lessons learned DIAL programme related: (Specific to this meeting)

  • DIAL project or programme? (The DIAL project was always going to be bigger than a project and by acknowledging this and looking at DIAL as a potential UAL programme we can better build a case for developing a UAL wide digital strategy and sustainability plans to develop and maintain progressive digital practice at UAL. So DIAL will run as a programme and do its best to acknowledge as wide a spectrum of issues as possible although it cannot address everything.
  • Ongoing and official baseline report being implemented by UAL across key departments (with DIAL board support)
  • Integration and alignment of UAL fellowships in DIAL related projects
  • New mode of delivery for the PGCert course & courses – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/04/29/e-learning-strategy-group-meeting-elsg-011211/
  • New platform to address Open and Flexible Learning practice at UAL, long term evaluation and reflection on progress (Nov 2013) – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/open-and-flexible-learning
  • Following inclusion of IT (Philip Gourlay) on the DIAL project board and hearing our objectives the DIAL IT representative would like to address and establish a more open presence in UAL to help communicate better their activities, they would also like to pilot improved online resources and more participatory online environments for IT support.

DIAL objectives

DIAL Interim Report – Activities & Progress
1 Baseline report. Identify gaps and best practice in the integration of digitally enhanced learning at UAL Following the JISC baseline, the DIAL project board has agreed to support the development of an official institutional baseline report for its digital provision across all colleges and departments. This will begin with each college developing an open blog to cluster baseline specific information about their college, an Institutional blog will also be developed.
2 Surveys http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/category/survey/ We’re currently running an online DIAL survey. The survey was circulated after the JISC baseline submission given our late project start. The survey was promoted to staff only and has received over 150+ responses. The responses are very detailed and have produced valuable data – http://tinyurl.com/dial-survey
3 Embed DIAL networks and digital literacies developments into UAL web environment, policies and practices DIAL Project Blogand identityE-Learning StrategyGroup meetingsSTAFF & CAREER DEVELOPMENT FORUM See detailsDIAL project board formed including deputy Rector, Dean and key staff – meeting agenda 12/03/12

  • IT & IS would like to address and establish a more open presence in UAL to help communicate more about what there activities, they would also like to pilot improved online resources and more participatory online environments.
  • DIAL project board has agreed to support the development of an official institutional baseline report
4 Develop and encourage more flexible learning opportunities and experiences for staff STAFF & CAREER DEVELOPMENT FORUM See detailsAs part of the DIAL Open educational at UALgroupContent community – Open and Flexible Learning at UAL
6 Increase the involvement of grassroots staff in leading university-wide DL development projects See – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/Specifically: Two successful 2012 Teaching & Professional Fellowship Awards, both projects are aligned closely with DIAL’s objectives and we look forward to working together – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/04/12/teaching-professional-fellowship-awards-2012/UAL Community of Practice (CoP) awards ( Communities of Practice funding to build networks ) – The Learning Studio – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/learning-studio and Drupal UAL – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/drupal-ual
7 Define, debate and test impact of new institutional terms, definitions and policies including: flexible learning, digital citizenship and open education. Evidence in project groups – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/Focus & discussion group meetings – See hereFlexible Learning at UAL– initial thoughtsDIAL Meeting and presentation planed with Strategic Development SMT and Deputy RectorDIAL Will be presenting and participating in a session around digitally enhanced learning on the 29th June at the Forum for Programme Directors and Course Leaders.
8 Introduce and explore notions of flexible learning, open education practice into staff CPD/PPD Flexible Learning at UAL – initial thoughts Open education group – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/category/open-education/
9 DIAL to encourage, support and collaborate with ‘staff led’ fellowships, secondments and projects’ to mutual benefit of the staff involved and the common good. DIAL were involved in the planning and selection process of the UAL Teaching & Professional Fellowship Awards 2012 – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/04/12/teaching-professional-fellowship-awards-2012/
10 Explore and debate relationships between digitally enhanced learning and perceived barriers to progressive practice including online identity, time and skills. Developing your online professional identities – A cross project collaboration between project groups: How we use technology as participatory tool in teaching and promoting the creative student: http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/developing-your-online-professional-identities

  • When and how should student’s set up their Professional Identity?
  • What are the skill sets that employers are looking for from our students?
  • What role is Web 2 technology playing in supporting them/this?
  • How do lecturers who are also artist promote their own practice? (I just thought of this)

This survey has been created in Google Docs. We identified a problem across colleges of departments and courses wanting to evaluate skill level and digital use. Replication and repetition were a problem, several courses and departments are using this data and using the Survey tag field at the bottom so we can filter their data for local analysis.

11 Carry out interventions and case studies that enquire and inform change and development in individual practice and student engagement and that have potential to initiate course level curriculum change. In progress – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/
12 Integrate DIAL initiatives and resources with the new Student Enterprise & Employability Service (SEE), bringing together the work of Creative Careers, the Enterprise Centre for the Creative Arts (ECCA), Artquest, Own-it and ArtsTemps. Enterprise and employability in the curriculum – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/enterprise-and-employability-curriculumSix students in Six colleges. The DIAL project is piloting different feedback methods (successful student led survey) – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/01/24/dial-researcher-field-worker-pilot/
13 representation online skills to create and present professional self; including online presentation skills, personal website development and online professional identities. Developing your online professional identities – A cross project collaboration between project groups: How we use technology as participatory tool in teaching and promoting the creative student: http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/developing-your-online-professional-identities

  1. When and how should student’s set up their Professional Identity?
  2. What are the skill sets that employers are looking for from our students?
  3. What role is Web 2 technology playing in supporting them/this?
  4. How do lecturers who are also artist promote their own practice?

Feedback notes from Enterprise week session: ‘Sharing knowledge improve and develop professional identities’

This survey has been created in Google Docs. We identified a problem across colleges of departments and courses wanting to evaluate skill level and digital use. Replication and repetition were a problem, several courses and departments are using this data and using the Survey tag field at the bottom so we can filter their data for local analysis.

14 Explore UAL networked online communities within the university and the potential for national and international collaboration from courses, colleges, disciplines, industry and wider sectors. Introduction of interest groups and open login to allow UAL and outside UAL participation and online collaboration – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/what-are-project-groups
15 Enhance student understanding of digitally enhanced learning within the context of flexible learning. In progress – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/
16 Develop confidence and capability to practice more flexible learning approaches In progress – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/
17 Improve perspectives, engagement and understanding of online learning resources. In progress – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/

 

Posted in DIAL updates, Dissemination, Senior Management and Strategy | Tagged | 1 Comment

Defining UAL’s strengths

I’ve been thinking  about UAL’s strengths as a provider of Arts Higher and Further education, and apart from the obvious (our size, the range of specialisms in one university, being in London, and the amazing students and staff we attract from all over the globe because of those factors), I came up with three things: industry links, collaboration, and digital developments.

I’ve been thinking a lot about those three factors, since student enterprise and employability came into my portfolio of responsibilities, since successfully bidding for the DIAL project and obviously working closely for the last six years with UAL’s elearning team, and since undertaking a survey of practices relating to assessing team work.

I’d say UAL has a claim to be emerging as a sector leader in all three fields – we did pretty well in the Times Higher student experience survey in April 2012 for ‘good industry connections’, 11th after the likes of Imperial, Oxford and Surrey.  Our students say they really value being taught by practitioners, and placements and industry sponsored projects and awards are prominent in our provision.  We have many courses which are structured around collaborative working: I’m chairing the final stage of the validation of the MA in Collaborative Performance tomorrow, which focuses on collaboration as a key way of working, and we have excellent examples of group assessment all over the university.  Finally, our focus on the visual component in our learning technologies makes us distinctive, and of interest in a context where text has often prevailed to the detriment of all learning, not just that relating to visual disciplines.  Our work on Open Educational Practice is also starting to be recognised as sector leading and of international interest.

Continuing to explore and develop these three areas will be good for UAL students who will benefit from excellent practice and leading edge developments, and exciting for the staff involved, as well as good for their careers in the long term.  The three combined arguably give UAL a distinctive profile which cannot easily be replicated – and help us answer the question, ‘are we famous for something other than being the largest provider of art and design education’ with conviction and a sense of eagerness and hope for what the future brings.

Posted in Baselining, Communities of Practice, DIAL updates, National debate, Open education (group), Profile & identity, Senior Management and Strategy, Uncategorized, University Strategy | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

DIAL project 2-minute video update

A video overview of the DIAL (Digital Integration into Arts Learning) project part of the JISC Developing Digital Literacies programme – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/

The video can be downloaded via process.arts – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/dial-project-2-minute-video-update

The DIAL project (Digital Integration into Arts Learning) a two year JISC funded digital literacies (DL) project at University of the arts London (UAL). The DIAL project aims to address improved graduate employability and cultural change by developing confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students.

The DIAL project will encourage ‘open’ communities of practice and explore key issues surrounding the development of digitally enhanced learning.

Posted in DIAL updates, Dissemination | Leave a comment

DIAL Interim Report – Outcomes and Lessons Learned – April 2012

Outline any changes to practice brought about or influenced by the activities described in section two or by use of the deliverables described in section three.

Project related:

  • DIAL project or programme? (The DIAL project was always going to be bigger than a project and by acknowledging this and looking at DIAL as a potential UAL programme we can better build a case for developing a UAL wide digital strategy and sustainability plans to develop and maintain progressive digital practice at UAL. So DIAL will run as a programme and do its best to acknowledge as wide a spectrum of issues as possible although it can not address everything.
  • Ongoing and official baseline report being implemented by UAL across key departments (with DIAL board support)
  • Integration and alignment of UAL fellowships in DIAL related projects
  • New mode of delivery for the PGCert course – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/04/29/e-learning-strategy-group-meeting-elsg-011211/
  • New platform to address Open and Flexible Learning practice at UAL, long term evaluation and reflection on progress (Nov 2013) – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/open-and-flexible-learning
  • Following inclusion of IT on the DIAL project board and hearing our objectives the DIAL IT representative would like to address and establish a more open presence in UAL to help communicate better their activities, they would also like to pilot improved online resources and more participatory online environments for IT support.

Outline lessons learned so far as the result of your baseline process and any other activities undertaken towards evaluation (section 4). Please include a summary of the findings of your baseline report. Include a link or provide a summary of any evidence that can support these lessons. 

Summary of the findings of your baseline report

The DIAL project was very timely in many ways for the University of the Arts London. The baseline helped highlight the degree of change it will be experiencing over the next two years across all of its key digital infrastructures. These include a new VLE from blackboard to moodle, its IT provision and a total overall of its web environment. UAL has also been involved in the JISC phase 2 and 3 UKOER programmes and has been trialing new online assessment and curriculum delivery support tools.  Although the UAL has acknowledged and is addressing these problems its also encouraged a culture of DIY course delivery and grassroots innovation which has produced a rich environment that’s siloed and hidden from view, there is a huge lack of openness, interaction and communication across courses, departments and colleges. Feedback from student surveys suggest students would like everything in one place, ideally a VLE that worked, this would making better use of both worlds, encouraging grassroots digital online innovation and embedding these into a new VLE.

Although staff development and training at UAL is of very high quality, there is a distinct lack of flexible/open/online learning opportunities for staff to learn and practice at a time and place of their choosing or in collaboration with others. Offering better flexible learning opportunities could also help address some of the issues that UALs time poor and busy staff face. The introduction of Lynda.com has had a huge impact on staff and students and has highlighted the need for more flexible options for staff and students. A review of the extent of flexible learning at UAL also highlighted the low level of flexible learning opportunities being offered to students. It’s hoped by improving the open and flexible staff learning opportunities this will also have a positive impact on the student experience as the benefits and first hand experiences of staff are past into curriculum design.

IT competencies. The University has revised its basic IT competencies, those skills that all users of a computer at the University need to have. You should be able to check your own skill level by printing off the skills assessment questionnaire http://my.arts.ac.uk/learn-it/2whatweoffer.htm), general policy and documentation is unclear and confusing. These competencies may be seen as having little relevance to practice based competencies, software creative applications etc. Some staff access the competencies of their students those that do, do it their way, there is no formal processes or standardisation for this in place. Students were asked ‘should UAL evaluate digital skill levels of staff and students?’ Opinion was divided 50/50, some students felt there is enough assessment and they don’t want to endure more others thought it a good idea for those who could benefit (so maybe it should be offered as optional?) There was a strong consensus throughout the feedback that staff should be assessed and better trained in this area.

  • The baseline report, student survey feedback and focus group meetings all highlighted student’s need for improved professional web skills in order to better represent and operate online in a professional context.
  • Student surveys helped inform the development of the project overview – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/02/10/project-overview/
  • Following the JISC baseline, the DIAL project board has agreed to support the development of an official institutional baseline report for its digital provision across all colleges and departments. This will begin with each college developing an open blog to cluster baseline specific information about their college, an Institutional blog will also be developed.
  •  Outline how these findings will inform the project going forward. Do you have any updates to the technologies you plan to work with at: http://prod.cetis.ac.uk/search.php?search=developing+digital+literacies 
  • DIAL on process.arts to manage content communities – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/discipline/research-practice/dial

Lesson’s learned project related:

We are piloting a DIAL work package brief for groups to communicate and compile their outputs (running funded groups as mini projects) – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1qVtyAbhABw2b2QoP7eDutiqOEoI0hcBCBpJo097IWjw/edit. Each group is running independently and at a pace that is compatible and complementary to their day to day practice. The work package brief will be adapted based on feedback and offered to new groups if they wish to use it to report or as a guide to use for reference. DIAL ‘Projects’ have the potential to allow staff and student new to project management to gain experience with a small project. Please see – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/03/27/introduction-project-management-dial-open-education-at-ual-case-studies/

Lesson’s learned projects:

Lessons learned about literacies for online reflective practice (Notes below from Lindsay Jordan – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/04/28/online-reflective-practice-group-update/ )

Introducing online reflection as a compulsory element of a course has led to the development of the following elements of participants’ digital literacy:

  • Understanding the benefits and challenges of online reflective practice – as evidenced in terminal reflective assignments and ongoing exchange of feedback with participants.
  • Understanding the attitudes and approaches required to maximise the benefits of online reflective practice – as evidenced in the self and peer assessments.
  • Willingness to try new tools and processes – as evidenced on the blogs. Seeing group members posting images and videos often prompted participants to try this for themselves and/or ask each other for advice and support.
  • Willingness to find the answers oneself – whereas at the start of the course I would receive requests for assistance before a participant had even tried to find any information, by the end the requests I received were much more specific; participants had tried a number of avenues and had come to me as a last resort.
  • Greater tolerance of complexity – several participants who felt in the early stages that the course requirements were overwhelmingly complex seemed much more comfortable about the requirements in the latter stages. Four months in, we found we had to ask everyone to start logging in with their new student IDs to access their feedback, whereas we had assured them previously that they would be able to use their existing staff IDs. The response to this was nowhere near as negative as we expected – people seemed to just get on with it.
  • Tool-specific knowledge – e.g. how to add and edit blog posts and comments, how to create blog groups and subscribe to new posts, how to upload media and create hyperlinks.

Next steps

The next phase will be to look more deeply at the data from the tasks, the assessments, and from forthcoming surveys and interviews, to get a better understanding of the role of compulsory, course-based online reflective activities in developing particular aspects of participants’ digital literacy. It will be important to contact colleagues who deferred their studies to gain a better understanding of the factors that influenced their decision. I’m not anticipating that this information will be of much use (previous studies have shown that withdrawing students often cite external pressures and are unlikely to connect their attrition with course design, student support, etc..), but it’s worth a shot. One strategy may be to ask them to speculate what they would have found most challenging had the external pressures (work, family etc.) not been as significant. My major concern is that the online reflective activities were actually a little too challenging, and that this contributed to participant withdrawal and delayed engagement. If this is the case, I need to identify how best to address this; through greater applicant awareness, longer participant induction, different support structures, etc..

I am also interested in looking at the other end of the spectrum; those participants who are now continuing to engage in online reflective practice through their blogs now the units have ended. What are their motivations for doing this and how did these come about? Was it a particular aspect of the course that helped them over a particular threshold, and is this something that can be developed, or given more emphasis, for future cohorts? Was it a particular experience they had, and can this be replicated for others?

Video Presentation Skills group (Draft notes from Laura North below https://docs.google.com/document/d/1vrTfQYJ9XRAw5CLvFb2gNQMJFL0rk984YQ3FuKKCI0g/edit )

A key area that I felt needed more work was structure and content. Really structuring the content and knowing the key elements of your project is important to ensure the message is conveyed in this short period of time. An exercise where they have to practice their pitch and ensure that they are communicating the key elements could be built into the next workshop.

Areas requiring support

Need store(s) of video cameras for use on courses

Staff training with using Flips or smartphones for videoing – it is straightforward and if staff experience this then they may be far more inclined to work with video. Perhaps as part of Learn-IT/CLTAD, and as part of the halfday event we are organising

Open education at UAL

OER creation is a very good diagnostic tool to evaluate digital Literacy requirements for individuals and institutions. (details to follow and will be updated – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/category/open-education/ )

Key lessons from staff feedback form focus groups and meetings:

  • Let people know what to do and how to do OER at UAL
  • Open at UAL baseline – what is it like now. unconnected, no overall strategy, variable resources and responsibilities, specialist.
  • What it will be like, strategy and sustainable model, clear direction for UAL , Institutional shift ‘cultural change’

Please highlight any outcomes/lessons which are confidential (that you don’t want to be shared with the wider community through the JISC website) and require further discussion.  

Highlight any accessibility issues which have emerged and how you have addressed them in the project.

Extra staff resources

  • Speed up project support, processes and progress and reduce project management workload (approached project Director arrangements made to find/offer support)

Web development support (Online places for DIAL projects and communities to live)

  • There was no allocation in the original budget for DIAL networked project web space this will result in extra cost to the DIAL budget.  We were looking to develop bespoke web space.  We are now using/adapting to in-house resources using minimal funds – http://process.arts.ac.uk/

Equipment availability for project group use, working on funding for digital equipment packs for projects.

  • DIAL pilot groups and community are identifying equipment needs in order to practice and pilot there ideas and communities, for example mobile video cameras, software (screen capture) and iPads, the budget includes costs for supporting communities although some groups may need equipment and limited within the DIAL group budgets. (approached project Director arrangements made to find/offer support, was discussed at the ‘Information Strategy Steering Group’ meeting existing resources to be sourced and DIAL budget to fund some essential equipment packs.
Posted in Interim Report, Senior Management and Strategy | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

JISC Digital Literacies programme: A history of Digital Literacy in UK & EU #JISCDigLit

Great (simple) definition of digital literacies:

Not about using particular technologies, but about particular practices that we want students [and staff!] to use and allowing them to find the tools. [How do we support them in doing so?]

A components model:
http://digital-fingerprint.co.uk/2012/05/jisc-digital-literacies-programme-a-history-of-digital-literacy-in-uk-eu-jiscdiglit/

See full set of slides here – http://digital-fingerprint.co.uk/2012/05/jisc-digital-literacies-programme-a-history-of-digital-literacy-in-uk-eu-jiscdiglit/

Posted in JISC events, National debate | Leave a comment

DIAL are hiring! myblog.arts blogger/researchers and/or drupal users

The DIAL project are looking for students or staff who are confident myblog.arts bloggers and/or drupal users for minimum of 6 days each, to be employed via ArtsTemps (from May to Sept, some weekdays, evenings, weekends and work from home optional, occasional college visits may be necessary).

Interested? Please contact ArtsTemps ( http://www.ualartstemps.co.uk/ArtsLondon/index.asp ) or Chris Follows at c.follows@arts.ac.uk please provide a short introduction and say why you would be interested in working on the projects below also please include links to online activity you are currently involved in.

If you have any extra skills in the digital domain and would like to be considered for future DIAL projects then please also include these too.

Myblog.arts blogger/researchers

DIAL recently compiled a basic baseline report ( http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/dial-ual-baseline-report ); the report was a quick snapshot overview of where we are as a university in addressing our digital capacity. We are now looking to create a more in-depth baseline report for each college and would like this to be a true, open and fully inclusive overview of our current situation. We would like to explore how we at UAL are integrating with the ‘digital’ in all aspects of our college lives, addressing our anxieties, fears as well as exposing our problems and celebrating our achievements.

We are looking for blogger researchers to work across colleges and help create a dynamic blogs, spark debate, compile, publish and manage baseline information, we aim to run 6 digital baseline college blogs, one for each college, you will be responsible for running multiple blogs.

Drupal/web developers (any level) to help champion and support the development of UALs new in-house drupal community and support our hack days

Drupal UAL a new open source web development community of practice at UAL

This project aims to encourage and develop a new open support network for UAL staff and students to explore, experiment and share ideas and knowledge of using and developing Drupal web environments and projects.

We are looking for drupal/web developers (any level) to help champion and support the development of UALs in house drupal community and support our hack days. Join in and read more here: http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/drupal-ual

Interested: We will be offering occasional work days to support this project, if interested please join the drupal UAL community and add yourself to the contacts list on the process.arts group, let us know your interested in helping out !

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Web Literacy Skills

Thought this work by Mozilla is very inline with the DIAL objectives.

http://erinknight.com/ ………prepare people for participation and contribution in today’s (and tomorrow’s) digital society and global economy. Webmaking skills can set up an approach to life in general that fosters not only looking-under-the-hood, embracing failure, tinkering and remixing, but also participation, citizenship and action. These are not just life skills but ultimately a way of approaching life.

For more please see What is webmaking? – http://erinknight.com/post/17966967241/what-is-webmaking

The Mozilla Learning team are defining a set of core web literacy skills and developing learning pathways for people to develop and hone these skills. Our goals are to develop and empower more webmakers by providing them with the opportunity to learn making by making. This work is leveraging all of the great momentum, tools and content built through Hackasaurus. –https://wiki.mozilla.org/Learning

Summer Campaign 2012 – https://wiki.mozilla.org/Summer_Campaign_2012

We’re building a generation of webmakers. First step: invite people everywhere to MEET up to MAKE something cool and LEARN how the code behind the web works. It’s called the Summer Code Party and it starts June 23rd.

Mozilla and dozens of others orgs are getting together to make this happen. Here’s how you join in:

1. MEET with friends or go to an event.
2. MAKE something cool on the web.
3. LEARN how the web gets made.

Wiki – https://teachwebmaking.mozillalabs.com/index.php/Main_Page#Who_is_this_website_for.3F

Posted in Digital PAT, JISC events, Support tools, Technology trends | 1 Comment

Self Regulated Learning

This course concentrates on the role of Self Regulated learning (SRL) and has been produced by the Responsive Open Learning Environments (ROLE) project. Overall, the ROLE project provides tools and services that enable learners to build their own technology-enhanced learning environment based on their needs and preferences.

Course outline: http://labspace.open.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=7898&topic=all 

Time: 3 hours

Level: Introductory

The Responsive Open Learning Environment (ROLE) project is a European funded initiative that has been established to research and explore a variety of tools and services that enable learners to build their own technology-enhanced learning environment based on their needs and preferences.

This course provides an overview of the concepts behind Self Regulated Learning (SRL) and also offers an opportunity to use a selection of learning tools that have been developed by the ROLE project.

For a quick overview and an introduction to SRL, have a look at the following video:

Posted in Self Regulated Learning | Tagged | Leave a comment

Preparation for the video presentation skills workshops

We did some preparation for the video presentation skills workshops with a group of Fashion Entrepreneurship MA students from LCF, run in conjunction with Chitra Buckley, course leader, DIAL and SEE.

In order to prepare, they were given a brief in advance. They were asked to create a one-minute video pitch about something that they were working on, a project or something they were passionate about. Our initial idea had been that they would present on their MA project outline, but it was slightly too early in the process as they were all in the early stages of developing their plans. They had all thought about the content of their video pitch in advance.

Research from my Fellowship showed that students found it easier to do presentations if they were in a supportive informal environment. Chitra Buckley, course leader, developed an informal atmosphere, where everyone seemed comfortable giving feedback (even though I was filming at the same time).

We asked them to fill in some questions at the beginning. They were:

Have you ever created a short video promoting yourself or your project?

5 out of 6 answered No

How confident do you feel about doing the video?

  • Somehow confident
  • Confident
  • Not too confident
  • No not very confident (worried about how I will look like)
  • Confident

If you haven’t done this before, what has stopped you?

  • Time, not had the opportunity
  • Don’t like to see/hear myself recorded
  • Never really felt the need to and don’t have the technical skills required – would love to though Never needed it before
  • Never required it and felt a bit conscious

Give one word that expresses how you feel about it

  • Useful
  • Experimental
  • Embarrassed
  • Intrigued
  • Fear/Embarrassment
  • Great

Read more about the first workshop in Workshop 1, part 1 – filming one minute video pitches without training.

Go back to Video presentation skills workshops – an overview.

Posted in DIAL pilot Groups, presentations skills (group) | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Workshop 1, part 2 – watching the video pitches on a big screen

This blog post follows on from Workshop 1, part 1 – filming one minute video pitches without training, where the students practiced recording a one minute pitch using Flip cameras.

We then had a group feedback session where participants discussed their feelings about making presentations to camera, and discussed how they were finding the process so far.

After everyone had created their one minute video pitches, we scheduled a break while I uploaded the videos to the computer. With the Flip, it’s very easy as there is a built in USB (see video that shows how to upload). If you use a smartphone (eg iPhone, Android phone, Blackberry etc) then you will need a USB cable in order to upload the video.

We then played back each of the videos on the big screen.

Each person had a feedback sheet with the following categories for feedback:

  • Body Language
  • Content
  • Confidence
  • Voice/delivery

We briefed the group to use the criticism sandwich: give positive feedback, followed by anything they could improve on, followed by positive feedback. Again this tapped into research from my Fellowship showed that students found it easier to do presentations if they were in a supportive informal environment. Eg, “I was really impressed by how confident and naturally you came across. It would be great if you were able to slow down a bit so the audience has time to understand all the points. I think you communicated your key messages really clearly.” It can be demoralising for people to only receive negative feedback, eg “You’re too quiet, and you need to speak up”, especially if they are nervous.

The partners gave initial feedback. And then also wrote their feedback on a sheet. The group then joined in and did a crit for each video.

The feedback was very supportive and mainly positive. We should ask the group to also be explicit about how the videos could be improved, to ensure that more critical feedback is included as it is not always easy for people to deliver critical feedback for fear of hurting people’s feelings.

The videos were, overall, very natural. There was not a lot of rehearsal involved and the speaking to camera in a relaxed atmosphere in one take produced something that demonstrated their energy and personalities. Most were quite confident, some were more expressive off video. It is possible that over-training or preparation around the videos could decrease this energy.

In terms of technical skills, everyone managed to use the Flips without problem. Training around uploading, editing and posting to YouTube or Vimeo etc is likely to be necessary. Getting the right distance from the person (whether too close or too far) is a consideration, and a couple were potentially distracted by the time reminders from their partners, though it kept them to time, and knowing exactly when to start and finish the video.

A key area that I felt needed more work was structure and content. Really structuring the content and knowing the key elements of your project is important to ensure the message is conveyed in this short period of time. An exercise where they have to practice their pitch and ensure that they are communicating the key elements could be built into the next workshop.

The next blog post will be about the second workshop, Workshop 2, part 1 – training on how to do a video elevator pitch, where we are showing participants how to do a video elevator pitch successfully, in association with SEE and the SEED Fund, which requires a one-minute video pitch as part of the application process in order to receive up to £5k funding for a business idea.

Go back to Video presentation skills workshops – an overview.

Posted in presentations skills (group) | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Workshop 1, part 1 – filming one minute video pitches without training

The first stage of the workshop with Fashion Entrepreneurship MA students from LCF took place on Wednesday 25 April at High Holborn, in the lecture theatre.


There were 6 participants, all female. My first impression was that this was a group of students who were, for the most part, fairly comfortable with being in front of a camera.

Chitra Buckley, the course leader, started off the workshop by explaining what an elevator pitch was.

The group then split into pairs, taking it in turns to video their partner’s elevator pitch.

We were in the big lecture hall at High Holborn so it was quiet and big enough for all three pairs to stay in the same room and record their clips at the same time.

Each had a Flip video camera between the pair. Some also had smartphones, but all chose to use the Flip cameras.

The Flip cameras are easy to use – just a big red button for record. (See this video on how to use a Flip or this video on how to use the Flip mino, a newer model. Unfortunately Flips are no longer being made, but there are alternatives.) There seemed to be no issues with using the Flip cameras. The only question from one of the participants was how to skip between video clips.

Doing a single take in one minute also reduces the need for video editing, which can be time-consuming and which needs additional skills and software, though there are some decent programmes, such as iMovie on the Mac. Flip also provides some basic software editing.

The pairs discussed the content of their pitches to start with before starting recording.

Each pair decided to record several takes of their video pitches. One of the participants commented that their partner’s first attempt was better as it was more natural and unforced.

All of them decided to time their videos, so they stuck to the one minute limit.

The next blog post, Workshop 1, part 2 – watching the video pitches on a big screen, describes the second part of the workshop, where we had a group feedback discussion on the process so far, and then watched the video pitches on a big screen and gave feedback.

Go back to Video presentation skills workshops – an overview.

Posted in presentations skills (group) | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Mozilla and web literacies webinar

Mozilla and web literacies webinar as part of the JISC Developing Digital Literacies programme.

The recording and chat transcript from the session is now available via the JISC e-Learning programmes blog:

http://elearningprogs.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/04/30/recording-mozilla-and-web-literacies

Posted in JISC events | Tagged , | 2 Comments

DIAL WORK PACKAGE

DIAL WORK PACKAGE- (DIAL-workpackage-nov-12DOWNLOAD) ­

Project start date: Nov 2011

Project completion date: Nov 2013

Duration: <24> months

Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | Leave a comment

E-Learning Strategy Group Meeting ELSG 01/12/11

E-Learning Strategy Group Meeting

Minutes  (DIAL related only) from the last ELSG held on 1st December 2011. in the Large Board Room, High Holborn

Present: David Bracegirdle, Jan Conway, Jess Crilly, Angus Eason, Kevin Garner, Marc Griffith, Paul Lowe, Ruth Powell, Nancy Turner (Chair), Charlotte Webb (Clerk), Ben Westhead

Apologies: Ellen Sims, Andrew Scheiner, Glyn Whittle, Jo Morrison, Pete Maloney, Dereck Harris

DIAL – Chris Follows presented to the group

4.3 Digital Integration into Arts Learning (DIAL) (Chris Follows)

·     This is a two-year project, funded by JISC. Chris has been appointed project manager.

·     DIAL will engage self-identified communities across UAL who would like to improve their digital literacy.

·     It was noted that ‘digital literacy’ means different things in different contexts.

·     The evaluation of digital tools is important for the project. Their effective use can have a strong impact on academic liaison and student induction.

Posted in ELSG | 2 Comments

What does open educational practice mean to you?

We had our forth ‘open education at UAL drop-in/focus group session at WCA 26/04/2012 following on from previous sessions at (CSM, LCF and CCAD) the sessions are part of a CLTAD project collaboration between ALTO and DIAL. We will announce further dates for meetings at Camberwell and LCC very soon and be running a lunchtime webinar. If you would like us to visit your college again or visit a specific course to talk about the implications of open education then please contact Chris – c.follows@arts.ac.uk

We kicked off the meeting by asking participants ‘what open education or open educational practice meant to them’ we were fortunate to have a good cross section of views and experience. We had some critical debate around the issues of openness, which was really useful for progressing the debate. It would be good to try and engage and encourage more critical debate in future meetings to help address the core concerns of open education/open practice. I feel is important that we’re (ALTO, CLTAD & DIAL) are not seen as promoting or pushing people into open education but seen as supporting the imminent transition into openness for everyone. The open educational movement is already in danger of becoming an elite network of specialists who advocate ‘openness’ and are rarely self critical of the movement and like many technological movements there is a danger of becoming too specialised and advanced which could marginalise the critical voice.

Here’s a rough breakdown of the discussion, I couldn’t capture everything as I was typing and talking at the same time, we only really asked the first question ‘What does open educational practice mean to you?’ I have created the other questions based on the general flow of the discussion and could use these in future focus groups.

OEP in Practice

Read more: http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/what-does-open-educational-practice-mean-you

Read more: http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/what-does-open-educational-practice-mean-you

Posted in Dissemination, Open education (group) | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Online Reflective Practice group: Update

As the two core PG Cert units draw to a close, it’s an ideal time to look back at the online reflection that colleagues have participated in as part of the course. I’ll report on the outcomes first and then the process:

Outcomes

All those completing the first unit engaged to a satisfactory extent with the online reflective tasks, with the vast majority engaging at a high level. The tasks, with links to examples of posts and comments, are detailed here. Participation in the reflective tasks was measured through self and peer assessment and the spread of grades awarded was interesting; ‘B’ was by far the most commonly awarded grade. There were also several ‘A’s and a few ‘D’s. Hardly any ‘C’s were awarded. This supports my observation that once people began to engage in the tasks, they saw the benefits fairly swiftly and their engagement continued and deepened. The few who obtained ‘D’ grades generally did not engage until it was too late (I’ll post up a couple of graphic representations once I’ve got feedback out to the participants).

The quality of the posts exceeded my expectations. The quality of the comments was also very good, but in many cases these conversations did not take place when they were supposed to. While some groups maintained conversations throughout around the monthly topics, in many cases interactions were sparse until the few days preceding the terminal assessment, when they rose significantly. Some of these comments referred to posts made three or four months previously.

The self and peer assessment of participation demonstrated colleagues’ capacity for honest and constructive assessment of their own and their peers’ engagement in the tasks. It also revealed their understanding of the benefits of online reflection and the attitudes and approaches required to maximise these. The following is an example of anonymous peer feedback exchanged:

I believe that [x] is committed to the subject and is highly reflective, however there were some planning issues which meant I got to read some of the posts quite late. Some of the posts I do feel would have benefited from being a little more concise which would have helped with the articulation of some points. [x] shows a high level of self-direction in his/her blog posts and demonstrates a desire to improve his/her teaching practice throughout.

In terms of the impact online reflective practice has had on learning, I am certain of three things. First, the standard of the terminal assignments submitted for the first unit (i.e. after six months on the course and five day-long workshops), was significantly higher than those submitted by previous cohorts after 12 months on the course and 20 half-day workshops. Essentially, this cohort have achieved more in half the time. Second, in conversation with participants halfway through the unit, many told me that, were it not for the online tasks, they probably would not have read or written anything yet. And third, a small but significant proportion of those who have completed both units are continuing to use their blogs.

Feedback gathered from participants about the online reflective tasks revealed that the vast majority felt they should be retained as a fundamental part of the course. Some participants even felt that we should increase the weighting the tasks have on the unit grade (currently 10%), as such low stakes are disproportionate to the amount of work they put in to completing the tasks. A minority (albeit a significant one) stated a preference for using a less public forum for the tasks, or at least a system with simpler privacy settings.

Process

Although engagement in online reflective practice was high among those who completed the unit, and appeared to enhance learning, participant drop-out/deferral rates were also significant. Minor factors contributing to this include improved flexibility of the programme, which makes it easier for participants to defer one or two units until the following year, and higher than normal redundancies. One major factor was the overlapping scheduling of the first two units, which increased the workload and the complexity of the programme; this has been resolved for 2012/13. Unfortunately it is very difficult to untangle this factor from the increased complexity and greater challenge inherent in the new curriculum. The other major factor was the continuous nature of the online reflective tasks. For the first time, participants were being required to produce something from the outset that would influence their grade for the course. This meant that those who were not engaging as they should were made aware of this – often through informal peer feedback – and forced to be pro-active in arranging deferral rather than waiting until the end of the course to submit a borderline assignment (or not).

Lessons learned about literacies for online reflective practice

Introducing online reflection as a compulsory element of a course has led to the development of the following elements of participants’ digital literacy:

Understanding the benefits and challenges of online reflective practice – as evidenced in terminal reflective assignments and ongoing exchange of feedback with participants.
Understanding the attitudes and approaches required to maximise the benefits of online reflective practice – as evidenced in the self and peer assessments.
Willingness to try new tools and processes – as evidenced on the blogs. Seeing group members posting images and videos often prompted participants to try this for themselves and/or ask each other for advice and support.
Willingness to find the answers oneself – whereas at the start of the course I would receive requests for assistance before a participant had even tried to find any information, by the end the requests I received were much more specific; participants had tried a number of avenues and had come to me as a last resort.
Greater tolerance of complexity – several participants who felt in the early stages that the course requirements were overwhelmingly complex seemed much more comfortable about the requirements in the latter stages. Four months in, we found we had to ask everyone to start logging in with their new student IDs to access their feedback, whereas we had assured them previously that they would be able to use their existing staff IDs. The response to this was nowhere near as negative as we expected – people seemed to just get on with it.
Tool-specific knowledge – e.g. how to add and edit blog posts and comments, how to create blog groups and subscribe to new posts, how to upload media and create hyperlinks.

Next steps

The next phase will be to look more deeply at the data from the tasks, the assessments, and from forthcoming surveys and interviews, to get a better understanding of the role of compulsory, course-based online reflective activities in developing particular aspects of participants’ digital literacy. It will be important to contact colleagues who deferred their studies to gain a better understanding of the factors that influenced their decision. I’m not anticipating that this information will be of much use (previous studies have shown that withdrawing students often cite external pressures and are unlikely to connect their attrition with course design, student support, etc..), but it’s worth a shot. One strategy may be to ask them to speculate what they would have found most challenging had the external pressures (work, family etc.) not been as significant. My major concern is that the online reflective activities were actually a little too challenging, and that this contributed to participant withdrawal and delayed engagement. If this is the case, I need to identify how best to address this; through greater applicant awareness, longer participant induction, different support structures, etc..

I am also interested in looking at the other end of the spectrum; those participants who are now continuing to engage in online reflective practice through their blogs now the units have ended. What are their motivations for doing this and how did these come about? Was it a particular aspect of the course that helped them over a particular threshold, and is this something that can be developed, or given more emphasis, for future cohorts? Was it a particular experience they had, and can this be replicated for others?

 

Posted in Activity & progress, DIAL pilot Groups, DIAL updates, Online Reflective Practice (group) | 4 Comments

My Digital Life – Call for Submissions

UAL students are invited to submit proposals to give a presentation about their digital lives at the 2012 Designs on e-Learning conference hosted by UAL and Penn State University. This is an international conference dedicated to innovations in learning technologies in art and design.

Application deadline: 5.00pm Friday 18th May

We are looking for highly visual and creative six minute presentations that tell us about the unique ways you use the digital in your everyday life: to create, collaborate, research, learn and of course, socialise and have fun.

Successful applicants will have free access to the 3-day conference and be invited to the conference dinner at Shoreditch House. For more information on the brief and how to apply use the QR code below or go to http://myblog.arts.ac.uk/del2012/my-digital-life/

Posted in Profile & identity, Technology trends | Tagged | Leave a comment

UAL experts in the media

This looks interesting in terms of online identity and professional profile, I wonder what constitutes media in this context, as media/publishing is increasingly in hands of anyone ? Its encouraging to see UAL provide an online platform for promoting the profiles of its staff and students, what do you think?

Search for an expert – media-experts.arts.ac.uk

Text below taken from this webpage – http://newsevents.arts.ac.uk/28865/ual-experts-in-the-media/ 

The 24 hour media is hungry for expert comment to bring their reporting to life, and working with the media to provide that comment is one of the key ways in which academics and universities raise the profile of what they do.

A recent example of a UAL academic doing just that is LCC’s Jo Hodges talking to the BBC about branding in the Mayoral election. Jo’s snappy and authoritative comments hugely improve the quality of the report and, crucially, also reinforce LCC’s reputation as a place where leaders in their field are working and teaching; a reputation that is vital to attracting students, industry partnerships and funding.

To capitalise on the benefits that working with the media bring, the University has launched a new searchable Guide to Experts to help journalists find expert comment throughout our Colleges, online at media-experts.arts.ac.uk.

The Guide is updated continually and we are always looking for new experts, so if you are interested in speaking to the media about your area of expertise, please fill in the form at: media-experts.arts.ac.uk/join

You will not be called directly by the media and your contact details will never be given out without your permission, so you will always be able to decline a request to speak to the media if you are too busy or unsure that you want to talk about a particular topic.

If you want further information about the Guide or any other aspect of working with the media, pleasecontact the Press Office.

Posted in National debate, Profile & identity | Tagged | 1 Comment

STAFF & CAREER DEVELOPMENT FORUM 22/02/2012

Dial were invited to present at the STAFF & CAREER DEVELOPMENT FORUM 22nd February, 14:00 attended by the deputy Rector and key UAL staff.

The following notes from the meeting with recommendations below:

Discussion item – DIAL update lead by Chris Follows

Background: The DIAL project (Digital Integration into Arts Learning) is a two year JISC funded digital literacies (DL) project at University of the Arts London. The DIAL project aims to address improved graduate employability and cultural change by developing confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students. Over the last three months we have seen the introduction of the UAL DIAL blog (http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/about-dial/) and further development of the project plan. An initial ‘base-lining’ exercise has been carried out via a series of workshops and discussions at enterprise week, producing a snapshot of the current digital landscape from as many perspectives as possible. Flexible learning offerings include desk learning and post course support e.g. online videos and recorded tutorials. The project will be looking to embed DIAL activities into practice as much as possible. The project will provide the funding and potential to run 16 concurrent projects within UAL. Individuals and groups are invited to come forward with proposals and should be willing to take on board and develop them as a project. The first major project is taking shape and in total 4 groups are now committed to establishing UAL projects. A list of the current projects can be found at: http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/

Other elements of the project will look at graduate employability and how students can present themselves professionally, and should the University evaluate digital skill levels for both students and staff.

It is essential that the DIAL project continues as an ongoing programme, beyond the initial two year funding, becoming part of the way we do things.

–     Discussion around the assessment of staff capability at UAL

–     Discussion around methods of measuring/self-assessment competencies

–     Discussion about the development of individual staff profiles based on the principle of a one-stop-shop. Information feeds into other systems and the requirement to update happens only once.

–     Suggestion that Chris Follows could present to College & Service SMTs and potentially Program Directors and key academic groups.

–     It was suggested that teams should look at projects that could benefit from digital activities.

–     Discuss with Neil Henderson the potential collaboration and benefits to the SICOM project.

 

 

Posted in Development and Learning training, Dissemination, Meeting notes, Senior Management and Strategy | Tagged | 1 Comment

Digital Literacy – delivering the agenda within colleges and universities

In the sixth episode of our online radio programmes – JISC On Air – we are exploring how universities and colleges can help teaching staff, researchers, support and administrative staff to develop their digital literacies – those capabilities which prepare an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society. In part two of the show, we will be looking at how digital literacy underpins the academic success and employability of students.

The show highlights how colleges and universities are developing holistic approaches and strategies for supporting the development of these skills and capabilities.

Kim Catcheside interviews staff working on the Digidol Project at Cardiff University hearing more about how the project is establishing an institution-wide approach for contextualising and embedding digital literacy into the development of academic staff, students, research students and administrative, managerial and support staff.

In the show Kim also speaks with Dr Andrew Eynon who is leading the Personal Actualisation and Development through Digital Literacies in Education project at Coleg Llandrillo. The overarching aim of this project is to create a digitally literate, skilled and confident workforce and student body across all the FE institutions in North Wales (Coleg Harlech, Coleg Menai, Coleg Llandrillo, Deeside College and Yale College Wrexham).

Helen Beetham, synthesis consultant for the JISC Developing Digital Literacies programme, and who has extensive experience of this topic, provides valuable insights into the emerging issues from the programme, whilst Alison Mitchell, Deputy Director of Vitae, speaks about the importance of digital literacies for researchers.

For further information on JISC’s work in this area visit:

www.jisc.ac.uk/developingdigitalliteracies

To follow the ongoing developments of the JISC funded Developing Digital Literacies projects visit the Netvibes page which collates all the project blog postings and subscribe to the Developing Digital Literacies programme blog for up to date information about the developments in the programme.

Join the JISC-DIGLIT-PUBLIC mailing list – http://bit.ly/HUDj6n to contribute to discussions around digital literacies and how it affects your institution.

Posted in JISC events, National debate | Leave a comment

Digital literacies blog post by Grainne Conole

Blog post by Grainne Conole from the School of Education at Plymouth University on the 18th April 2012. http://e4innovation.com/?p=575  – Conclusion…… This post has explored the types of digital literacies that are needed by learners, teachers and researchers to exploit the potential of new technologies and to enable them to connect and communicate in a plethora of ways. The digital literacies needed are far more participatory and interactive, the distributed network of others that we connect with is as important as the way in which we access and use information on the Internet. We each need to identify our own digital voice and identity, how we want to be perceived and how we want to interact with others. Used effectively social and participatory media offer a powerful means of us communicating and developing our ideas.

Posted in National debate | Leave a comment

Open Education Week at the UAL

John Casey’s notes below summarise of our previous OER drop-in session. Our Critical friend Carole Baume joined the meeting, was really refreshing to have external participation in the debate, Carole proposed the interesting idea of ‘OER buddies’ John mentions in the notes below. Action to self: Followup on those outcomes! I attened the UAL drawing conference and hopeful building some connections with the UAL/OER drawing community. – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/drawing-out-2012-friday-highlights

Open Education Week at the UAL by John Casey {accessed 13/04/2012} Had a great meeting at Central Saint Martins Art College yesterday to mark open education week and kick of a series of workshops and discussions around the UAL colleges – for more info about the meetings see this link. We had a full team turnout including Chris from the UAL DIAL project funded by JISC to improve digital literacies. Fascinating set of discussions about art education and education in general and what we can share and the implication for the future. As usual we got into some deep philosophical discussions – and all the better for it! We had an important discussion about skills needed to participate in OER sharing and the confidence that needs to be gained by people to put their stuff ‘out there’. The idea of ‘OER buddies’ who share the load and support each other was very well received as well and we shall be following that up and aim to increase the amount of on-site workshops.

Outcomes:
3 or 4 pledges to release content into the ALTO system at the UAL. A suggestion to pursue joint collaborative course development between different colleges at the UAL for an intro to drawing course (quite radical proposition that – especially for a collegiate outfit like the UAL!). 2 requests to talk to course teams about sharing and openess.

The drop-in workshop discussion approach seems to work and we will develop it further – fits well with our ‘fieldworker’ philosophy as well.

Posted in Dissemination, Meeting notes, Open education (group) | Tagged , | Leave a comment

JISC Developing Digital Literacies – Evaluation REALITY-CHECK Task

The questions below are intended as a reality-check exercise, for us to use as a project team in clarifying and ratifying our evaluation design, and for us to review so we can provide effective support and valuable sets of evidence across the programme. Reflection on where we’re at with evaluation should also help us all prepare for a productive webinar on Friday 13th April and your responses can be updated and used in your interim report.

Q1. Briefly describe your approach to evaluating your DL project. * What’s needed here is not a lot of detail or tables, just an outline of your overall methdology/design and/or the stage you feel you are at?

The early aims of the DIAL project was to run small and defined mini projects within a wider DIAL project/programme.  Therefore our approach was to evaluate each pilot project group individually at the beginning of their projects. This early localised evaluation helped to define the mini projects aims and objectives and improve the overall focus of the DIAL project.  Five pilot DIAL projects were identified at the beginning of the project. Follow up evaluation meetings are planned for all the mini projects in May/June 2012.

Q2. In what ways have you used the DL synthesis framework or evaluation templates offered by the programme, and/or created your own tools/approaches? * For example, you may have developed your evaluation design or plan in each of the six focus areas (strategy/policy, infrastructure, support, practice, expertise, stakeholders), some areas may be more relevant to your project and its evaluation, or you may have extended or adapted these tools or those from other programmes, institutional audits, skills/competence/graduate frameworks, etc..

The DIAL project employed Duna Sabri a freelance evaluator who consulted with project members to develop a framework of questions in order to structure the evaluation process. The following factors were taken in consideration:

1. Each of the community contacts is likely to be doing their own ongoing formative evaluation, drawing on JISC instruments, doing both systematic data collection and picking up evaluative comments informally.

2. Duna compiled an overview of data: First by setting up meetings with the 5 project group leaders and second by drawing together the data they collected sometime in June or July for formative purposes.  The purpose of this overview will be to see the differences as well as consistencies between the different projects.  They will be evaluated according to their own aims.  Among the questions Duna asked were:

– what are you hoping to achieve through participation in DIAL?
– how did you come to decide to take part?
– what approach are you planning to take in evaluating how your project goes?
– have you seen the JISC tools?  If so, how useful/appropriate were they?  Do you need help adapting them?
– what sort of evaluation data would you like to have by the end of the year?

Q3. What are your ‘big picture’ questions in relation to your intended changes/enhancements? * You should refer to your project aims, objectives & impact descriptions in your most recent project plan. Clarify what and who are you aiming to change or enhance? You may need to distinguish questions for your different stakeholders (who is most interested/concerned about these areas?).

  • How is the project engaging with students?
  • How is the project engaging with industry?
  • How to evaluate impact on staff development?
  • How do we measure/evaluate big picture institutional and cultural change?

Q4. How far along are you in identifying what ‘success’ looks like in relation to those intended outcomes? * Please say where you are with creating/sharing a clear set of key indicators and impact measures at interim and final stages. For instance, what kinds of early evidence of progress towards outcomes do you expect and have plans to gather; what processes do you have in place to capture anecdotal/unintended outcomes (blogs, user diaries, observation, focus groups, note taking at stakeholder events), and how are you engaging with stakeholders to review & respond and come to conclusions about emerging findings, benefits and impact measures that are interesting and convincing to them?

Institutional baseline

Following the JISC baseline, the DIAL project board has agreed to support the development of an official institutional baseline report for its digital provision across all colleges and departments.

Surveys and focus groups

We’re currently running an online DIAL survey. The survey was circulated after the JISC baseline submission given our late project start. The survey was promoted to staff only and has received over 120 responses. The responses are very detailed and have produced valuable date – http://tinyurl.com/dial-survey

Six students in Six colleges. The DIAL project is piloting different feedback methods:

Student field worker pilot: We’ve used this method to gain ‘sound bite’ feedback from interviews with UAL staff and student in all six colleges.

Six Students were employed one from each college, we used our in-house employment agency artstemps. Each student was asked to spend at least 4 hours interviewing at least 6 individuals’ staff or students in their college.

They were asked to note what time and place you carried out the interview (café, canteen, studio, media suite, social spaces) The students were each given the following questions below as guidance, they were not required to use or to ask all the questions, the interviewee could choose the question/s they would like to answer, students could create new question specific to your college if necessary.

  • Where and how do students/staff want to access information?
  • What equipment and skills do staff/students need to deliver the blended, social and mobile learning?
  • What online digital resources would you like to use?
  • Would you like to engage with tutors online and see online resources?
  • Could students create online learning resources, if so how?
  • What support do students and staff need to help create resources?
  • Should UAL evaluate digital skill levels of staff and students?
  • Which digital skill sets are important to you?
  • Do you feel connected: to other UAL colleges and individuals?
  • Do you feel connected: to industry and professionals in your specialism?
  • How can UAL improve online participation and networks?

Focus Groups & workshops

http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/01/20/meeting-notes-open-education-at-the-ual/

http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/03/20/what-is-lcf-ology/

http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2011/11/17/learning-studio-alto-dial/

http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2011/11/18/feedback-notes-from-enterprise-week-session-%E2%80%98sharing-knowledge-improve-and-develop-professional-identities%E2%80%99/

Q5. How well do you feel your evaluation activities integrate with other project activities and gather data about uptake and engagement levels? * E.g. Do you have workpackage tasks that detail specific evaluation activities, including the above as well as other impact measures such as usage/participation/satisfaction data. Does your timeline show clearly the linkages/opportunities to integrate evaluation with baselining, development work, implementation/pilots, stakeholder consultation/dissemination etc. ?  

DIAL project or programme?

The DIAL project was always going to be bigger than a project and by acknowledging this and looking at DIAL as a potential UAL programme we can better build a case for developing a UAL wide digital strategy and sustainability plans to develop and maintain progressive digital practice at UAL. So DIAL will run as a programme and do its best to acknowledge as wide a spectrum of issues as possible although it cannot address everything. The DIAL project groups are trialing different methods of developing and documenting their projects. We are developing a ‘Work package brief’ template with some of the pilot project groups in order to improve communication and alignment with the wider programme aims and objectives.

Summary of DIAL group projects activities to date:

  1. Open education at UAL (have three more discussion groups to come at WCA, CCA, and LCC, the overall aim to is to produce a handbook (need identified by the stakeholders)– ‘Getting started/how to do Open Education at UAL’ including: Teaching resources, Individual and institutional recommendations for the future and a open education sustainability plan for UAL.  ) All up-to-date info is here – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/category/open-education/ We have set up a content/resource cluster group: http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/open-and-flexible-learning
  2. The Presentation skills group All up-to-date info is here – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1qVtyAbhABw2b2QoP7eDutiqOEoI0hcBCBpJo097IWjw/edit
    We have set up a content/resource cluster group (Laura will be posting soon) – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/presentation-skills
  3. The Information literacies group – just starting their workshops with staff, students are supporting staff in the project development (they will be setting up a blog for their resources soon). All up-to-date info is here – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1rtSSx2o4CUkIxdNkWxdMTn9j5QDK8cx058sGqlmzUgE/edit
  4. The Online Reflective Practice groupis beginning to take shape and Lindsay is due to post some updates before the end of the month.We have set up a content/resource cluster group – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/cltad-teaching-development-projects
  5. We also have some new groups forming:
    Developing your online professional identities  – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1SbfigfrUYanJjEyZ8_zCpggW3w56ba3wu-XkAaV7wW0/edit  – We have set up a content/resource cluster group – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/enterprise-and-employability-curriculumTwo successful 2012 Teaching & Professional Fellowship Awards, both projects are aligned closely with DIAL’s objectives and we look forward to working together – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/04/12/teaching-professional-fellowship-awards-2012/UAL Community of Practice (CoP) awards – The Learning Studio – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/learning-studio and Drupal UAL – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/drupal-ual

Some initial (very rough) ideas on the common features Duna our project evaluator has observed in the five pilot projects.

1. The aspirations for each the projects have their roots in group leaders’ reflections on their own roles and emerge from long-standing challenges that they want to tackle, and perhaps up to now have not had the time or resources to attend to them.  They are issues that can’t be dealt with in a piece-meal day-to-day way but benefit from an injection of attention and resource that DIAL brings.

2. There’s a substantial affective dimension to almost all the projects that is related to the particular kind of digital literacy that they seek to develop.  The relationship between the affective and the technological varies from project to project.  For example, Lindsay’s online reflective practice project is dealing with teachers’ fear of learning in public, the open and flexible education project is dealing with the discomfort of making curricular resources public, and Laura’s digital presentation skills project is dealing with anxieties relating to presenting oneself.

3. All of the projects are aiming to make some use of the relationships between different members of their target communities.  Some plan to get more literate/confident members to work with less literate/confident members, others aim to bring together opposing views, staff working on similar courses from different colleges, or students from different cohorts.  The configurations vary depending on how the projects define their particular hurdles.

Q6. What further support do you feel you need or would benefit from in relation to designing, planning out or undertaking your project’s evaluation? * For instance, preference for wiki resources/toolkit, webinars, cluster sessions, individual skype conferences, identifying external evaluators.

More group debates and workshops – nicely presented easy viewing case studies would be good, videos.

Q7. Are there any other points you’d like to raise about evaluating your project? Anything that hasn’t come up in these questions.

No

Q8. Finally, reading through your answers above, what are the critical elements you feel you may need to pay closer attention to? (I suggest you put some ideas down now, and revisit this as an action point after the webinar.) * For instance, you might wish to adjust the scope or focus/priorities of your evaluation questions, review evaluation milestones or timeframes for identifying/gathering different kinds of quantitative and qualitative evidence, consider alternative methodologies & data gathering or analysis needs, align evaluation with other stakeholder engagement activities as opportunities to ask about types of evidence that would be relevant and convincing to them, discuss early findings, review project effectiveness & communication, consult on emerging outcomes and final impact measures).

I would like to find out/get feedback/plan for the additional big picture overall project/programme evaluation. E.g. are we doing enough and how best to prepare for the next phase of the project and prepare an adapted evaluation plan in advance.

 

 

Posted in Evaluation | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Teaching & Professional Fellowship Awards 2012

Many congratulations to the two successful 2012 Teaching & Professional Fellowship Awards, both projects are aligned closely with DIAL’s objectives and we look forward to working together :

Gabriela Daniels & Oliver Furlong: Learning videos – making them work for you

‘The project will explore the value and the degree of integration of on-line instruction videos in practice based learning and teaching.  We will gather information of how existing videos are integrated in the learning and teaching practices of a group of academic and technical staff, and used independently by the learners.  The project findings will lead to the proposal of guidelines for future resource creation and integration. The project will draw on the support and expertise of existing UAL’s projects such as ALTO and DIAL’.

Darren Raven & Lesley Raven: Improving Employability for Widening Participation Students: a cross-college and cross-discipline initiative

‘This project aims to investigate student work-based learning experiences with LCC and LCF industry partners to identify models of best practice, develop equitable industry experiences and subsequently increase applications by and employment opportunities for Widening Participation students’.

Full details of how these projects have progressed will be available on the Human Resources website in autumn 2012

Posted in #UALbestpractice, DIAL updates | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Open Education at the UAL – Focus and discussion group meetings

Open Education at the UAL  Focus and discussion group meetings – All Welcome

What: Open Education at the UAL

Where: Wimbledon College, 1st floor meeting room

When: 25th April 12:30 – 14:30

Dear Colleagues,  You are warmly invited to a series of focus and discussion group meetings around the theme of encouraging and supporting UAL staff and students to participate in the growing worldwide open education movement.  These meetings will examine what is involved in sharing some of our learning resources openly on the web for others to use and how this may benefit staff, the UAL and students.

If this is new to you, here is a link to a list of reasons to ‘Go Open’ – what do you think? http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/inside-out-benefits-sharing-our-learning-resources.   The meetings are part of the work of two UAL projects that are tasked with exploring and improving our ability to create and share open learning resources and to develop the skills and confidence in staff and students to work and collaborate in the digital world:

DIAL – Digital Integration into Arts Learning – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/about-dial

ALTO – Arts Learning and Teaching Online – http://blogs.arts.ac.uk/alto/about

If you have any questions about the meeting or indeed about developing open learning and digital literacy at the UAL please contact the DIAL project manager Chris Follows at c.follows@arts.ac.uk and John Casey ALTO Project Manager Cltad  University of the Arts London

Posted in Activity & progress, Communities of Practice, Dissemination, Open education (group) | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Technology in HE teaching: blended learning and beyond

Article from the Guardian – http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/blog/2012/feb/06/blended-learning-in-higher-education?CMP=twt_gu

Blended learning, where online learning opportunities are offered along side traditional face-to-face sessions, is growing in popularity in HE. In an interview on the Guardian Higher Education Network, David Ward, acting VC of University of Wisconsin, Madison, said that his greatest challenge today is to “figure out blended instruction.”

But despite the growing uptake of blended learning across educational institutions – particularly in the US – there is still some misunderstanding about what blended learning is and the ways in which it can enrich teaching and learning. A common misconception is that blended learning is the same as distance learning and some worry is that it loses the emotional connection between teacher and student. Read more …http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/blog/2012/feb/06/blended-learning-in-higher-education?CMP=twt_gu

Posted in National debate | Leave a comment

Introduction project management, DIAL & open education at UAL a case study

I recently attended a very productive 2 day introduction to project management course at UAL by Emma Altman, was very timely for me given DIAL is my first officially managed project. It was a great opportunity to road test the DIAL project plan and discuss projects with a focused group of like minded individuals. There were two significant outcomes I’d taken from these two days:

1) DIAL project or programme? (The DIAL project was always going to be bigger than a project and by acknowledging this and looking at DIAL as a potential UAL programme we can better build a case for developing a UAL wide digital strategy and sustainability plans to develop and maintain progressive digital practice at UAL. So DIAL will run as a programme and do its best to acknowledge as wide a spectrum of issues as possible although it can not address everything. DIAL will concentrate on supporting a small number of DIAL project groups, these focused mostly ‘grassroots’ projects  will address issues identified in the DIAL project plan, ‘Open education at UAL’ is one of DIAL’s first pilot groups)

2) Using the DIAL project ‘open education at UAL’ as a group case study example.

On day 2 we were asked if we’d like to work on some generic case studies or if we had any in-house examples, I suggested we use the DIAL/ALTO ‘open education at UAL’ project as case study examples, the group responded well to this challenge and got to work. As a starting point the groups looked at the existing notes and evaluation summary we had prepared previously (see here).

After much debate the two groups concluded:

Aims:

  • Let people know what to do and how to do OER at UAL
  • Open at UAL baseline – what is it like now. unconnected, no overall strategy, variable resources and responsibilities, specialist.
  • What it will be like, strategy and sustainable model, clear direction for UAL , Institutional shift ‘cultural change’

Outputs:

  • Produce a handbook – ‘Getting started/how to do Open Education at UAL’ including: Teaching resources, Individual and institutional recommendations for the future and a open education sustainability plan for UAL.

Objectives: Specific

  • Debate: Issues, reservations & potentials
  • Investigate: Expertise, delivery, are of focus, (ie digital non digital)

Objectives: Measurable

  • Contribution of people – who? & Why?
  • Student perception and the balance of self directed learning verses ‘taught’ (Technology in HE teaching: blended learning and beyond)

Approach

  •  Data analysis – small drop-ins, debates and focus groups across all colleges
  • Include/encourage those non-self selecting open enthusiasts
  • Record debate outcomes – blog posts and compare – participants to contribute
  • Time spent on this should be quick, project should be a scoping exercise
  • Investigation into open educational resources – looking into who would be the contributors and who would be the users (be good to see how people see themselves in this space)

Quality assurance

  • Understanding restrictions balance with UALs academic standards and assessment criteria

And the end of the session Emma released some OER of her own:

Change Notice template d0.1

DISC quick guide

Work Package Brief template d0.1

 

Posted in Dissemination, Evaluation, Open education (group) | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Updated notes Open Educational project

Here’s a quick update on the Open Education at UAL project we are running as part of DIAL/ALTO . Team ALTO/DIAL have been out in the field meeting with UAL staff at various sites across UAL – we have completed sessions at CSM, LCF and at CCAD and had various other feedback/discussions which has informed the project to date: http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/tag/open-education-debate/

Our key aims are to engage with people who are interested in producing OER, a self-selected group. Our aim is to expand the boundaries of that community by:

  1. Generating debate about the OER that addresses peoples’ fears, (mis)conceptions, and aspirations for what it might achieve
  2. Reviewing the factors that have underpinned achievements in ALTO/process.arts and formulating some strategies accordingly.

Our original Approach was:

Part 1 of the plan is to set up a live debate, preceded by an online debate on OER.  Two prominent speakers will be invited.  The first debate will focus on OER in Fine Art.

Part 2 is to start reviewing ALTO/process.arts, we will work compile demographic information about the authors who have contributed thus far.  E.g. which colleges they come from, the number of items contributed, discipline areas, staff group, types of resource.

How might we evaluate this?

Part 1 – reflective interviews with debate participants

Part 2 – The data itself is evaluative.  We might also ask – to what extent is the information collected sufficient to tell us something about who is interested in engaging with OED.  Do we also need to do some interviews with a sample of contributors?

What’s changed ?

We had planned to hold a big ‘Open Education at UAL’ event at UAL during global education week but felt this was too much too soon and should go back to basics and instead carry out small ‘on the ground’ focus groups, disscusions and debates.

Given the postponement of the big debate and that we set up more local focus groups our project evaluator Duna advised us (28 February 2012) to re-think our approach to the project evaluation.  What data do we want to collect and pass on to Duna to evaluate?

Here are some options:

1. Pick 3 people from each meeting who you think represent different constituencies (more engaged/not engaged or have different roles managing/tutoring) and ask them to respond to a couple of questions by email.  The questions could include: Before coming what did you think was the purpose of the meeting for you? In what ways, if any, did it fulfil that purpose?  What insights did you gain from coming?

2. Record how many people come, their jobs, their disciplines.  Consider to what extent this profile is representative of the college as a whole.  Who is missing?  Identify people who represent those groups and ask them whether they heard about the meeting, and what prevented them from coming.  (This needs to be done carefully – without coming across as blaming staff for not coming.  So emphasise it’s about evaluating your approach and its relevance to all staff.)

3. Write up your own reflections on the focus groups independently, compare them with each other, not deleting any differences.  Produce a version that is joint but that might contain some question where you disagree.  Then send this version to one or two participants in the focus groups and ask them to comment.

4. Get all participants to write one sentence about OE at their college the start of the focus groups and keep it to themselves.  Ask them to comment on that sentence, in writing at the end.  They then take that piece of paper away with them and send you their comments after a period of reflection.  You could engage in this process yourselves as well – checking your assumptions about each of the colleges.

With this in mind and the feedback we’ve had to date we have revised  our evaluation plan: See revised  our evaluation plan (comming soon)

 


Posted in Dissemination, Evaluation, Open education (group) | Tagged | 1 Comment

Notes from meeting on DIAL Open Educational at UAL project

Chris follows and John Casey (project lead)

Duna Sabri (evaluator)

Date of meeting: 24th January

What is the context for this project?

ALTO (Arts Learning and Teaching Online) just launched last week.  Its purpose is to provide a space and a means for people who teach to store and share resources.  ALTO 1 was specific to UAL ALTO 2 is UK-wide, though both are outwards facing.  This project is very much a follow-on that focuses on the community and social dimensions of what it means to store and share resources.

One of the barriers is that people think they have to have a polished presentational quality to their resources – this isn’t the case.  MIT is a good example of good quality content that pays little attention to presentation.  It’s important that those thinking about generating OER see it as a sustainable activity that doesn’t require unattainable skills or resources.

Who is your community? And what are you aiming to do?

People who are interested in producing OER, a self-selected group. Our aim is to expand the boundaries of that community by:

  1. Generating debate about the OER that addresses peoples’ fears, (mis)conceptions, and aspirations for what it might achieve
  2. Reviewing the factors that have underpinned achievements in ALTO and process.arts and formulating some strategies accordingly.

Approach

Part 1 of the plan is to set up a live debate, preceded by an online debate on OER.  Two prominent speakers will be invited.  The first debate will focus on OER in Fine Art.

Part 2 is to start reviewing ALTO, we will work compile demographic information about the authors who have contributed thus far.  E.g. which colleges they come from, the number of items contributed, discipline areas, staff group, types of resource.

How might we evaluate this?

Part 1 – reflective interviews with debate participants

Part 2 – The data itself is evaluative.  We might also ask – to what extent is the information collected sufficient to tell us something about who is interested in engaging with OED.  Do we also need to do some interviews with a sample of contributors?

Notes compiled by Duna Sabri 1st February 2012

Notes mtg 1 open learning resources-3

 

 

Posted in Dissemination, Evaluation, Open education (group) | Tagged | 2 Comments

DIAL project board meeting agenda 12/03/12

DIAL project board meeting – DIAL Advisory Board 12-03-12

12 March 2012, 12:00 – 14:00

9th Floor Boardroom, High Holborn

 

AGENDA

 Attending: Shân Wareing, Chris Follows Katie Christie, Pat Christie, Mark Constable, Jason Copley, Amanda Bright, Philip Gourlay and Nancy Turner

 Apologies: Stephen Beddoe, Alexandra Lumley, Simon Betts. Alison James,
Sarah Rowles

12:00 Welcome

 

  1. 1.    Chris Follows DIAL project set up, update and overview.

1.1. DIAL blog http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/

1.2. Baseline report

1.3. Project plan outline http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/project-plan/

1.4. Workpackages and budget

1.5. Surveys http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/category/survey/

1.6. DIAL Objectives http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/02/10/objectives/

1.7. Discussion & feedback
12:30 Objectives 1

 

  1. 2.    Institutional:(progress and examples)

2.1. Support the implementation of digitally enhanced learning and digital support networks

2.2. Discussion & feedback

 

13:00 Objectives 2

 

  1. Staff: (progress and examples)

3.1. A) Improved flexible approaches to CPD & PPD staff development

3.2. B) Support the implementation of digitally enhanced learning into practice

3.3. Discussion & feedback

 13:30 Objectives 3

 

  1. Students: (progress and examples)

4.1. Improved graduate employability by enhancing presentation skills and professional online identities. 

4.2. Discussion & feedback

Finish by 14:00: A summary report will be produced for the team following the meeting.

 

 

Posted in Dissemination, Project board, Senior Management and Strategy | Tagged , | Leave a comment

What is LCF-Ology?

It’s a new approach to staff development that provides a mix of informal and formal learning opportunities, with an opportunity to eat good food and network.

It provides a safe space away from the demands of work, a space to learn about some of the digital and technical possibilities at LCF, a space to ask the questions that you sometimes don’t get the opportunity to ask. It also provides the chance to provide feedback – and hopefully put aside the ‘infrastructure issues’ (for a moment) and focus on practice and possibilities.

Dial at the LCF-Ology – get involved!

Room 418a – Chris Follows – 11:00 – 15:00

The DIAL project (Digital Integration into Arts Learning) is a two year JISC funded digital literacies (DL) project at UAL. The DIAL project aims to improve graduate employability and bring about cultural change by developing confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students.

DIAL will encourage, support and collaborate with ‘staff led’ fellowships, secondments and projects’ to mutual benefit of the staff involved and the common good.

Drop in and have an informal chat with our specialist

Come and get more information, give your views or find out how to get involved.

When is it?

Wednesday 21 March, 10:00 – 16:30

That’s too short notice, I’m busy!

Yes, it may seem like short notice but sometimes that just cannot be avoided. You do not have to come to the whole day, if you have other commitments, just drop in when you can.

Who is it targeted at?

Everyone – all LCF Staff are invited. There are particular sessions that will be of more interest to particular staff roles, however, we hope you find something that interests you – even if it is just the extra special all day buffet and free mystery prizes.

How do I sign up?

Have a look at the attached programme, decide on what you want to attend, and just drop me an email to let me know what you are interested in. The programme also contains information on what sessions need booking and where you can just drop in.

Why should I attend?

Because the day has been created especially for you – and we need your input, your presence, your time.

Do ALs and VPs get paid to attend?

There will be a flat rate of two hours paid to all ALs and VPs who attend.

Wednesday 21 March 10:00 – 16:30 John Prince’s Street, Various Rooms

Workshops require booking and have limited spaces.

Open Access involves individual or group slots that are booked directly with the Specialist on the day. The Open Access session will only run for 1.5 hours, which may mean 15/20 minutes for each individual slot depending on the demand.

Drop-In Studio does not required booking, you can pop in and see any of our Drop-in Specialists, find out more about their subjects/areas of expertise, tailor the discussion to your individual needs – while you have something to eat and drink.


The LCF ALL Day Buffet is only available to staff who have booked a place/expressed an interest in attending….

Breakfast Buffet available from 10:30 – 12:00

 Lunch Buffet available from 12:00 – 14:00

 Tea Buffet available from 14:00 – 16:00

Posted in #UALbestpractice, Dissemination, Learning Studio, UAL Training | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Learning Studio Workshop on Digital and Social Media for Teaching and Learning

Where: Staff Club, CSM, Kings Cross When:  15:30 – 18:00 on Monday 19th March

  • Sian Evans:  Facebook to support communication, BA Jewellery Design
  • Cath Caldwell: Using Workflow in BA Graphic Design
  • John Jackson: How to set-up Workflow.
  • Hywel Davies: Cross-institutional collaboration on the ALTO project, BA Fashion Communication and Promotion
  • Jo Morrison: MyArts Blog and Skype to support student collaboration with MIT
  • Chris Follows: DIAL – The DIAL project aims to address improved graduate employability and cultural change by developing confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students.
  • Karen Fletcher and Nick Lloyd: An introduction to Lynda.com
  • Colin Buttimer: How new course pages integrate with existing digital communications, and online forms for interim customer relationship management.

 

 

Posted in Communities of Practice, Development and Learning training, Learning Studio | Tagged | Leave a comment

Open Education at the UAL discussion group meetings

As part of the work of two UAL CLTAD projects (DIAL and ALTO) we are holding a series of consultation meetings at Central St. Martins, Chelsea and Wimbledon around the themes of open education and digitally enhanced learning.

Focus and discussion group meetings – All Welcome
Meeting 1
Where: Central St. Martins, Kings Cross, A002 (reception meeting room)
Meeting 2
Where: Chelsea College, Room A208
Meeting 3
Where: Wimbledon College, 1st floor meetings room
When: 25th April 12:30 – 14:30
Dear Colleagues, You are warmly invited to a series of focus and discussion group meetings around the theme of encouraging and supporting UAL staff and students to participate in the growing worldwide open education movement.
These meetings will examine what is involved in sharing some of our learning resources openly on the web for others to use and how this may benefit staff, the UAL and students. If this is new to you, here is a link to a list of reasons to ‘Go Open’ – what do you think? http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/inside-out-benefits-sharing-our-learning-resources.
The meetings are part of the work of two UAL projects that are tasked with exploring and improving our ability to create and share open learning resources and to develop the skills and confidence in staff and students to work and collaborate in the digital world:
DIAL – Digital Integration into Arts Learning – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/about-dial
ALTO – Arts Learning and Teaching Online – http://blogs.arts.ac.uk/alto/about
If you have any questions about the meeting or indeed about developing confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students at the UAL please contact the DIAL project manager
Chris Follows at c.follows@arts.ac.uk.
John Casey ALTO Project Manager
Cltad
University of the Arts London

 

Posted in Open education (group), Open source | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Demystify courses, make teaching more explicit

What does the University of the Arts London need to do to improve further?

Some of my notes following the recent FE provision OFSTED report recommendations, the below are choice sections that support DIAL’s ongoing baseline full report can be viewed here – http://newsevents.arts.ac.uk/files/2012/03/OFSTEDreport2012.pdf

On a few courses, students commented that the poor attendance of some students had a detrimental impact on the progress of the whole group. (Could more flexible and open participation through improved digitally enhanced learning support this?) e.g. Make courses more explicit through use of digital, documentation and communication.

In less than good sessions tutors do not always plan learning explicitly or check that all students are involved and are making good progress. Tutors’ written feedback following assessment does not always provide sufficiently clear and specific detail for students to reflect on after their assessment tutorial. (Could more flexible and open participation through improved digitally enhanced learning support this?) e.g. Make courses more explicit through use of digital, documentation and communication.

Demystify courses, how do we make teaching more explicit.

The teaching as mystery metaphor as Brookfield, S. (1995) suggests: “If good or bad teaching are all a matter of chance then there is no point trying to do better. The teaching as mystery metaphor also closes down the possibility of teachers sharing knowledge, insights, and informal theories of practice since mystery is, by definition, incommunicable.”  Brookfield, S. 1995. The Getting of Wisdom: What Critically Reflective Teaching is and Why It’s Important. [online] (Last modified on: 2005-05-01 12) http://nlu.nl.edu/academics/cas/ace/facultypapers/StephenBrookfield_Wisdom.cfm [Accessed 12 February 2012].

Increase the proportion of outstanding teaching by routinely and regularly monitoring teaching and learning, ensuring that observation records are more evaluative and that feedback to individuals clearly identifies strengths and areas for improvement. Share existing good practice in teaching and learning more widely.

Continue to improve the quality of provision by ensuring that self-assessment and action planning for improvement are consistently thorough and rigorous across all the colleges.

What students would like to see improved:

  • the booking system for technical workshops to alleviate the delay caused by high demand for some specialist workshop equipment in 3D, printmaking and textiles
  • the consistent application of attendance expectations and policy to minimise the adverse effect on group dynamics of poor attendance by some students
  • more workshops at Central Saint Martins
  • better communications about what and where guest speakers are available.

Key findings

CSM key finding highlights best practice
Studios and display spaces are well appointed. Print, 3D and digital workshops, as well as some specialist textile facilities, are well managed and heavily used. At times of high demand, access to some of these is sometimes restricted. Regular displays of recent work by students in communal spaces enable students to share ideas and provide insight into the work of other specialist practice. Foundation students have access to the exceptional library and collections housed in the college’s striking new building at nearby King’s Cross.

Emphasis on evaluating and communicating ideas often leads to innovative solutions and confident command of the creative process. Students’ excellent reflective journals clearly demonstrate how their work and thinking develops over time.

CCW  key finding highlights best practice
Resources and specialist facilities are very good. Students benefit from additional lectures and activities beyond their usual timetabled sessions. Students make good use of high-quality resources and materials on the virtual learning environment to support work in progress, or if they miss lectures or activities. Students benefit from excellent technical and workshop support available to them during, and beyond, timetabled sessions. Tutors and technical support staff are very well qualified.

The university has managed the restructuring of the foundation course skilfully and tutors value the open and supportive approach to change. Tutors have benefited from new opportunities to work in more diverse teams and share best practice. Students have benefited from the richer learning environment, increased contact with specialist staff and from greater access to resources.

Resources and specialist facilities are very good. Students benefit from additional lectures and activities beyond their usual timetabled sessions. Students make good use of high-quality resources and materials on the virtual learning environment to support work in progress, or if they miss lectures or activities. Students benefit from excellent technical and workshop support available to them during, and beyond, timetabled sessions. Tutors and technical support staff are very well qualified.

 

Posted in Baselining | Leave a comment

Cap and gown learning on a shoestring budget

With novel credentials being developed and employers seeing the value of low-cost study based on open courseware, Jon Marcus asks if the bricks-and-mortar elite will end up on the wrong side of history –

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&storycode=419088&c=2

Posted in National debate, Practice based accreditation tool, Technology trends | Tagged | Leave a comment

Policy and strategy

DIAL: Digital integration into arts learning Baseline Report (ongoing) 

1.   Policy and strategy

What institutional policies and strategic/vision statements have a bearing on digital literacy, digital competence, ‘C21st graduate attributes’ etc. e.g. learning and teaching strategy?

UAL Statistics and strategies: Aligning and embedding DIAL project to UAL strategies. What are UALs past, present and future strategies (specifically in relation to technological and digital strategies) in response to the aims and objectives of key UAL strategies. http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/01/23/university-strategy/
  Six distinctive and distinguished Colleges make up University of the Arts London:Camberwell College of Arts

Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design

Chelsea College of Art and Design

London College of Communication

London College of Fashion

Wimbledon College of Art

Located within London, the Colleges are at the heart of their respective communities. Drawing on and contributing to the local culture, they foster closely-knit and welcoming environments in which to study, supported by all the resources of the larger University and the wider arts community.

 

Posted in Baseline report | Tagged , | Leave a comment

DIAL survey (short)

Please take a little time (less than 5 minutes) to tell us a little bit about how you use digital technology – and what you think about what you use. http://tinyurl.com/dial-survey

Posted in Survey | 2 Comments

Cloud and Crowd: Towards a collaborative future

Designs on E-Learning International Conference: 5th, 6th and 7th September 2012 University of the Arts, London

Cloud and Crowd: Towards a collaborative future

The eighth Designs on E-Learning international conference in the use of technology for teaching and learning in art, design and communication will be hosted by the Centre for Learning and Teaching (cltad) at University of the Arts, London on the 5th, 6th and 7th September 2012.

Following conferences hosted by Penn State University and then SCAD in Savannah, Georgia in the U.S, in 2011 the venue was Aalto University in Helsinki, Finland. For 2012 the conference is returning to London where the first was held in 2005. Attendees have been truly international, coming from the northernmost reaches of Scandinavia, to China, Korea, New Zealand and Australia, from the UK, several countries of Europe, and from North and South America.

As technologies continue to evolve, allowing students and lecturers greater flexibility, greater ease of use and unique possibilities for inclusion in the arts and design studio, the unique conference which is Designs on eLearning is an invaluable source of new and tested ideas and a forum for collaboration.

The format of the conference will be innovative, with barcamps, streamed sessions, discussions, performances and creative work. We are particularly interested in submissions by artists, museums and galleries and those involved in Art and Design practice in education. Joint lecturer/student submissions are also welcome.

Conference Themes for 2012:

  • Social Media
  • The Studio and Technology
  • Digital Literacy
  • User Generated Content
  • Collaboration and Community Building
  • Sustainability

Call for Papers

We are currently inviting the submission of abstracts for consideration by 20th April 2012.

Register your interest

To register your interest in the 2012 conference, please add your details to the Conference Mailing List.

If you wish any further information please get in touch with:

Robin Shaw
Conference Organiser
r.shaw@arts.ac.uk

or

Charlotte Webb
Administrator
c.webb@arts.ac.uk

Posted in Funding | Tagged | Leave a comment

Sustainability Plans

Project Outputs

Why Sustainable

Scenarios for Taking Forward

Issues to Address

Communities of practice New ways of UAL communication and resource development Embed into future policy and UAL web environments UAL use of Web 2:0 technology
Defined new institutional terms, definitions and policies including: flexible learning, digital citizenship and open education. Support future curriculum development Embed into future policy How have these terms and concepts been embedded?
Curriculum change and new flexible for CPD and PPD learning opportunities Examples for UAL to use in implementing change at course level New policy and strategies flexible learning at UAL opportunities Being open and curriculum integration and embeding
Improved student confidence and UAL support of student online professional practice UAL tools, resources and Cops to help support ongoing development Student enterprise Resource development and course integration and adoption of these issues

Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | Leave a comment

Evaluation Plan

Timing Factor to Evaluate Questions to

Address

Method(s) Measure of Success
Throughout (formative) Final 3 months (summative) Approach taken Successes and

limitations, lessons

learned

Iterative reflection in

project reports and on blog Critical friend feedback

Achievements against objectives
Early baselining stage (Jan 2012) WP1 Online communication, blog, social networking, all college presence, workshops, focus groups, events, analysis of existing research documents, open forums Has DIAL done its best to engage, encourage and support staff and students to self identify Quantitive & qualitive data. What data already exists, how is it being used & presented, what evidence do we have? What strategies are in place or being implemented to address how the digital is being used and integrated? New &/or recurring troublesome problems highlighted, best practices identified from across all colleges and departments
Baseline diagnostics

Provide some (editable) tools that team and community members can use – complementing whatever is on the JISC site (see resources below) In order to design DIAL-specific tools. Duna will conduct some interviews with team members and community members. 

Groups Pilot phases (Jan – June 2012) WP 3 Have students and staff self identified DIAL group projects, are they addressing a particular problem or issues specific to their specialism or areas. Has DIAL done its best to engage, encourage and support staff and students to self identify and establish DIAL group communities? Case studies

Learning

Journeys, basic resources, OER use, community/team involvement

Noticeable Impact on a particular practice, course or department. New cross course/college communication & connectivity examples
The DIAL groups are already beginning to form so at as earlier stage as possible the evaluation team will provide the pilot groups with a basic ’embed’ evaluation framework to apply to their community development plans. (Duna)

All will have documented a starting point and an initial benchmark (which may well be revised in the light of experience)

Engage with industry/sector partner, form group (Mar 12 – July 13) Are the DIAL project team engaging industry partners and the DIAL groups collaborating with the industry partners effectively and how? Impact Indicators – Institutional change, High level aims
Has project engaged with key college departments including web environment, HR and student enterprise teams? (Mar 12 – July 13) What are DIAL project embedding project aims into college systems and departments? Who has been contacted and involved to date
Group & communication development May 12 – July 13 – WP 8 Are students and staff working on self identified DIAL group projects groups continuing to develop, how are the groups addressing particular problems or issues specific to their specialism or areas.
Resource development Feb 12 – July 13 – WP 7 Are the DIAL groups producing suitable resources? Are these resources OER and being re-used? Are resources appropriate for use and meet project aims and objectives?
Sustainability – April 12 – July 2013 How is DIAL being integrated into the UAL framework, processes and policies? Impact Indicators Impact Indicators – Institutional change, High level aims

Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | Leave a comment

Project Management

The Project will be managed by a part-time Project Manager, Chris Follows, who will report to a Project Board, and be line-managed by Dr Shân Wareing Dean of Learning and Teaching Development, PM and PD to meet forthrightly for first six months of project and monthly there after.

DIAL will consist of a number of small project teams (DIAL groups) DIAL will support and guide these projects under its programme and DIAL aims and objectives. DIAL group members/leaders will receive ongoing support from the PM and project teams/community, project groups will independently develop and manage their specific mini projects and communicate and share development and progress openly via DIAL blog and website, email and telephone, PM will meet with mini project teams every monthly.

PM will meet with project ‘operations team’ every 3 months, PM and PD to meet with project board every six months

Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | Leave a comment

Standards

DIALwill us existing UAL support for publishing of OER resources and case studies using inhouse repositories and web site policies and procedures.

Name of standard or specification

Version

Notes

In house systems http://alto.arts.ac.uk/filestore/help.html – manuals
Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | Leave a comment

Technical Development

There is no technical development directly involved in this project although the project will make best use of existing in house Word Press blog or Drupal software and \or develop institutional development as small agile project pilots, aligning with existing UAL in-house web developments.

Project blog Word Press http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/links/
ALTO project repository http://alto.arts.ac.uk/filestore/
Resource development and communication – possible group development space http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/discipline/research-practice/dial
Drupal Open source small development of existing code
Twitter http://twitter.com/#!/dialproject
Scoop.it http://www.scoop.it/t/developing-digital-literacies
Facebook http://www.facebook.com/pages/Dial-Digital-Integration-into-Arts-Learning /140558392717560?sk=wall
Workflow http://workflow.arts.ac.uk/interaction/forum/view.php?id=65
MS Word For project documentation, some project outputs
MS Excel For managing survey and other data
Final Cut Pro Video editing
Adobe creative suite Resource development
GoogleDocs For project documentation
Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | Leave a comment

Risk Analysis

Risk Description

Probability (P)

1 – 5

(1 = low

5 = high)

Severity (S)

1 – 5

(1 = low

5 = high)

Risk Score

(PxS)

Detail of action to be taken

(mitigation / reduction / transfer / acceptance)

Lack of engagement at course level from course leaders 4 5 20 Treat – Face to face support and engagement, senior management support may prove critical
Lack of stakeholder participation 3 5 15 Treat – Addressed by specifying requirements and paying for time spent on project.
Staff resistance to change/digital literacy 4 5 20 Treat -The team will create an ethos of collaborative support rather than centralised enforcement; care in explaining purposes and expectations.
Students resistance to change/ engaging with digital literacy  3  4  12 Tolerate – The project will consult with students and ensure needs and expectations are addressed.
Online participation/ Blog use may decline. 3 5 15 Tolerate – Provide easy and dynamic alternatives and environments
Drop off of interest in year two 3 5 15 Transfer – Face to face support and engagement, senior management support may prove critical
Sector bodies may not engage fully. 4 4 16 Tolerate – Addressed by specifying requirements and paying for time spent on project.
Institution readiness for change may be sensitive or unresponsive. 3 5 15 Transfer – Senior management support may prove critical
Managing expectations project scope met 4 5 20 Treat – Define at early stage what is in and out of scope
Project aims and objectives not met  2  4  8 Strong project management and clear reporting of progress
Timing constraints due to the academic year  4  5  20 Treat – Serious attention given to this in all planning.
Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | 3 Comments

Assumptions

Project
  • Project management will 0:5 for first year to be reviewed second year
  • Project groups will be sustainable in the second year or without funded support
  • Colleges will supply the correct equipment to deliver support for use when needed
  • Key departments HR, web environment and student enterprise will adopt flexible learning approaches.
  • Courses will participate in the DIAL group small scale workshops and case studies
  • The university may not adopt and act on the findings of the DIAL project and make changes to DL culture and policies
  • Enough digital equipment and support to implement change and progression
  • Project will make up time lost at the beginning
  • That section 1.2 Objectives meet the needs of the stakeholders
  • The scope and parameters of the project are clear
  • No ‘global’ institutional change is expected to DL’s curriculum and policies across the whole institution, small change or impact are expected.
  • No full institutional cultural change but some small local change at course level impact is expected.
  • DIAL groups will be independent and attract cross college participation
  • The project will meet expectations
Stakeholders:
  • Interest will remain throughout the project
  • Participants will share and develop resources online
  • Stakeholders will engage and participate together online in groups
  • There are existing and willing core group of ‘champions ’ to lead and develop DIAL groups
  • Industry stakeholders will engage
  • Confidence and capability will improve and is measurable through case studies.
  • The project will find changing ‘habits, attitudes and beliefs’ difficult
Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | Leave a comment

Constraints

Constraints Action
Means to develop and produce an online DIAL network infrastructure Use existing OER content sharing platforms ALTO, myblog.arts and process.arts. Embed DIAl in UAL web environment development and Website Re-Development
Insufficient digital equipment Identify the problem to UAL and seek funding to support purchasing of digital equipment to support DIAL projects activities. Look at local equipment use.
Catch up time and progress lost at the beginning Intense start up period to meet all JISC project timescales, UAL extension of project end date beyond and following JISC final project report documentation.
Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | Leave a comment

Related Projects

Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | Leave a comment

Stakeholder Analysis

Stakeholder Interest / stake Importance (H/M/L)
Academic Staff Course case studies; flexible learning implementation and curriculum change Implement and explore new flexible learning approaches to staff development. Self identified group leaders or actively engaged group participants. Engaged and/or observe on the periphery H
Technical Staff Resource development Resource and course case studies Explore new flexible learning approaches to staff development. Self identified group leaders or actively engaged group participants. Engaged and/or observe on the periphery H
Non-student facing staff, HR, Development and Learning Resource development and integration Explore new flexible learning approaches to staff development new delivery. Self identified group leaders or actively engaged group participants. Engaged and/or observe on the periphery H
Library Services staff Module/s (Information literacies) Workshops & case studies Resource development and integration Explore new flexible learning approaches to staff development new delivery. Self identified group leaders or actively engaged group participants. Engaged and/or observe on the periphery H
Senior Management New flexible learning implementation and curriculum change. Support long term sustainability and integration Terminology clarification and policy implementation Implement and explore new flexible learning approaches to staff development. Self identified group leaders or actively engaged group participants. Engaged and/or observe on the periphery H
Web Environment team New flexible learning implementation and curriculum change Support long term sustainability and integration Infrastructure changes support collaboration and implement and explore new flexible learning approaches to staff development. Self identified group leaders or actively engaged group participants. Engaged and/or observe on the periphery H
Prospective Students Stakeholders may be engaged and/or observe on the periphery of wider DIAL communities and project throughout development. Potential pathways towards becoming actively engaged group participants. H
Current Students AlumniSUARTS (Students Union) Feedback through surveys Involvement in workshops and case studies Inform development of online web and identity support tutorials/modules. Self identified group leaders or actively engaged group participants. Stakeholders may also be engaged and/or observe on the periphery of wider DIAL communities and project throughout development. H
Institutional organisational groups: LCF: Key streams for Technology Board, Elearning Strategy Group, ISSG. Support new processes and initiatives Support self identified group leaders or actively engaged group participants. Stakeholders may also be engaged and/or observe on the periphery of wider DIAL communities and project throughout development. H
Institutional departments: Student Enterprise & Employability Service (SEE) CLTAD, Communications team, Web environment Team, Library learning services, Archives & collections, HR Industry contacts and support. Feedback through surveys Involvement in workshops and case studies Inform development of online web and identity support tutorials/modules. Resource development Resource and course case studies Explore new flexible learning approaches to staff development. Self identified group leaders or actively engaged group participants. Engaged and/or observe on the periphery H
Employers / Industry Inform development of online web and identity support tutorials/modules. Stakeholders may be engaged and/or observe on the periphery of wider DIAL communities and project throughout development. Potential pathways towards becoming actively engaged group participants. H
Existing projects, initiatives or partnerships, ELSG, ALTO, Artquest, ArtsTemps, UAL Platform, Jotta, Arts Showtime Inform development of online web and identity support tutorials/modules. Stakeholders may be engaged and/or observe on the periphery of wider DIAL communities and project throughout development. Potential pathways towards becoming actively engaged group participants. H
HE Sector Arts Sector JISC Stakeholders may be engaged and/or observe on the periphery of wider DIAL communities and project throughout development. Potential pathways towards becoming actively engaged group participants. M/L
Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | Leave a comment

Anticipated Impact

Impact Area

Anticipated Impact Description

Staff development HR/learn IT New blended approaches implemented
Flexible learning Support the integration of UAL flexible learning initiatives
Support institutional strategies DIAL aligned key project themes which support existing institutional strategies
Information Architecture/Content Review Project Synergies with DIAL project and long-term sustainability with the development of the UAL web environment.
Increased staff digital skills and confidence Web 2.0 tools and technologies in studios and workshops
Increased student digital skills and confidence Online presentation and presentation of professional online practice
DIAL online/offline communities of practice New web communities, social educational content sharing
Online confidence and student presentation skills Case studies and resources
Information literacies in Library Services Better staff more alignment with students
Open Education Support implementing and delivering support to UK OER projects at UAL ALTO and ALTO UK
Online Reflective Practice Digital Competence in Online Reflective Practice
UAL/LCF Fashion Colloquia project Institutional problems addressed to form in house national and international online collaboration

Impact Areas: maintain research excellence; maintain teaching & learning excellence; be more effective/save money; have a positive impact on wider society; be ready for technology needs in the future.

Posted in Project Plan | Tagged | Leave a comment