DIAL 2014

The Digital integration into Arts Learning (DIAL Project) a Community based approach to developing digital literacies and online practice.

DIAL develops and supports self-identifying and sustaining communities of practice in the creation of new resources, processes and learning networks. DIAL provides support, mentorship and incentives and supports partnerships and collaboration across projects.

DIAL 14  

Following the success of DIAL 2011-2013, UAL will continue to support the DIAL project for 2014.

Aim: Explore, research and pilot new approaches in supporting and enhancing learning & teaching through innovative use of online technologies.

Objective: Demonstrate the benefits and challenges of developing innovative and experimental approaches to online learning and practice, through the creation of collaborative workshops, case studies, resources and pilot prototypes.

DIAL 14 Project website under development (Link to follow)

DIAL 11/13

The DIAL project 2011 to 2013, was a partially funded by JISC Developing Digital Literacies Programme, the aims of the project were Cultural change and improved graduate employability. See DIAL 2011 – 2013 Executive summary

Download:

  • The DIAL (Institutional Story) Final report only .doc file
  • The DIAL (Institutional Story)  Final report and appendix 1 to 7 here as Zip file

Flyer-updated-3_proof

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Networked groups and cross college collaboration

DIAL successfully explored new ways of developing cross college collaborations, these new partnerships proved a valuable and sustainable method of the departmental embedding DLs long term.

Please see reflections on the DIAL collaboration from the Professional On-line Identities project (POI) collaborative work DIALSEEOwnIT and Learn IT: Continue reading

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Six UAL colleges and six differing approaches to digital literacies

In terms of DIAL college wide engagement CSM (POI project – BA Performance Design and Practice) and LCF (video presentation skills - MA Fashion Entrepreneurship) have had a majority of local engagement and these were through course engagement involving course staff as apposed to college engagement or support, DIAL did not have the capacity to address college or university wide engagement. Continue reading

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Defining Digital literacies focus group at LCF

The 3rd UAL Defining Digital literacies focus group took place at LCF on 5/6/13 DIAL were invited to deliver this as part of their Digital Champions Meeting. An open discussion took place and it was agreed that the group should openly exchange ideas by emailing them to Chris or posting them on the DIAL sites either the DIAL blog or clustering related content together on process.arts by tagging content related post with Digital literacies in the arts. A process.arts group could be created at any stage. Continue reading

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DIAL project update from DIALs SEE project partner Katie Mills

DIAL project update below from DIALs SEE project partner Katie Mills:

Having produced this summary and reading through the impact and value of the project it really comes to light just how valuable it has been, particularly in testing new models for internal collaboration and in relation to our own team and staff’s awareness to the importance and valuable of digital skills and professional identities within our area of work. I really hope you get further support and funding to take this work forward and we/SEE are eager to remain involved and build on the great work done so far. Continue reading

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Some perspectives on DIAL from Professor Shân Wareing

Please see some perspectives below from Professor Shân Wareing, Pro Vice Chancellor Learning and Teaching Buckinghamshire New University and formally DIAL project director and initiator of the DIAL project.

Shân Wareing who joined via Skype at Developing digital literacies programme meeting May 2013

What were the key drivers for undertaking the project? 

Institutionally, there was a sense that digital literacies were a fundamental requirement to progress institutional goals across multiple fields of activity: Heads of Service in HR, Library and IT, and Learning and Teaching, were all focussing on the digital literacies of staff and students as a potential barrier to the success of numerous areas of work.  However, there was a sense of frustration around how to take this area forwards.  The JISC call for projects seemed an opportunity to break through the impasse we were facing. Continue reading

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS & ACRONYMS FOR DIGITAL LITERACIES AT UAL (DRAFT)

GLOSSARY OF TERMS & ACRONYMS FOR DIGITAL LITERACIES AT UAL (DRAFT 5/6/13)

In the DIAL project year one evaluation report we found an issue of “structural presentation and communication beyond DIAL’s immediate interlocutors within UAL and beyond JISC.  There is a tendency to assume a shared understanding of terminology and of decisions to change use: for example ‘open educational resources’ have at different times been called ‘open education’ and ‘open resources’.” (Year one DIAL Evaluation Report Duna Sabri October 2012).

 In response to this evaluation finding DIAL created an ‘open education at UAL‘ web page which was used for UAL promotion/communication for the OER13 conference. A GLOSSARY OF TERMS was also a recommended at the final DIAL advisory board meeting; please see a full GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS below. If you’d like to comment, edit, add or contribute to this list please do or contact: Chris Follows c.follows@arts.ac.uk

GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS UAL DIAL (DRAFT)

 

Acronym/Term

Description

DIAL / Digital Integration into Arts Learning The DIAL project partially funded by JISC Developing Digital Literacies Programme, is a two-year project (November 2011 to December 2013) at the University of the Arts London. http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk
JISC / Joint Information Systems Committee The JISC are a registered charity and work on behalf of UK higher education, further education and skills to champion the use of digital technologies.
DL / Digital Literacies Digital Literacies: There are many different levels and types of DLs, these can be interest, discipline, subject, social, cultural, process and practice etc. specific.

 

Digital Literacies: UAL practice (DIAL working definition)

 

Self-identified digital skills and attributes needed to support personal and professional digital practice, ranging from awareness and participation, application of good practice through to participation in emergent and innovative digital practices.

Practice Practice: a general term referring to the personal and professional work being carried out within a specialist area or activity. We also use practice along side other key terms like ‘open practice’, please see below:

  • Personal: Outside work or institutional constraints (Home life)
  • Professional: Artistic work, discipline specialism creative practice (arts/design studio practice, creative industries)
  • Academic: Learning & Teaching (staff work)
  • Technical: Learning and teaching (staff work)
  • Educational: course study, research and working within a specialism(s) (student work).
  • Open: See OP and OEP below
Open Any online content, from text, images, video, comments etc. which are openly available online to view or download without the need to login or join.
OP / Open Practice Individuals and groups who share personal and professional practice online through participatory blogs and online community networks. Content (resources & ideas) are mostly unrestricted to access and freely downloadable for use and reuse, content is openly licensed using creative commons or similar (see below). 
OEP / Open educational Practice Those open practices specifically related to educational activities.
CC – Creative Commons An open licensing system to provide content creators option to add specific use guidelines to their content whilst retaining their intellectual property rights on the content/item, e.g. CC BY you can download & use my video, but please attribute me.
Hard Skills / DLs ‘How to skills’ that can be learned through training or viewing instructional videos.  Hard skills are more tangible and explicit than soft skills and are easily codified. e.g. use Photoshop, edit a video
Soft Skills / DLs Soft skills can be harder to codify than soft skills, they are hidden and more difficult to make explicit or make sense of.  They can be relational skills, the way we do something or have learnt to do something over time, through iterative processes and practice.  They are complex and emergent, they can only be understood or communicated sometimes in retrospect.
OER / Open educational resources  “OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others. Open educational resources include full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, streaming videos, tests, software, and any other tools, materials, or techniques used to support access to knowledge.” Hewlett Foundation
CoP / Communities of practice “Communities of practice are formed by people who engage in a process of collective learning in a shared domain of human endeavor: A clique of pupils defining their identity in the school, a network of surgeons exploring novel techniques…. Communities of practice are groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly”. Etienne Wenger
VLE / Virtual learning environment At UAL our VLE was Blackboard, this has now been replaced by a new VLE environment including Moodle and its related UAL tools, blogs, e-portfolios and process.arts, see VLE map here (these tools are also defined below)
MOOC / Massive Open Online Course MOOCs are large free open online courses; some MOOC’s are more ‘open’ than others.  Anyone can enroll or join a MOOC and users follow/take part in the course remotely without paying a fee for participation.  Some MOOCs are self directed and some involve the support of a teacher, however, in bery large courses support is typically minimal.  Peer networking and support can be an important aspect of some MOOCs. Some MOOCs offer accreditation for a fee. Mini MOOC is a small version of a MOOC.
CLTAD / Centre for Learning & Teaching in Art & Design CLTAD provides professional development and support to University of the Arts London staff in learning and teaching, develops and assists the implementation of technology to support learning, undertakes and supports pedagogic research, and contributes to the strategic development of learning and teaching across the institution.
OD&L / Organisational Development and Learning UALs Organisational Development and Learning formally Development and learning. This is the staff-training department at UAL, which includes Learn IT.
process.arts http://process.arts.ac.uk is an open practice community sharing arts, design, practice & research worldwide.  The site is open to anyone to encourage open communities of practice between individuals, groups, and institutions worldwide. The site offers a rich media/social media experience to sharing arts practice, users are encouraged to openly share and use creative commons licensed content and support others in doing the same.
SCORE / Support centre for open resources in education. The aims of the SCORE Fellowship provided to Chris Follows by the Open University were to explore relationships between traditional arts practice and OER practice including: use and reuse of OER, best processes and practices, OER communities, inter-college collaborations and the development of an open Arts-UKOER community of practice.
ALTO l Arts Learning and Teaching Online ALTO was a project funded by JISC to develop the capacity of the UAL to participate in the rapidly developing open educational community movement. ALTO focused on developing institutional infrastructure and capacity to engage in open educational practice. The online tools and websites that compose the ALTO infrastructure can be found at http://alto.arts.ac.uk.
File Store Filestore is the name for the University’s open educational resources file sharing and storage tool. Visit the filestore site for more information.
my.blog.arts A teaching and learning blogging community at http://myblog.arts.ac.uk; is a learning and teaching collaborative blogging service for UAL staff and students, blogs range from from personal reflection to project group blogs. Could you add a sentence on what it might it be used for?
Workflow ePortfolio Mahara based ePortfolio platform at http://workflow.arts.ac.uk; its used by many staff and students at UAL to present learning and teaching, course work and professional eportfolios to the world Could you add a sentence on what it is used for?
UAL / University of the Arts London Six distinctive and distinguished Colleges make up University of the Arts London: – http://www.arts.ac.uk
CCA Camberwell College of Arts
CSM Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design
CCAD Chelsea College of Art and Design
LCC London College of Communication
LCF London College of Fashion
WCA Wimbledon College of Art.
CCW Camberwell College of Arts, Chelsea College of Art and Design and Wimbledon College of Art.

 

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Digital Literacies & arts practice

The DIAL project has taken two approaches in ‘Defining of Digital literacies at UAL’ all based on the DIAL project findings from staff and student projects to date, these will be clearer once the project has been fully evaluated in July 2013. The DIAL projects scope and objectives will be our primarily focus therefore the DIAL report on DLs will be mainly ‘employability’ specific, graduate attributes for example. DIAL will also make more general recommendations and observations in terms of ‘future work’ required for UAL in addressing other DLs, of which there are many.  Continue reading

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POI Programme – IP and Creative Commons Sessions Feedback

In April and May we finally saw the launch of DIAL Professional Online Identities project (POI). A series of talks, workshops, drop-in sessions and other activities have been organised and are still running as part of the POI programme.

Please see some of the feedback below, gathered during the workshops:

A mystery revealed – Copyright, design, trademark and patents

Creative Commons – sharing and promoting your work online

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA      IMG-20130503-00083
Silvia Baumgart has led the Project and it has been organised together with the Centre of Performance Course. The sessions were scheduled for the 3rd and 15 of May 2013 – CSM. Continue reading

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Organisational Development and Learning working in partnership with DIAL

Please see notes below from Anna Petts Head of UALs Organisational Development and Learning OD&L. The meeting with Anna, Christine Kelly from Learn IT and myself was a welcome and timely opportunity to reflect on the Professional On-line Identities project (POI) collaborative work DIAL, SEE and Learn IT have been involved in over the past year and a half. Continue reading

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Digital literacies for open education

DIAL have been working closely with open education projects and developments across the university exploring the link between open practice and open digital literacies. DIAL are releasing all its resources as open educational resources (OERs).  DIAL are currently in the process of mapping the UALs ‘hidden’ open education landscape, during the past two years DIAL has identified many individuals practicing mostly voluntary open educational innovation across the university, see some UAL sites here. Continue reading

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DIAL notes from the JISC Learning and Teaching experts meeting 23/04/2013

First time I’d been to a JISC Learning and Teaching experts meeting, it was great to hear all about all the JISC activities and progress across the various JISC programmes. I was pleased to hear JISC have some new programmes being developed ‘Student engagement’, ‘MOOCS’ and the Changing landscape, DIAL has explored all these areas in collaboration with other projects and departments across the UAL so we’ll be interested to see how/if DIAL work aligns with these new programmes. Continue reading

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Professional Identities Workshop

Reflections on the First Workshop on Professional Identites. 

You cannot present to others what you have not presented to yourself: Papert

IMG_1349The purpose of these early workshops in the On-Line Professional Identities Project was to enable the participants to think about their outward facing identity, specifically in terms of their professional profiles. To consider what that identity might be before engaging with the how of putting an identity into an online platforms or engaging with technology.
Lego Serious Play is a powerful methodology for reflecting on and evaluating Individual identity, and extracting core values or simple guiding principles. The workshop followed a clearly defined structure, beginning with skills building and introduction of metaphor. At the core of the process is a simple strategy whereby everybody builds, everybody makes meaning and everybody shares. This activity is repeated three times. Firstly the participants build, from a rich pre-selected inventory of Lego bricks, their identity as they perceive it today. IMG_1351By handling the material and configuring it they make meaning that is individually shared as a story behind the model they have built. Secondly they are asked to build a new model which is how other see them and to consider how it attaches to the first model and what impact it has on the first Core Model. Finally they are asked to build a new third model that expresses, for them, their identity on the future. Lastly they are asked to place the two models in relation to each other and to extract from the last model what is the essential core identity of the future. They are asked to consider the distance between the two identities and what might be need to close that gap. These are written down and the participants take this way.

IMG_1352
The group were given a short introduction into the concept of identity as explained by Henri Tajfel, that the identity consists of two aspects: PERSONAL consisting of characteristics, traits, preferences, attributes. And SOCIAL or RELATIONAL which derives from our knowledge of belonging to a certain group, which offers emotional value and social significance.
The group of 10 stage 2 and 3 students all engaged completely with the process and the idea of creating metaphor to make meaning. While some initial models were sometimes rich and demonstrated a deep understanding of current identity, many were strongly located in experiences and life story rather than concepts of identity such as values and attributes. Surprisingly the students responded extremely well in closing this gap in the subsequent building rounds.
In the next Workshop I will address this by including more information on the powerpoint slide that frames the first and subsequent activities.
Participants take away a post-it with their perception of a core aspirational external identity. How will this impact on their development of an on-line identity?

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Notes from kick off meetings ‘Understanding digital literacies at UAL

We kicked off the first ‘Understanding digital literacies at UAL definitions and competencies’ meetings at UALs High Holborn office, everyone enjoyed the debate and it was a great opportunity to have an open discussion about the issues. We’d like to hear as many voice as possible to contribute to this forum and we’d like to arrange the next meetings at each of the six colleges. If you’d like to host a meeting at your college please suggest a date and a venue so we can start to arrange this with you? Continue reading

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Confessions of a DIAL Coordinator blog

Screen Shot 2013-03-04 at 14.37.22Confessions of a DIAL coordinator  blog documents the journey of Rossella Emanuele and Kaye Pryce in their new role of DIAL coordinators. It has the format of a journal of their individual journeys; it aims to be resource material for tracking the developments and identifying future potentialities for this role.

To find out more about RE and KP journey please check future posts as we will be posting a monthly update. http://confessionsofadialcoordinator.myblog.arts.ac.uk/

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DIAL projects and activities

Screen Shot 2013-03-04 at 14.34.46The DIAL project provides individuals, project teams, courses, conference groups or communities of interest a place to cluster groups of user generated content together, group forums can also be created. Users outside UAL can create accounts and fully contribute to the groups. Groups require primary initiator/s to help set up and steward (support and build) the community of practice, the more active groups will be featured on the front page and on this list. When adding resources please choose a group if relevant from the drop down tab. If you would like to propose a DIAL group on process.arts you would like to create and manage please see http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/expressions-of-interest/ DIAL list of projects and activities – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/dial-projects-and-activities

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Video presentation skills workshops – an overview

Our objective for the DIAL online presentation skills community was to work out ways of developing video presentation skills with students.

Working with Chitra Buckley, the course director of MA Fashion Entrepreneurship at the London College of Fashion, we are aiming to create a workshop that will help students develop their presentation and pitching skills by recording themselves on a video camera doing a one-minute elevator pitch to explain their business idea or project. The pilot took place in the run up to defining the MA Fashion Entrepreneurship students’ final projects and to help in constructing a pitch for their own digital identity.

A wider aim is to provide a workshop outline and supporting materials that others can use to teach these skills to other students.

We are also collaborating with SEE, particularly with Student Development Officer Pei-Chin Tay, who is developing training material on how to make a great video pitch for the SEED Fund, and Speaking Out, a social enterprise that I run to help develop public speaking confidence.

A key part of the project was the collaboration between academic staff and the partner organisations. Chitra was devising a structure for presentation skills as part of her PGCert. We then developed the sessions further, in association with partners such as SEE, in relation to the elevator pitching, and Speaking Out for the exercises to improve presentation confidence and skills, with DIAL providing the digital literacy skills angle. Chitra also facilitated the sessions and developed the feedback sheets. This interaction between the partners was essential to the success of the project.

The following sections describe the series of three workshops that we ran, with the intention that other facilitators can run similar workshops themselves. There are a number of things we learned and things that we’d do differently included!

Preparation

Preparation for the video presentation skills workshop

Workshop 1 – trying out video pitching

Workshop 1, part 1 – filming one minute video pitches without training
Workshop 1, part 2 – watching the video pitches on a big screen

Workshop 2 – video pitch training and practice

Workshop 2, part 1 – training on how to do a video elevator pitch
Workshop 2, part 2 – exercises to practice video presentations

Workshop 3 – peer feedback 

Workshop 3 – Peer feedback on the before and after videos

Videos

Video demonstrating how to teach the workshop

Lessons learned

Video presentation skills workshop – lessons learned

More details about the online presentation skills project and the project plan.

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Professional Online Identities (POI) workshops/programme

After meeting with Learn IT and SEE we concluded that a good approach we’d like to try is to offer some training/focus group sessions to programme/course staff and also the project staff. The idea being that we use this training time to talk about the various activities we’re asked the students to undertake, learn more about this ourselves if necessary and then discuss at the end of the session how we can best support these areas for students/staff on the course (alternatively we can look at how to offer training to staff and students together in future sessions). The DIAL project would like to explore how we take staff and students along together, so not focusing on one or the other too much.

Michael and Fred staff form the CSM Performance Design and Practice subject area have confirmed the dates which fit into their time-tables, we are now starting to use these dates to plan the training/activities and workshops as we discussed.

  • Chrissy & Learn IT- Twitter – Blogging/wordpress – Social – Web/tools development – Basic code – Privacy – open source – drupal ??
  • Katie & SEE – OWN-IT/copyright IPR (Silvia Baumgart ) – employer engagement – business/industry survey/participant call out – ??
  • Chris & DIAL – In house platforms – external platforms – open source/drupal web development – Creative commons – presence/physical and virtual – Ego – sharing online

CHALLENGE: The project is about identifying challenges for staff as much as for students, we are trying to fit this into a very busy and already over stretched course and team schedule. Not all course staff during term time will be able to participate in this project or come to the training sessions because most staff contracted time is already filled with teaching and admin. Offering project activities/training to the all staff and students is out of the scope of this project as it could get very complicated.

ACTION: We hope by involving two key staff members (who have offered their time) together with the project team, we hope to develop some resources to share online with other staff and students from the course and beyond.

As part of the online identities work and other DIAL workshops we would like to use the lego serious play in workshops and training sessions, Identified by Fred and supported by Alison James. See Fred’s blog post here – http://csmdigitalbaseline.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/11/27/this-is-the-real-me-fredmeller/

 

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Meeting and survey notes for online identities project

The DIAL project met today with staff and students of the Performance Design and Practice course/subject area at Central Saint Martins. I met with around 65, 1st, 2nd and 3rd year students and course staff and had 15 to 20 minutes to introduce the new Developing Professional Online Identities project which we hope to pilot with this cohort.

Project Aim: The project will identify and develop specific digital literacies/hard and soft skills (Presentation/Relational skills see image) in maintaining professional online identities with the aim of enhancing student/graduate employability and industry readiness. The project will focus on developing independence and confidence in web development, online professional practice, open source use, participatory/online communities and digital citizenship.

The first question asked by the course director to the students was; ‘is this a useful, worth while project, are you interested’? There was a clear and positive agreement this was very welcome.

Identity/practice communication and your online identities

The Professional Online Identities project is essentially about communication, how we communicate and consume data, data that communicates who we are and what we do. It was important to introduce this project physically face to face with the students and staff at CSM, the physical element of this project has to be remembered and acknowledged as important as the digital/virtual, understanding this balance in online communication is fundamental to its success  we will be using Lego serious play early in this project.

I started the presentation by asking if anyone objected to me taking a photo f the group to be posted online, I gave people the opportunity to look away or let me know if they did not want to be in photo if they wanted (no one objected).  This helped kick off this session as the simple act of taking a group photo, in this context highlights a few questions about the rules of the web, what are the rules or the digital etiquette of the web and who makes these rules and which do we follow? I obtained permission but should I have requested they sign a more formal release form? This would take time and maybe be too formal. My photography skills are not the greatest as you can see and this also brings up the question of quality, do we trust others to represent us? We had an interesting discussion at DIALs recent Improving Your Prospects through Online Profiles panel discussion where the question of course identity was raised as a concern for some of UALs course leaders/directors in terms of students adding their work to Showtime http://showtime.arts.ac.uk/ , the University’s free online platform where graduates can present their work and creative practice. Some course directors were concerned about having the ‘right’ students work being associated with their course, e.g. they didn’t want the poorer work to be directly/publicly associated to their course in this ‘open’ way.

Then how do we manage our Professional Online Identities (POI), especially if others are adding and contributing to our POI. This is particularly the case in the creative industries sector where POIs are important to practice, your practice may be discussed, commented on by anyone and/or media or industry may write about you and your work. If you are actively updating and communicating your practice online does this make it easier to communicate or not?

Is there a balance we need to explore between how we engage, add and contribute to/with our POI:

  1. Do we do nothing about your POI (be as anonymous as possible, don’t engage), there are three aspects to this to consider (less control over your POI and digital footprint)

1. I don’t want to be online in anyway. I want to be anonymous!

2. I don’t have the skills to engage or create a POI

3. I’m too busy to be online, happy to let others write about or represent me or create my POI e.g. (the public, agents, collectors, employers, fans, media, galleries etc.)

  1. And/or actively engage and create our POI, fully engage. (More control over your POI and digital footprint)

We don’t have the answers to these questions and this project aims to explore these issues and more. We hope to ask many questions and work them out together over the next few months.

Students were asked if interested in this project to express an interest by filling out this form, they were asked to, Identify which one of the 4 self-selecting groups you feel you relate to you’ 90% of the group responded instantly with an expression of interest:

Unaware – not familiar with professional online identities. I am interested to find out more or I don’t want online identities

Aware – familiar with professional online identities but not in professional practice and/or not sure about its relevance

Starter – Starting to practice with professional online identities, still lots to learn, would like to learn more

Confident practitioner – developing professional online identities daily and supporting others

Which hard and soft skills do we need?

Students were also asked in the survey which direction this project should take, ‘where should this project be focusing in terms of developing support, advice, research and training?

To date DIAL have identified the following areas and these were given as suggestions, students expressed an interest in all the following areas:

Additional suggestions included;

  • Employability.
  • Hard skills, technicality, Information about Opportunity to learn.
  • How to build websites. / Create my website (Professional)
  • How to Code.
  • Presenting work that represents me and what I do.
  • Languages of communication, email/social network etiquette.

After the session as I was leaving I saw this piece of work in the CSM foyer, must be a sign! Central Banner by Eva Yarza Hilario.

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Social Media at UAL

On Monday 10 December I attended a Social Media Workshop at London College of Fashion by Claire Tomlins (PhD, CSM, 2010) who talked about where social media is being applied in corporate branding, something I was not to familiar with and it was refreshing to hear a sector/college/subject specific debate, and not overly corporate. There was also a presentation from Cemanthe Harries founder of New Media Angels (who’s work is very much like a digital steward), who provides social media training to businesses. www.newmediaangels.com/, Cemanthe gave a non-academic outlook on the subject addressing the differences she has found between traditional advertising and social media advertising. Everyone in the room found this fascinating and useful insight into real world practices, students commented that this is what they would like to see more of in future workshops.

There was an interesting mix of Staff, students, PhD, MA students and researchers. its not the first social media event I’ve been to at UAL and I’ve also had lots of conversations with individuals throughout UAL. At the end of this session the group talked about forming a LCF/UAL social media group, there was no real conclusion for how we could do this so through DIAL I offered to create a social media group on process.arts to try and bring all these different social media groups together please see and contribute to the new Social Media at UAL group here – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/social-media-ual

Original ad below - http://newsevents.arts.ac.uk/event/social-media-workshops/

Attention social media researchers, MA and PhD students, from across UAL are invited to take part in a lively workshop with the objective being to form a UAL group specialising in social media.

With increasing social media application and interest in academic and business, this workshop will consider the following questions:

  • What is social media to you?
  • Which social media platforms are you researching?
  • Which platforms do you find most relevant in art and design?
  • Where social media is useful in the research process.

There will be a presentation from Cemanthe Harries founder of New Media Angels, who provides social media training to businesses. www.newmediaangels.com/ will provide a non-academic outlook on the subject addressing the differences she has found between traditional advertising and social media advertising.

Claire Tomlins (PhD, CSM, 2010) will talk on where social media is being applied in corporate branding.

Researchers will present their research interests and topic for 5 minutes.

There will then be an hour of lively discussion on key subject areas found within the first hour of presentations.

Students, staff and researchers from across the University are welcome, however space is limited to 25 places. Please RSVP to Luella Allen (l.allen@fashion.arts.ac.uk)

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Call for Student DIALogue digital researchers

CCAD students in the canteen

Following the success of the DIAL student surveys (Six students + Six colleges) the DIAL project would like to identify and work with a group of six students (ongoing) one students from each college. The student researchers will work with DIAL as a student DIAL presence in each college to research and gather opinion and feedback from staff and students ? DIAL would like feedback on topics related to the DIAL objectives and active, ongoing, new and emerging DIAL projects.

Six students will be paid between four to six hours weekly (for a short period up to 2 to 3 months each time) through artstemps. The DIALogue digital researchers would feed back their findings weekly via post and comments on all the DIAL baseline blogs and take part in regular ‘DIAL operational group’ meetings.

If you are interested in being a Student DIALogue digital researcher please email Chris Follows – c.follows@arts.ac.uk . Please say why you’d be interested in being a ‘Student DIALogue digital researcher’ and which college you would be interested in taking part, does not have to be the college your studying at ?

Posted in Baselining, Communities of Practice, Dissemination | Leave a comment

CCW Technical Staff Away Day at the Imperial War Museum

DIAL presentation at the first All-CCW Technical Staff Away Day held at the Imperial War Museum London

YouTube Preview Image

Download slides here – http://www.slideshare.net/ProcessArts/tech-away-day

Links here – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/12/04/dial-project-highlight-report-291112/

DIAL Project Highlights This Period

•WP 3: DIAL team Link
•WP3: DIAL projects activity: Active, ongoing, new and emerging projects link
•WP5: DIAL Project Blog Link
•WP6: Ongoing Baseline Link 1 & Link 2
•WP6: Focus & discussion group meetings Link
•WP6: DIAL Evaluation Report Year 1 Link
•WP7: Resources & OERs Link
•WP8: Project Dissemination Link
•WP8: DIAL blog as resource/support sector collaboration: Glasgow School of Link 1 & Link 2
•WP9: Senior Management and Strategy Link
•WP9: DIAL at the heart of UALs new digital strategy Link
•WP9: National press interest in our projects Link
•WP9: Creative & Cultural Skills involvement in projects

Project Key Activities Due Next Period

•DIAL cannot be the lone project on digital literacy. UAL focus group Understanding digital literacies definitions & competencies Link
•Student DIALogue reps – Following on from the success of the arts temps student surveys we will be trialing a similar more in-depth approach of the Six students in Six colleges pilot Link (student engagement)
•DIAL, Learn-IT, CLTAD & SEE are developing a joint pilot project addressing Professional Online Identities; UAL students & staff Link
•Two new 0.5 part time DIAL coordinators posts next year.
•Demonstrating impact to the institution in terms of communicating ‘tangible benefits’ taking into the following year one evaluation findings (new awareness and expertise is seeing communities as resources).
Other:
•How can DIAL continue to encourage engagement & participation but also manage expectation & maintain the capacity to support sustainable growth? Not be the lone project on digital literacy.
•CCskills commission Creative & Cultural Skills Research Proposal Link
•Address equipment needs
•Other Risks Link
Posted in DIAL updates, Dissemination | 1 Comment

DIAL Project Highlight Report – 29/11/12

DIAL Project Highlights This Period

•WP 3: DIAL team Link
•WP3: DIAL projects activity: Active, ongoing, new and emerging projects link
•WP5: DIAL Project Blog Link
•WP6: Ongoing Baseline Link 1 & Link 2
•WP6: Focus & discussion group meetings Link
•WP6: DIAL Evaluation Report Year 1 Link
•WP7: Resources & OERs Link
•WP8: Project Dissemination Link
•WP8: DIAL blog as resource/support sector collaboration: Glasgow School of Link 1 & Link 2
•WP9: Senior Management and Strategy Link
•WP9: DIAL at the heart of UALs new digital strategy Link
•WP9: National press interest in our projects Link
•WP9: Creative & Cultural Skills involvement in projects

Project Key Activities Due Next Period

•DIAL cannot be the lone project on digital literacy. UAL focus group Understanding digital literacies definitions & competencies Link
•Student DIALogue reps – Following on from the success of the arts temps student surveys we will be trialing a similar more in-depth approach of the Six students in Six colleges pilot Link (student engagement)
•DIAL, Learn-IT, CLTAD & SEE are developing a joint pilot project addressing Professional Online Identities; UAL students & staff Link
•Two new 0.5 part time DIAL coordinators posts next year.
•Demonstrating impact to the institution in terms of communicating ‘tangible benefits’ taking into the following year one evaluation findings (new awareness and expertise is seeing communities as resources).
Other:
•How can DIAL continue to encourage engagement & participation but also manage expectation & maintain the capacity to support sustainable growth? Not be the lone project on digital literacy.
•CCskills commission Creative & Cultural Skills Research Proposal Link
•Address equipment needs
•Other Risks Link
Posted in Activity & progress, Baselining, Dissemination | 1 Comment

All-in-one UAL digital literacy blog activity

See all-in-one UAL digital literacy blog activity at:
http://www.netvibes.com/dialproject#UAL_digital_literacies

Posted in Activity & progress, Baseline report, Definitions, DIAL links | Leave a comment

E-Learning Strategy Group (ELSG)

DIAL attended the E-Learning Strategy Group (ELSG), as well as hearing a concise overview and update of all the current E-Learning developments & contacts at UAL that DIAL could be involved in or benefit from, it was also an opportunity to highlight current and new DIAL projects and feed back some of the experiences and lessons learned.

Matters arising included Sharing E-learning Practice. Really important and great to hear there is an active call out for this , it also gave DIAL the opportunity to share our project perspectives on:

How can we encourage more sharing online with a wider variety of participants ? May of the projects and activities at UAL are not being communicated as efficiently as they could. DIAL mentioned although DIAL have a very active online presence and dissemination its still difficult to get the message out to a wider audience. It was noted by Charlotte Webb who was one of the panel of six speakers who discussed their experiences of creating online identities, using social media and specialist networks, and being a digital citizen. Charlotte said this presentation format ‘road show’ style events were a great way of communicating projects, tools and e-learning concepts and to get quality feedback from staff and students.

The  ‘Delivery of technical resource information online‘ highlighting sustainable development methods for encouraging staff in ‘being online’ (sometimes with resistance and for the first time). DIAL have explored how staff take ownership of presenting their resource/course areas key information online and how this can enhance CPD and provide new pathways into future e-learning engagement.

Jo Morrison presented an update on the CSM Digital Present a new blog supporting digital literacy at CSM. This blog is a great source of college led/gernerated information and is and will be a very useful case study and example of best practice in addressing and exploring digital literacy in an embed and sustainable way in colleges. Lots of Jo’s case studies and experience will help inform our DIAL led UAL wide focus group meeting starting in January exploring  UAL specific issues around ‘Understanding digital literacies at UAL definitions and competencies‘. The group aims to debate and draw up collective ideas about how best to map digital literacies across UAL as a whole with an aim of understanding how UAL communicate art specific digital literacy definitions/ideas and competencies.

We hope to feedback early findings from this focus group at future E-Learning Strategy Group meetings.

Posted in Dissemination, Senior Management and Strategy | Tagged | Leave a comment

Today’s online identities panel schedule and links to all presentations

Enterprise Week 12-16 November 2012 – Improving Your Prospects through Online Profiles

Post debate we have now set up this forum aims to encourage and continue the lively and constructive debate and presentations which took place at LCC on 15/11/2012 part of UALs enterprise week, see more about this event here – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/improving-your-prospects-through-online-profiles

 

Some of the key takeaway points based on responses from the students in the audience, we’ve created the following as forum topics :

Improve online visibility

Better interaction with you online visitors

Understanding online copyright and IP issues

How to build your own online spaces and networks

Protecting personal data and privacy online

 

Date: 15 November 2012 Time: 3pm – 5pm Location: Street Lecture Theatre, LCC, SE1 6SB

Event details: #EW_UAL
A panel of speakers will discuss and debate these questions and share their experiences of creating online identities, using social media and specialist networks, and being a digital citizen.

How the debate be structured?
3 pm Introduction and event context Chris Follows – See presentation Short URLhttp://goo.gl/M15Xh
3:10 Debate 1: Chair: Clare KennedyPresentation of practice (What you’ve done), work and profile, UAL tools and social media
3:15 Presentation 1: See presentation short URL – http://goo.gl/Bf9I6Clare Kennedy is a member of the UAL Digital Team which created Showtime [linking to http://showtime.arts.ac.uk/ ], the University’s free online platform where graduates can present their work and creative practice. Showtime has evolved over the past four years from an online representation of the UAL degree shows into a platform which is viewed as a directory of talent by gallerists, fashion houses and other creative industry insiders.
3:20 Quick questions
3:25 Presentation 2: See presentation- short URL – http://goo.gl/VLUvOAdam Watling Since joining LCF as Graduate Employment Officer, Adam has forged key relationships with influential fashion industry brands including ASOS, Arcadia, Kurt Geiger, Adidas, H&M and Jaeger, to name but a few. Through LCF’s online platform First Move, Adam has assisted graduates seeking work in many roles including Design, Buying, Merchandising, Fashion PR, Marketing and Journalism as well as other key roles within the industry.
3:30 Quick questions
3:35 Presentation 3: See presentation short URL – short URL – http://goo.gl/3rvDECharlotte Webb is an artist and PhD student at Chelsea College of Art & Design. Her PhD title is ‘Working with other others: artistic production and agency in a post-user environment’. She will talk about her online artistic identity as ‘Otheragent’, and her interest in automated online entities such as Twitter bots. http://www.otheragents.net/ http://otheragents.tumblr.com/
3:40 Quick questions
3:45 General Debate
4 pm Debate 2: Chair Chris Follows Relational identity (what you do); communicating practice, knowledge, skills and specialism online, how do we interact, participate and build professional profiles/identities online?
4:05 Presentation 4: See presentation short URL – http://goo.gl/0J1O4Chris Follows joined the University of the Arts London UAL in 2003 and since 2007 has been researching and developing open educational practice and open content communities.  Chris is the DIAL project manager ‘Digital Integration Into Arts Learning’ part of the JISC UK Developing digital literacies programme. Chris has recently completed a SCORE fellowship at the Open University and is the initiator of process.arts.ac.uk. http://process.arts.ac.uk/users/cfollows
4:10 Quick questions
4:15 Presentation 5: See presentation short URL – http://goo.gl/oLmrvJohn Jackson: John is an Educational Developer with a particular interest in digital platforms and practices, who has also worked as a business adviser (with a focus on eBusiness) in the earlier days of the internet. He is currently involved in a variety of projects and maintains a blog at http://elearning.myblog.arts.ac.uk/
4:20 Quick questions
4:25 Presentation 6: See presentationshort URL – http://goo.gl/7yRHLLuke Whitehead joined London College of Communications in September 2012 as Publicity and Social Media Co-ordinator. Previously he has worked on Digital and Social Media strategies for major UK charities including the NSPCC and Macmillan Cancer Support. He is fascinated by the humanising potential of digital and the role social media has in creating digital identities for individuals and organisations.
4:30 Quick questions
4:35 General Debate and final thoughts.
5 pm End but please continue the debate by adding your comments to this debate forum and contribute to our resource cluster of videos, images and text.

Invited guest audience members

Lucy Brown | Creative & Cultural Skills representitive | http://ccskills.org.uk/

Anna McAndrew | UAL alumni | Visual artist and musician studying Education at Goldsmiths | My self directed education | http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/my-self-directed-education.

For further details on DIAL’s new project that explores these issues, visit – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/developing-professional-online-identities-project-detailsDate: Thursday 15 November 2012

Time: 3pm – 5pm

Location: Podium Lecture Theatre, LCC, Elephant & Castle, SE1 6SB

Cost: Free, booking essential

Eligibility:Student or graduate

Online booking of events are only available to members.

Please log in or register as a new member.

Online booking of events are only available to members who meet the eligibility criteria.

Posted in Dissemination | Tagged | 1 Comment

DIAL proud sponsors of the ‘Digital’ Creative Enterprise Award

Very best wishes to all the nominees for Creative Enterprise Awards 2012 good luck from the DIAL team proud sponsors of the ‘Digital’ category.

SEE will be hosting the fourth Creative Enterprise Awards at University of the Arts London as part of Enterprise Week 2012, to celebrate the enterprising activity of current students and recent graduates* (*Graduated no earlier than 2009)

The Creative Enterprise Awards 2012 are kindly sponsored by Natwest.

There are 6 categories of Awards:

  • Freelancer (sponsored by ArtsTemps)
  • New Business (sponsored by Natwest)
  • Enterprising Project (sponsored by UAL Short Courses)
  • Ethical or Social Enterprise (sponsored by Untld)
  • Digital (sponsored by DIAL)
  • International (sponsored by the Internation Centre)

APPLICATIONS FOR 2012 ARE NOW CLOSED – VIEW THE SHORTLIST HERE

Posted in Dissemination | Tagged | Leave a comment

Improving Your Prospects through Online Profiles

Enterprise Week 12-16 November 2012

For more information about this event http://see.arts.ac.uk/events/entweek/ or see event below:

Improving Your Prospects through Online Profiles

Date: 15 November 2012
Time: 3pm – 5pm

Location:
Podium Lecture Theatre, LCC, SE1 6SB

Event details:
Presenting your professional profile online is becoming increasingly important. What is the best way to develop your online professional identity? Do we improve or hinder our career prospects by being online?

A panel of speakers will discuss and debate these questions and share their experiences of creating online identities, using social media and specialist networks, and being a digital citizen.

This event is led by DIAL  ( http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk ) – UAL’s Digital Integration into Arts Learning project, which aims to improve graduate employability and develop confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students.

The debate will focus on two aspects of being online as a professional ‘Presentational‘ (presenting & promoting work online) and ‘relational’ (being participatory professional presenting practice and specialism online).

The debate will explore the challenges, limitations and benefits of how, what and why we use being online to build and enhance our careers:
How the debate be structured?

Introduction and event context – 10 min

Debate 1: Chair: Clare Kennedy

Presentation of practice (What you’ve done), work and profile, UAL tools and social media

Number of 5 min presentations from our panel (20 min total)
Audience debate – 20 – 30.

Debate 2: Chair Chris Follows

Relational identity (what you do); communicating practice, knowledge, skills and specialism online, how do we interact, participate and build professional profiles/identities online?
Number of 5 min presentations from our panel (20 min total)
Audience debate – 20 – 30.

10 – 15 minutes of general debate and final thoughts.

Start and continue the debate by adding your comments to this debate forum and contribute to our resource cluster of videos, images and text.

Panel includes:

Clare Kennedy is a member of the UAL Digital Team which created Showtime [linking to http://showtime.arts.ac.uk/ ], the University’s free online platform where graduates can present their work and creative practice. Showtime has evolved over the past four years from an online representation of the UAL degree shows into a platform which is viewed as a directory of talent by gallerists, fashion houses and other creative industry insiders.

Chris Follows joined the University of the Arts London UAL in 2003 and since 2007 has been researching and developing open educational practice and open content communities.  Chris is the DIAL project manager ‘Digital Integration Into Arts Learning’ part of the JISC UK Developing digital literacies programme. Chris has recently completed a SCORE fellowship at the Open University and is the initiator of process.arts.ac.uk. http://process.arts.ac.uk/users/cfollows

Luke Whitehead joined London College of Communications in September 2012 as Publicity and Social Media Co-ordinator. Previously he has worked on Digital and Social Media strategies for major UK charities including the NSPCC and Macmillan Cancer Support. He is fascinated by the humanising potential of digital and the role social media has in creating digital identities for individuals and organisations.

Adam Watling Since joining LCF as Graduate Employment Officer, Adam has forged key relationships with influential fashion industry brands including ASOS, Arcadia, Kurt Geiger, Adidas, H&M and Jaeger, to name but a few. Through LCF’s online platform First Move, Adam has assisted graduates seeking work in many roles including Design, Buying, Merchandising, Fashion PR, Marketing and Journalism as well as other key roles within the industry.

Charlotte Webb is an artist and PhD student at Chelsea College of Art & Design. Her PhD title is ‘Working with other others: artistic production and agency in a post-user environment’. She will talk about her online artistic identity as ‘Otheragent’, and her interest in automated online entities such as Twitter bots. http://www.otheragents.net/ http://otheragents.tumblr.com/

John Jackson: John is an Educational Developer with a particular interest in digital platforms and practices, who has also worked as a business adviser (with a focus on eBusiness) in the earlier days of the internet. He is currently involved in a variety of projects and maintains a blog at http://elearning.myblog.arts.ac.uk/

Invited guest audience members

Creative & Cultural Skills representitive | http://ccskills.org.uk/

Anna McAndrew | UAL alumni | Visual artist and musician studying Education at Goldsmiths | My self directed education | http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/my-self-directed-education.

For further details on DIAL’s new project that explores these issues, visit – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/developing-professional-online-identities-project-details

Date: Thursday 15 November 2012
Time: 3pm – 5pm
Location: Podium Lecture Theatre, LCC, Elephant & Castle, SE1 6SB
Cost: Free, booking essential

Eligibility:
Student or graduate

Online booking of events are only available to members.
Please log in or register as a new member.

Online booking of events are only available to members who meet the eligibility criteria.

Posted in Dissemination | Tagged | Leave a comment

Benefits of DIAL:

Benefits of DIAL inline with DIAL year 2 objectives.

1.    Institutional digital literacies/leadership (Digitally literate organisation)

1.1. Digital Terms and definitions

Support a cross college collaborative approach to policy and official terms associated to being a ‘digital literate university’ through referencing practice and active case studies:

Debate and define UALs institutional understanding of terms associated with ‘Digital literacies’ within all aspects creative practice, including media literacies, information literacies, digital practice, digital citizenship, online identities, digital/social/cultural competencies, participatory culture,    digital scholarship, digital attributes, open practice, digital fluency etc. with an aim of publishing an ‘institutional’ evidence base of UAL glossary of terms based on an iterative process of practical, subject and interest specific case study evidence. With reference to JISC definitions.

1.2. Engage and support maximum stakeholder participation and communication through the development and support of DIAL project communities of practice, including open debate/forum, cross college/alumni/industry interaction, course/staff/student level case studies, events, workshops and online resources.

1.3. Integrate DIAL initiatives and resources with internal and external departments through project collaboration.

1.4. Support a new mode of delivery for the PGCert course Open Educational Practice unit.

2. Digital competencies, development and training

Testing current structures and frameworks: DIAL supports a cross college collaborative approach to addressing staff & student key competencies required for integrating ‘digitally enhanced learning’ into everyday practice and to support new practices and modes of recording and delivering CPD & PPD training and support.

2.1. Digital leadership.

2.2. Challenges facing leaders, identifying similarities.

2.3. Staff & student DIAL support groups & peer support.

2.4. Self-assessment/Self-development materials.

2.5. Planning and undertaking – responsibility back on the individual

3. College and Institutional digital baseline: http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/digital-baseline-links/

3.1.Case studies, workshops, focus groups and surveys

  • Student perspectives.
  • Staff perspectives.
  • Best practice.
  • Identify Gaps.
  • Personal case studies/learning journeys.
  • Evidence base.
  • Curriculum case studies.
  • Teaching/curriculum digital integration.
  • Evidence and evaluation impact on curriculum development.

4. Employability; Encourage new perspectives and dialogue between universities and employers including, students, staff, employers, employer bodies and HE/FE institutions:

4.1. Stories from different perspectives through case studies.

4.2. What students, staff and employers want in terms of essential creative/digital attributes for employability.

4.3. Share/enhance digital expectations and awareness.

4.4. Raise aspirations, test the unknowns and influence change.

4.5. Develop bespoke course/subject/employer aligned key skill sets.

4.6. Digital practice evidence and examples of progressive practices.

4.7. Change process in and out, including curriculum.

4.8. Knowing and understanding expectations.

4.9. Promote entrepreneurism.

4.10. Identify digital change agents/Champions.

5.    Enhance institutional profile as a ’forward thinking institution’

5.1. Specialist in the field.

5.2. Open online presence

5.3. Sharing best practice

5.4. National and internationally recognised specialist mentors in digital practice.

5.5. Example of Sector feedback: http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/about-dial/#comment-10476

Just wanted to comment on how useful the DIAL ethos and resources have been in considering the development of our digital strategy here at GSA. We are currently engaging in student-centred research regarding digital literacies in order to inform a number of ongoing and participatory initiatives aimed at providing inclusive and flexible opportunities for both tutors and students to engage with emerging technologies. DIAL’s participative, forward-looking and integrated approach has highlighted the important areas of staff/ student collaboration, harnessing the power of mutually supportive practice communities and the merits of embedding relevant technology in purpose/subject-specific contexts. Resources related to planning, collaboration and implementation accessible on this blog as well as discussion with colleagues involved in the project have been incredibly he,pful in the formative stages of planning our priorities and approach.

Benefits of DIAL

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How to join UALs my.blog.arts and blog groups

View this video on YouTube – http://youtu.be/y9BM30WFDws

In this video we walk through the process of joining my.blog.arts and joining group blogs like the DIAL UAL baseline blogs – http://ualdigitalbaseline.myblog.arts.ac.uk/

YouTube Preview Image

Myblog.arts is UALs in house blogging service.

The digital baseline blogs are an ongoing agile project which rely on UAL staff and student contributions until November 2013; the blogs are open for all UAL staff and students to contribute. Please add your college, course or personal stories and perspectives of best practice or gaps you have identified in UAL’s current digital provision.

The ‘digital baseline’ blogs will record all aspects of digital life, including learning and teaching, college, department, course and individual perspectives.  It is a chance for us all to contribute, view and map how we at UAL are integrating the ‘digital’ into any aspects of our day-to day practice. The seven digital baseline blogs (6 college blogs and 1 institutional one) will give us an up-to-date snapshot of how we are integrating and supporting the digital in our practice.

UAL baseline

CCA baseline

CCAD baseline

CSM baseline

LCC baseline

LCF baseline

WCA baseline

Posted in Baseline report, Baselining | Leave a comment

A sustainable future for DIAL and a new ‘Digital Life’

I met with Shan Wareing (DIAL director) and Steve Howells‎ (Digital Life programme manager) today and we discussed the new UAL ‘Digital Life Programme’ download brief , a new institutional led digital programme/strategy (more details follow soon). I first met with Steve in June 2012 when Steve was in the first weeks of his post as Digital Life project manager. You can read about this meeting here – IT UAL and DIAL collaborations.

What we agreed:

Steve agreed to write an overview introduction blog post of the DIAL blog which, introduces the Digital Life programme, says how DIAL has informed the DL programme, what DL would like from DIAL, list the 5/6 gaps to address. The Digital Life Programme will also look at taking forward the DIAL baseline work to date, using the blogs and format that already exist – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/digital-baseline-links/ .

I agreed to review the DIAL objectives and rewrite the DIAL year 2 project plan and workpackages inline with the Digital Life programme objectives and needs. 

  1. Priority will be placed on the following collaborative ‘institutional’ objectives: (in collaboration with the DL programme and all involved projects, as the below are too large for DIAL to deal with alone and require as much input as possible from many perspectives as possible)
  2. Define the DL programmes use of the term ‘Digital literacies’
  3. DIAL will explore and seek institutional clarification (in collaboration with the DL programme and all involved projects) terms such as: Multimedia literacy, Media literacy, Computer literacy, Information literacy, New literacies,  Digital identity with an aim of publishing an ‘official’ UAL glossary of these institutional terms.
  4. Address staff key competencies required for integrating ‘digitally enhanced learning’ into everyday practice and to support CPD & PPD.
  1. DIAL will continue with the following KEY objectives with an aim of informing the DL programme from the following ‘Digital literacies’ perspective:
  2. Engage and support maximum stakeholder participation and communication between DIAL project communities of practice, including open debate/forum (live & online), cross college/alumni/industry interaction, course/staff/student level case studies, events, workshops and online resources.
  3. The DIAL project will encourage ‘open’ communities of practice and explore key issues surrounding the development of digitally enhanced learning.  DIAL will align this objective closely with the UAL Strategy 2010-15: Communities of Practice, people and communication priorities.
  4. Carry out interventions and case studies that enquire and inform change and development in individual practice and student engagement and that have potential to initiate course level curriculum change.
  5. Integrate DIAL initiatives and resources with the new Student Enterprise & Employability Service (SEE), bringing together the work of Creative Careers, the Enterprise Centre for the Creative Arts (ECCA), Artquest, Own-it and ArtsTemps.
  6. Explore key area of career preparation student/alumni representation online skills to create and present professional self; including online presentation skills, personal website development and online professional identities.
Posted in Activity & progress, Baselining, DIAL updates, Project Plan, Senior Management and Strategy | Tagged | 1 Comment

DIAL at ALT-C 2012

See presentation information, slides and recordings of DIAL of ALT-C 2012 - http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/tags/alt-c-dial

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Call for expressions of interest for DIAL small projects, support & case studies

UAL’s Digital Integration into Arts Learning (DIAL) project aims to carry out a small number of staff and student led projects and case studies, which will explore the pace of technological change and its impact on the day-to-day practices. As education merges in the rapidly expanding field of social and cultural technological change, maintaining progressive practice in these new digitally enhanced learning spaces can presents new expectations, anxieties and challenges for all.

DIALs key aims and objectives are to improve graduate employability and develop confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students. Individuals and project groups are invited to propose projects they would like to explore within DIALs overall objectives see here: http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/02/10/objectives/

The project method is to identify mutually supportive communities of staff and students within the larger university community (based on courses, disciplines or other naturally occurring communities) who identify goals for improving their collective digital literacies over a six month period, initially with significant support from the project team.  Over the project life-time, processes, resources and toolkits are being developed so the communities can be increasingly autonomous in their development programmes.  Within the community, individual and collective aims and anxieties will be identified, along with current skills and experience.  Community members will collaborate to increase the overall digital literacy of the whole community.

Please post your expression of interest to the DIAL blog, (please see how to post to the DIAL blog – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/how-join-dial-blog )

Your expression of interest (Max 1000 words) should include:

  • A brief overview of what you’d like to do.
  • Which stakeholders are involved or you’d like to engage? (Specific staff, student cohorts etc.)
  • What resources you’d develop (Resources can be a handbook, a community of practice, open education resources videos, image text handouts, a case study or a online unit)
  • What you aim to achieve at the end of the project/intervention (How will this benefit others in the future)?
  • Time frame and basic work plan (how this will fit into current work pattern)
  • Where you will be reporting, updates and adding resources produced during the development, DIAL would like to encourage use of the in-house tools including myblog.arts, workflow and process.arts.
  • What resources and support you will need, general guidance and support in developing digital practice, technical, community building, institutional support, support networks, funding (piloting digital equipment integration methods and practices, extra paid time support to develop a project, extra support from students paid through arts temps to support you project). Please note DIAL has limited funds and will only be able to offer small funding support to a limited number of projects.

Please email Chris Follows c.follows@arts.ac.uk for more details http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/

Download this as attachment here Call for interest DIAL projects

Posted in Communities of Practice | Leave a comment

Open Practice Workshop at SEDA Summer School, Tuesday 10 July

I was invited to run a session for the SEDA Summer School last week on Open Practice, the aim of which was to get participants thinking about the benefits and challenges of open practice, to develop the knowledge and attitudes needed in order to be more open, and to spread the word about open practice in their own institutions.

Image of post-it notes

Participants' next steps as identified at the end of the workshop

There were 24 participants and I took them through three activities where they thought about what constituted ‘open’ and ‘closed’ practice, why they share things and why they don’t, and then a worked example where they picked something they don’t currently share and found strategies to address the challenges to sharing. All three tasks (and all the resources, worksheets etc.) are available here: goo.gl/YZ1a3. The most powerful thing was, as the end of the workshop, I told them that I thought they might like to run something similar for staff in their own institutions so I’d shared all the resources under a public domain (Creative Commons Zero) license and they wouldn’t even have to attribute the stuff to me. Despite this being an example of everything we’d discussed over the past hour, most participants looked a little surprised at this. One said:

“I know this is what we’ve all just been learning about but… why would you do that?”
I replied: “because you all now think I’m wonderful”.

They laughed.

He said “but – honestly – is that enough?”

I asked him if he’d ever stood in front of 24 people who thought he was wonderful, and told him it felt amazing.

From chatting to the participants afterwards I got the sense that it was this moment that ‘flicked the switch’ for them.

The image shows participants’ ‘next steps’ from the workshop. Look past the couple of people who have resolved to start using Prezi and you’ll see the high proportion who have resolved to run similar workshops in their own institution and to practice in a more open way themselves… very heartwarming after only one hour!

Posted in Activity & progress, Dissemination, Open education (group) | Tagged | 3 Comments

Staff and student engagement in digital literacies, with UAL academic leaders, academics and students

(Post last updated 18/07/12) I was recently invited to present at the academic leaders forum 29 June 2012 in Chesnut (by invitation of the deputy Rector via a staff development forum meeting), this was an extremely timely opportunity to catch all the UAL academic leaders in one shot, UALs Rector, deputy Rector and students union President were also present. Before my presentation, I had the great pleasure of hearing the keynote presentation of Ronald Barnett on student engagement and the issues and challenges we all face now and in the future, Ron did a great Job of provoking thought and reflection and his ‘thinking aloud’ style presentation provided an interesting overview of a student’s perspective although not addressing the digital perspective as such.  As Ron talked I noted down key words/themes relating to student engagement which I thought could be flipped and easily identified as also being related to ‘staff & student engagement’ in terms of the DL challenges DIAL has identified to date:

In the break before my presentation I went to grab a quick cup of tea. I joined the queue for the tea/coffee machine and was eventually presented with a machine with several options, tea, coffee buttons to choose from. I had people waiting behind me and was feeling the pressure, after a few too many seconds of flapping my arms around and with a little help from the people in the queue I eventually came out with a green tea, which is a rarity given I normally end up with a ‘green tea cappuccino combo’.  This was my second digital challenge of that morning the first was using my iPhone map to find the venue and deciding if the distance shown was a walk or a taxi journey from the station or not, it looked like a walk to me on the map so I started, luckily I asked a local and he told me not to walk as it’s a longer walk than it looks and there’s lots of dangerous dual carriageways to cross on route, so I jumped a taxi.

I started my presentation with an early acknowledgement that we are all learning in this new digital space and are facing daily challenges. The presentation (an introduction to DIAL) slides and details can be seen here http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/academic-leaders-forum-29th-june

Feedback at the end of this presentation included:

You make me feel physically sick when I hear you talk … about using ‘digital’

One academic spoke out and said ‘he really is fearful of all things digital and declared himself as ‘digitally illiterate’ he went as far to say he felt physically sick when he has to engage with digital technology’.

This was exactly the group/individuals DIAL wanted to try and engage with, although it’s difficult to identify in individuals, as many people (especially academics) find it difficult to admit that digital is a problem for them. I had been hoping more of the forum participants would self identify, unfortunately no one else did. I asked anyone who would like support from DIAL to contact me, the academic who spoke out contacted DIAL and we have since met with his academic team. From this meeting, one of the course team has agreed to lead a project to explore with the course staff and students how they can make best use of UALs portfolio of new and developing VLE and online learning tools. At the request of course students the course leader would like to explore how best the course director and staff could better use online video course updates, to replace the conventional text updates.  DIAL will continue to support and engage with this course team throughout the project.

Other follow up meetings include:

Met up with Tim Williams to discuss new VLE and support tools also looked at all Tim’s learning videos and discussed ways we could share best practice in creating video support. Tim would like to support DIAL and is considering proposing a DIAL project. We looked at UAL use of video capture software and Camtasia – http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia.html

Other comments (DIAL would like to follow up on):

Staff would like to know more about the new VLE development and have the option to contribute.

DIAL have contacted CLTAD and the Moodle team and suggested a link to the new vle blog (info) is added to the front page of the current VLE blackboard. http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/01/29/moving-towards-moodle/

NEW VLE blog LINK – http://cltad-web.arts.ac.uk/lifeafterblackboard/

Tutor would like to explore what web platforms he could use to build a student community network and show work etc.

(Could do with exploring this and seeing what tools UAL has already)

Dial are currently starting some on the ground research and pilot exercises of how the tools UAL have and are developing can be used in all aspects of practice. We could run a similar DIAL exploration of these tools with the CCW tec teams?  The tools can be found on the staff myarts page via quick links:  These include -  http://myblog.arts.ac.uk/  http://workflow.arts.ac.uk/  http://process.arts.ac.uk/  And the new Moodle VLE  We could try and evaluate all these tools and then decide how best they can be used and if there are tools missing from this portfolio UAL need to consider.

Tutor would like to use a wiki for his course, he used to be able to use one before but UAL has stopped supporting wiki platforms.

- http://process.arts.ac.uk/ may be able to support this and a wiki function is being developed for posts – http://process.arts.ac.uk/forum/1894

Tutor would like to use streaming video in his course, how can UAL support this?

We could look at the work being done at LCC and LCF in this area – http://learningvideoguidelines.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/06/20/using-opencast-matterhorn-for-streaming-live-lectures/

 

Posted in DIAL pilot Groups, Dissemination, Meeting notes, Senior Management and Strategy | Tagged | 6 Comments

Meeting with CCSkills, SEE and DIAL

Katie Mills from SEE UAL Student Enterprise and employability and I had a very productive meeting with the CC Skills team on 27 June 2012.

Research proposal – bespoke research project on digital skills needs

The CC Skills team are really interested in the approach and areas DIAL are exploring in terms of defining todays graduates digital attributes, what hard and soft digital ‘skills’ do graduates need to know and practice in the 21st creative industries sector.

We would like to fund a collaborative commission between SEE, DIAL and CLTAD. The rough area or research approach we’d like to take is as follows:

Research what are the key digital attributes, hard and soft digital ‘skills’ a student needs and employer’s want.

1. We would like to commission research with: UAL students, staff and Alumni with an aim of compiling a clear overview and also draw out some key questions the stakeholders would like to ask employers.

Hard Skills: software applications, digital equipment, webmaking/development, digital tools etc.

Soft Skills: Relational skills (being/communicating online), building online communities, rich media use, experimental media, digital identities, digital citizenship, digital profiles, digital fluency, digital stewarding/support, managing digital life, marketing, social media strategies etc.

2. We would like to commission research with: CC Skills with their industry contacts and UAL industry contacts. Questions for this will be based on the research findings of the UAL consultations with UAL students, staff and Alumni.

Other notes:

Content sharing/cost-sharing between SEE, DIAL and Creative Choices

DIAL will link together with Ccskills amnd SEE to explore content sharing.

HE Skills Academy membership

Contact Head of Education Partnerships, Andy Levene, who leads on HE membership of our Skills Academy if we (UAL) are interested in discussing this further. Andy also led on our recent work looking at online learning resources (in this case for apprentices) so our paths may overlap on this front in the future!

JISC call for OER bids

CC Skills may interested in discussing the potential of joining forces

Posted in Dissemination, Funding, Meeting notes | Leave a comment

Using iPads in Art and Design

We would like to compile thoughts and ideas of how we can come together and explore the use and integration of iPads at UAL. We hope to collaborate and research in the broad area of ‘Networked Learning Technologies in Art and Design’ and examine the use of iPads in Art and Design.

Here are some posts about iPad use at UAL specifically to get us started:

Forum for Drawing, Touch Screen and Question Time- http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/forum-drawing-touch-screen-and-question-time – I participated in this workshop by Derrick Welsh, it may be good to contact Derrick ?

My digital revolution (some early questions to explore here ) – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/06/19/my-digital-revolution/

Posted in Communities of Practice, Development and Learning training, Equipment, Technology trends | 2 Comments

IT UAL and DIAL collaborations

Following my meeting with the Strategic Development SMT 22 May 12 Stephen Reid, Deputy Rector put me in contact with John Brown UALs director of IT. We had a very productive and long conversation about the digital at UAL. John then introduced me to Justin Banbury‎ and Steve Howells‎ who are key IT contacts and potential DIAL collaborators to work with in the areas of digital capacity and demand, they are also involved in a UAL wide digital capacity project called ‘digital life’. John, Justin and Steve were all very interested in the UAL digital baseline project and I’ve invited them to join and contribute to this UAL wide network.

As IT are looking for evidence/understanding of current and future demands regarding digital capacity in order to design UAL digital IT future we thought this could be a good opportunity for DIAL to support this process. Therefore in DIAL projects we will include some generic key data sets/evaluations:

IT infrastructure and storage – What are the needs of the UAL digital stakeholders

Service demand – What do courses, students colleges need, what are they considering in the future and need support with developing ?

Requirements – stream media, cloud services, web hosting, video server, course showcase websites, server space, project websites.

Past experience – Evidence and stories of where we’ve been and are currently at.

Future gazing – What do we want to see or are emerging trends (edu-social, open educational practice and open educational resources etc)

All the above categories can be found in the UAL digital baseline project and its open for anyone at UAL to contribute.

Posted in Activity & progress, Baseline report, Baselining, Communities of Practice, Senior Management and Strategy, University Strategy | Tagged | 5 Comments

My digital revolution

So it arrives, my new bit of kit. A bit of a school yard status symbol, I feel like the last kid at Academic Standards & Development Committee to get an iPad.  Will I make enough use of it to justify the iPad sized hole it made in our budget? Or will it gather dust like a juicer in the kitchen, a reminder of how unrealistic our self-image and aspirations are. The big potential use for me would be committee meetings. I have probably about three inches of papers to read a week, all of which have to be printed off and collated. I lug them around to read on my daily train journeys, cart them into meetings and then stash in a pile till I recycle them a year later. Colleagues at meetings whizz between papers on laptops & iPads, and Nancy appears to have been physically welded to her iPad like a bionic extra limb; she says she’s stopped using paper altogether.  But I have tried and failed to read on screen, and I feel secure with a large pile of paper: I use the size of the stack to estimate the workload (I had to assess an electronic portfolio a few months ago and was right up against the deadline because I couldn’t judge its scale accurately, and therefore didn’t set aside enough time).  I can fish out a particular paper to reuse in other conversations, and most of all, I believe I need a pen in my hand to think. Annotating my papers with scribbles is how I engage with the content.

 

The iPad sits there, shiny, inanimate, a reminder of my hubris, thinking I can change my life via technology. I don’t feel any particular bond with it.  I can use it to open papers sent as email attachments but can’t see anywhere to save them.

 

I ask Nancy what annotation tools she uses and she gives me a list. I can’t download anything.  It turns out I already have an iTunes account so my daughter can download ‘design a princess wardrobe’ and ‘cut the rope’ apps to my work iPhone when I’m cooking tea. She has the password.  The PAs and committee clerks are circling. They have a great investment in this working out. Who likes photocopying committee minutes for other people?

 

So what’s my iTunes password? This could be a deal breaker.  Amazingly my 9 year old remembers it and it works. I find the Annotation Apps; iTunes finds my credit card. I seem to have previously bought a lot of 69p apps of princess and Barbie games.  I leave the annotation apps downloading and put a wash on, put socks away, read stories, wash up, and go to bed.

 

At 2am I come downstairs. Vivien woke 3 times with a tummy bug and I’ve changed three nappies since going to bed a few hours before. Then Rob our 4 year old came into our bed, and then the cat got onto the bed and asked for its breakfast. So I give up trying to sleep and come down for a cup of tea. Have my apps loaded up? Yes they have. I spend 2 hours downloading papers & setting up folders. It’s AMAZING! Look at my folders – so neat, so efficient. Look, I can highlight PDFs and write myself notes on them!  I look for more papers to download, read and annotate, because it’s so much fun.  I think it’s going to be OK. I think the iPad & I have bonded.

 

Sent from my iPad

 

Posted in Baselining, Communities of Practice, Equipment, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

UCU wary of lecture capture

Interesting perspectives on UCU being wary of lecture capture by stephen downes OLdaily. In some way UAL are way ahead of all this, in other ways we’re not, but I think we’re already thinking about the pros and cons and there’s some interesting research under way at UAL that explores this area.

“The University and College Union (UCU), which represents many academics in HE, passed a motion (HE43) at their recent HE sector conference that expresses some of the anxieties that surround lecture capture. These include questions about the pedagogical value of recorded lectures and a fear that the technology will support the marketisation of education by enabling lectures to be franchised or sold.” ( http://telic.wordpress.com/2012/06/11/ucu-wary-of-lecture-capture/ )

The resolutions are actually quite useful, and I hope that the UCU co-opts people with real expertise and understanding to help carry them through. The resolutions are: Continue reading

Posted in National debate, Open education (group) | 2 Comments

Digital technologies for learning and teaching

From the Rectors page http://blogs.arts.ac.uk/rector/2012/06/12/digital-technologies-for-learning-and-teaching/

One of UAL’s areas of strength is the fantastic uses students and staff are making of digital technologies to support learning and teaching and professional practice. You can see some of our best examples can be viewed on the Process Arts website, at http://process.arts.ac.uk and http://myblog.arts.ac.uk.

Digital technology can enable us to capture, preserve, share, collaborate, and publish our activities. It can simplify, speed up and streamline processes, and in a wide variety of ways, we can expect it to shape many of our social and professional activities in years to come.

UAL’s Digital Integration into Arts Learning (DIAL) project, partially funded by JISC, aims to improve graduate employability and develop confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students. See more on the project blog at http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk.

As part of the project, ‘digital baseline’ blogs will record all aspects of digital life, including learning and teaching, College, department, course and individual perspectives. It is a chance for us all to contribute, view and map how we at UAL are integrating the ‘digital’ into any aspects of our day-to day practice. The seven digital baseline blogs (six College blogs and one institutional one) will give us an up-to-date snapshot of how we are integrating and supporting the digital in our practice.

The digital baseline blogs will be an ongoing agile project relying on UAL staff and student contributions until November 2013; the blogs are open for all UAL staff and students to contribute. Please add your College, course or personal stories and perspectives of best practice or gaps you have identified in UAL’s current digital provision.

UAL baseline
CCA baseline
CCAD baseline
CSM baseline
LCC baseline
LCF baseline
WCA baseline

Please share any comments or questions here or contact Chris Follows (c.follows@arts.ac.uk),  DIAL project manager.

Posted in #UALbestpractice, #UALgaps, Baseline report, Baselining, DIAL updates, Senior Management and Strategy | Tagged | Leave a comment

Should students be given the power to decide how universities are run?

Institutions want feedback from undergraduates about their courses, but sharing big decisions about running the university is more controversial – http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2012/jun/11/universities-giving-students-more-power?newsfeed=true

Also see: Digital technologies for learning and teaching – http://blogs.arts.ac.uk/rector/2012/06/12/digital-technologies-for-learning-and-teaching/

Posted in National debate | 1 Comment

Webinar: Emerging Themes on Developing Digital Literacies

By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society.

Webinar: Emerging Themes on Developing Digital Literacies

Webinar presented by Paul Bailey who is a Programme Manager in the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC). Paul will be joined by Andrew Comrie who acts as a critical friend for a number of JISC funded digital literacy projects. See slides here – http://www.slideshare.net/jisc-elearning/digital-litertacies-rscscotlandi3

Continue reading

Posted in JISC events | Leave a comment

DIAL project update: Strategic Development SMT 22 May 12

DIAL project update: Project manager Chris Follows Strategic Development SMT 22 May 12

DIAL presentation to the Strategic Development SMT.

Project

The DIAL project (Digital Integration into Arts Learning)

Programme

Funding

Dates

Two year JISC funded digital literacies (DL) programme100k plus matched funding (duration: <24> months)Project start date: Nov 2011, (Programme July 11 – 4 months behind schedule) Project completion date:) Nov 2013 (Completion) July 2013 (final report due)

Websites

DIAL blog http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/process.arts http://process.arts.ac.uk/

Project Plan

http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/project-plan/
 
Milestones: M1 setup (project, team and groups) M2 (Group content spaces on process.arts) M3 (Group as projects/plans) M4 (Engage with industry/sector partner) M5 (long term integration with UAL webspace/environment) M6 (Year 1 Evaluation Report) M7 (Sustainability)

DIAL Objectives http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/02/10/objectives/

Objectives: Institutional (Selected for discussion for this meeting)

  • Embed DIAL networks and digital literacies developments into UAL web environment, policies and practices.
  • Define, debate and test impact of new institutional terms, definitions and policies including: flexible learning, digital citizenship, digital literacy/capability and open education.
Objectives: Staff
  • Improved flexible approaches to CPD & PPD staff development
  • Support the implementation of digitally enhanced learning & practice
Objectives Students:
  • Improved graduate employability by enhancing presentation skills and professional online identities.

 

What makes UAL a forward thinking university in terms of its digital capacity?

  • Methods
  • Policy and strategy
  • Infrastructure
  • Support and professional services
  • Practices
  • Developing capability
  • Cultures and attitudes

Key lessons learned DIAL programme related: (Specific to this meeting)

  • DIAL project or programme? (The DIAL project was always going to be bigger than a project and by acknowledging this and looking at DIAL as a potential UAL programme we can better build a case for developing a UAL wide digital strategy and sustainability plans to develop and maintain progressive digital practice at UAL. So DIAL will run as a programme and do its best to acknowledge as wide a spectrum of issues as possible although it cannot address everything.
  • Ongoing and official baseline report being implemented by UAL across key departments (with DIAL board support)
  • Integration and alignment of UAL fellowships in DIAL related projects
  • New mode of delivery for the PGCert course & courses – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/04/29/e-learning-strategy-group-meeting-elsg-011211/
  • New platform to address Open and Flexible Learning practice at UAL, long term evaluation and reflection on progress (Nov 2013) – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/open-and-flexible-learning
  • Following inclusion of IT (Philip Gourlay) on the DIAL project board and hearing our objectives the DIAL IT representative would like to address and establish a more open presence in UAL to help communicate better their activities, they would also like to pilot improved online resources and more participatory online environments for IT support.

DIAL objectives

DIAL Interim Report – Activities & Progress
1 Baseline report. Identify gaps and best practice in the integration of digitally enhanced learning at UAL Following the JISC baseline, the DIAL project board has agreed to support the development of an official institutional baseline report for its digital provision across all colleges and departments. This will begin with each college developing an open blog to cluster baseline specific information about their college, an Institutional blog will also be developed.
2 Surveys http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/category/survey/ We’re currently running an online DIAL survey. The survey was circulated after the JISC baseline submission given our late project start. The survey was promoted to staff only and has received over 150+ responses. The responses are very detailed and have produced valuable data – http://tinyurl.com/dial-survey
3 Embed DIAL networks and digital literacies developments into UAL web environment, policies and practices DIAL Project Blogand identityE-Learning StrategyGroup meetingsSTAFF & CAREER DEVELOPMENT FORUM See detailsDIAL project board formed including deputy Rector, Dean and key staff – meeting agenda 12/03/12

  • IT & IS would like to address and establish a more open presence in UAL to help communicate more about what there activities, they would also like to pilot improved online resources and more participatory online environments.
  • DIAL project board has agreed to support the development of an official institutional baseline report
4 Develop and encourage more flexible learning opportunities and experiences for staff STAFF & CAREER DEVELOPMENT FORUM See detailsAs part of the DIAL Open educational at UALgroupContent community – Open and Flexible Learning at UAL
6 Increase the involvement of grassroots staff in leading university-wide DL development projects See - http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/Specifically: Two successful 2012 Teaching & Professional Fellowship Awards, both projects are aligned closely with DIAL’s objectives and we look forward to working together – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/04/12/teaching-professional-fellowship-awards-2012/UAL Community of Practice (CoP) awards ( Communities of Practice funding to build networks ) – The Learning Studio – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/learning-studio and Drupal UAL – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/drupal-ual
7 Define, debate and test impact of new institutional terms, definitions and policies including: flexible learning, digital citizenship and open education. Evidence in project groups - http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/Focus & discussion group meetings – See hereFlexible Learning at UAL- initial thoughtsDIAL Meeting and presentation planed with Strategic Development SMT and Deputy RectorDIAL Will be presenting and participating in a session around digitally enhanced learning on the 29th June at the Forum for Programme Directors and Course Leaders.
8 Introduce and explore notions of flexible learning, open education practice into staff CPD/PPD Flexible Learning at UAL – initial thoughts Open education group – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/category/open-education/
9 DIAL to encourage, support and collaborate with ‘staff led’ fellowships, secondments and projects’ to mutual benefit of the staff involved and the common good. DIAL were involved in the planning and selection process of the UAL Teaching & Professional Fellowship Awards 2012 – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/04/12/teaching-professional-fellowship-awards-2012/
10 Explore and debate relationships between digitally enhanced learning and perceived barriers to progressive practice including online identity, time and skills. Developing your online professional identities – A cross project collaboration between project groups: How we use technology as participatory tool in teaching and promoting the creative student: http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/developing-your-online-professional-identities

  • When and how should student’s set up their Professional Identity?
  • What are the skill sets that employers are looking for from our students?
  • What role is Web 2 technology playing in supporting them/this?
  • How do lecturers who are also artist promote their own practice? (I just thought of this)

This survey has been created in Google Docs. We identified a problem across colleges of departments and courses wanting to evaluate skill level and digital use. Replication and repetition were a problem, several courses and departments are using this data and using the Survey tag field at the bottom so we can filter their data for local analysis.

11 Carry out interventions and case studies that enquire and inform change and development in individual practice and student engagement and that have potential to initiate course level curriculum change. In progress – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/
12 Integrate DIAL initiatives and resources with the new Student Enterprise & Employability Service (SEE), bringing together the work of Creative Careers, the Enterprise Centre for the Creative Arts (ECCA), Artquest, Own-it and ArtsTemps. Enterprise and employability in the curriculum – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/enterprise-and-employability-curriculumSix students in Six colleges. The DIAL project is piloting different feedback methods (successful student led survey) – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/01/24/dial-researcher-field-worker-pilot/
13 representation online skills to create and present professional self; including online presentation skills, personal website development and online professional identities. Developing your online professional identities – A cross project collaboration between project groups: How we use technology as participatory tool in teaching and promoting the creative student: http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/developing-your-online-professional-identities

  1. When and how should student’s set up their Professional Identity?
  2. What are the skill sets that employers are looking for from our students?
  3. What role is Web 2 technology playing in supporting them/this?
  4. How do lecturers who are also artist promote their own practice?

Feedback notes from Enterprise week session: ‘Sharing knowledge improve and develop professional identities’

This survey has been created in Google Docs. We identified a problem across colleges of departments and courses wanting to evaluate skill level and digital use. Replication and repetition were a problem, several courses and departments are using this data and using the Survey tag field at the bottom so we can filter their data for local analysis.

14 Explore UAL networked online communities within the university and the potential for national and international collaboration from courses, colleges, disciplines, industry and wider sectors. Introduction of interest groups and open login to allow UAL and outside UAL participation and online collaboration – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/what-are-project-groups
15 Enhance student understanding of digitally enhanced learning within the context of flexible learning. In progress – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/
16 Develop confidence and capability to practice more flexible learning approaches In progress – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/
17 Improve perspectives, engagement and understanding of online learning resources. In progress – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/dial-groups/

 

Posted in DIAL updates, Dissemination, Senior Management and Strategy | Tagged | 1 Comment

Defining UAL’s strengths

I’ve been thinking  about UAL’s strengths as a provider of Arts Higher and Further education, and apart from the obvious (our size, the range of specialisms in one university, being in London, and the amazing students and staff we attract from all over the globe because of those factors), I came up with three things: industry links, collaboration, and digital developments.

I’ve been thinking a lot about those three factors, since student enterprise and employability came into my portfolio of responsibilities, since successfully bidding for the DIAL project and obviously working closely for the last six years with UAL’s elearning team, and since undertaking a survey of practices relating to assessing team work.

I’d say UAL has a claim to be emerging as a sector leader in all three fields – we did pretty well in the Times Higher student experience survey in April 2012 for ‘good industry connections’, 11th after the likes of Imperial, Oxford and Surrey.  Our students say they really value being taught by practitioners, and placements and industry sponsored projects and awards are prominent in our provision.  We have many courses which are structured around collaborative working: I’m chairing the final stage of the validation of the MA in Collaborative Performance tomorrow, which focuses on collaboration as a key way of working, and we have excellent examples of group assessment all over the university.  Finally, our focus on the visual component in our learning technologies makes us distinctive, and of interest in a context where text has often prevailed to the detriment of all learning, not just that relating to visual disciplines.  Our work on Open Educational Practice is also starting to be recognised as sector leading and of international interest.

Continuing to explore and develop these three areas will be good for UAL students who will benefit from excellent practice and leading edge developments, and exciting for the staff involved, as well as good for their careers in the long term.  The three combined arguably give UAL a distinctive profile which cannot easily be replicated – and help us answer the question, ‘are we famous for something other than being the largest provider of art and design education’ with conviction and a sense of eagerness and hope for what the future brings.

Posted in Baselining, Communities of Practice, DIAL updates, National debate, Open education (group), Profile & identity, Senior Management and Strategy, Uncategorized, University Strategy | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

DIAL project 2-minute video update

A video overview of the DIAL (Digital Integration into Arts Learning) project part of the JISC Developing Digital Literacies programme – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/

The video can be downloaded via process.arts – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/dial-project-2-minute-video-update

The DIAL project (Digital Integration into Arts Learning) a two year JISC funded digital literacies (DL) project at University of the arts London (UAL). The DIAL project aims to address improved graduate employability and cultural change by developing confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students.

The DIAL project will encourage ‘open’ communities of practice and explore key issues surrounding the development of digitally enhanced learning.

Posted in DIAL updates, Dissemination | Leave a comment

DIAL are hiring! myblog.arts blogger/researchers and/or drupal users

The DIAL project are looking for students or staff who are confident myblog.arts bloggers and/or drupal users for minimum of 6 days each, to be employed via ArtsTemps (from May to Sept, some weekdays, evenings, weekends and work from home optional, occasional college visits may be necessary).

Interested? Please contact ArtsTemps ( http://www.ualartstemps.co.uk/ArtsLondon/index.asp ) or Chris Follows at c.follows@arts.ac.uk please provide a short introduction and say why you would be interested in working on the projects below also please include links to online activity you are currently involved in.

If you have any extra skills in the digital domain and would like to be considered for future DIAL projects then please also include these too.

Myblog.arts blogger/researchers

DIAL recently compiled a basic baseline report ( http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/dial-ual-baseline-report ); the report was a quick snapshot overview of where we are as a university in addressing our digital capacity. We are now looking to create a more in-depth baseline report for each college and would like this to be a true, open and fully inclusive overview of our current situation. We would like to explore how we at UAL are integrating with the ‘digital’ in all aspects of our college lives, addressing our anxieties, fears as well as exposing our problems and celebrating our achievements.

We are looking for blogger researchers to work across colleges and help create a dynamic blogs, spark debate, compile, publish and manage baseline information, we aim to run 6 digital baseline college blogs, one for each college, you will be responsible for running multiple blogs.

Drupal/web developers (any level) to help champion and support the development of UALs new in-house drupal community and support our hack days

Drupal UAL a new open source web development community of practice at UAL

This project aims to encourage and develop a new open support network for UAL staff and students to explore, experiment and share ideas and knowledge of using and developing Drupal web environments and projects.

We are looking for drupal/web developers (any level) to help champion and support the development of UALs in house drupal community and support our hack days. Join in and read more here: http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/drupal-ual

Interested: We will be offering occasional work days to support this project, if interested please join the drupal UAL community and add yourself to the contacts list on the process.arts group, let us know your interested in helping out !

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Web Literacy Skills

Thought this work by Mozilla is very inline with the DIAL objectives.

http://erinknight.com/ ………prepare people for participation and contribution in today’s (and tomorrow’s) digital society and global economy. Webmaking skills can set up an approach to life in general that fosters not only looking-under-the-hood, embracing failure, tinkering and remixing, but also participation, citizenship and action. These are not just life skills but ultimately a way of approaching life.

For more please see What is webmaking? – http://erinknight.com/post/17966967241/what-is-webmaking

The Mozilla Learning team are defining a set of core web literacy skills and developing learning pathways for people to develop and hone these skills. Our goals are to develop and empower more webmakers by providing them with the opportunity to learn making by making. This work is leveraging all of the great momentum, tools and content built through Hackasaurus. -https://wiki.mozilla.org/Learning

Summer Campaign 2012 – https://wiki.mozilla.org/Summer_Campaign_2012

We’re building a generation of webmakers. First step: invite people everywhere to MEET up to MAKE something cool and LEARN how the code behind the web works. It’s called the Summer Code Party and it starts June 23rd.

Mozilla and dozens of others orgs are getting together to make this happen. Here’s how you join in:

1. MEET with friends or go to an event.
2. MAKE something cool on the web.
3. LEARN how the web gets made.

Wiki – https://teachwebmaking.mozillalabs.com/index.php/Main_Page#Who_is_this_website_for.3F

Posted in Digital PAT, JISC events, Support tools, Technology trends | 1 Comment

Online Reflective Practice group: Update

As the two core PG Cert units draw to a close, it’s an ideal time to look back at the online reflection that colleagues have participated in as part of the course. I’ll report on the outcomes first and then the process:

Outcomes

All those completing the first unit engaged to a satisfactory extent with the online reflective tasks, with the vast majority engaging at a high level. The tasks, with links to examples of posts and comments, are detailed here. Participation in the reflective tasks was measured through self and peer assessment and the spread of grades awarded was interesting; ‘B’ was by far the most commonly awarded grade. There were also several ‘A’s and a few ‘D’s. Hardly any ‘C’s were awarded. This supports my observation that once people began to engage in the tasks, they saw the benefits fairly swiftly and their engagement continued and deepened. The few who obtained ‘D’ grades generally did not engage until it was too late (I’ll post up a couple of graphic representations once I’ve got feedback out to the participants).

The quality of the posts exceeded my expectations. The quality of the comments was also very good, but in many cases these conversations did not take place when they were supposed to. While some groups maintained conversations throughout around the monthly topics, in many cases interactions were sparse until the few days preceding the terminal assessment, when they rose significantly. Some of these comments referred to posts made three or four months previously.

The self and peer assessment of participation demonstrated colleagues’ capacity for honest and constructive assessment of their own and their peers’ engagement in the tasks. It also revealed their understanding of the benefits of online reflection and the attitudes and approaches required to maximise these. The following is an example of anonymous peer feedback exchanged:

I believe that [x] is committed to the subject and is highly reflective, however there were some planning issues which meant I got to read some of the posts quite late. Some of the posts I do feel would have benefited from being a little more concise which would have helped with the articulation of some points. [x] shows a high level of self-direction in his/her blog posts and demonstrates a desire to improve his/her teaching practice throughout.

In terms of the impact online reflective practice has had on learning, I am certain of three things. First, the standard of the terminal assignments submitted for the first unit (i.e. after six months on the course and five day-long workshops), was significantly higher than those submitted by previous cohorts after 12 months on the course and 20 half-day workshops. Essentially, this cohort have achieved more in half the time. Second, in conversation with participants halfway through the unit, many told me that, were it not for the online tasks, they probably would not have read or written anything yet. And third, a small but significant proportion of those who have completed both units are continuing to use their blogs.

Feedback gathered from participants about the online reflective tasks revealed that the vast majority felt they should be retained as a fundamental part of the course. Some participants even felt that we should increase the weighting the tasks have on the unit grade (currently 10%), as such low stakes are disproportionate to the amount of work they put in to completing the tasks. A minority (albeit a significant one) stated a preference for using a less public forum for the tasks, or at least a system with simpler privacy settings.

Process

Although engagement in online reflective practice was high among those who completed the unit, and appeared to enhance learning, participant drop-out/deferral rates were also significant. Minor factors contributing to this include improved flexibility of the programme, which makes it easier for participants to defer one or two units until the following year, and higher than normal redundancies. One major factor was the overlapping scheduling of the first two units, which increased the workload and the complexity of the programme; this has been resolved for 2012/13. Unfortunately it is very difficult to untangle this factor from the increased complexity and greater challenge inherent in the new curriculum. The other major factor was the continuous nature of the online reflective tasks. For the first time, participants were being required to produce something from the outset that would influence their grade for the course. This meant that those who were not engaging as they should were made aware of this – often through informal peer feedback – and forced to be pro-active in arranging deferral rather than waiting until the end of the course to submit a borderline assignment (or not).

Lessons learned about literacies for online reflective practice

Introducing online reflection as a compulsory element of a course has led to the development of the following elements of participants’ digital literacy:

Understanding the benefits and challenges of online reflective practice – as evidenced in terminal reflective assignments and ongoing exchange of feedback with participants.
Understanding the attitudes and approaches required to maximise the benefits of online reflective practice – as evidenced in the self and peer assessments.
Willingness to try new tools and processes – as evidenced on the blogs. Seeing group members posting images and videos often prompted participants to try this for themselves and/or ask each other for advice and support.
Willingness to find the answers oneself – whereas at the start of the course I would receive requests for assistance before a participant had even tried to find any information, by the end the requests I received were much more specific; participants had tried a number of avenues and had come to me as a last resort.
Greater tolerance of complexity – several participants who felt in the early stages that the course requirements were overwhelmingly complex seemed much more comfortable about the requirements in the latter stages. Four months in, we found we had to ask everyone to start logging in with their new student IDs to access their feedback, whereas we had assured them previously that they would be able to use their existing staff IDs. The response to this was nowhere near as negative as we expected – people seemed to just get on with it.
Tool-specific knowledge – e.g. how to add and edit blog posts and comments, how to create blog groups and subscribe to new posts, how to upload media and create hyperlinks.

Next steps

The next phase will be to look more deeply at the data from the tasks, the assessments, and from forthcoming surveys and interviews, to get a better understanding of the role of compulsory, course-based online reflective activities in developing particular aspects of participants’ digital literacy. It will be important to contact colleagues who deferred their studies to gain a better understanding of the factors that influenced their decision. I’m not anticipating that this information will be of much use (previous studies have shown that withdrawing students often cite external pressures and are unlikely to connect their attrition with course design, student support, etc..), but it’s worth a shot. One strategy may be to ask them to speculate what they would have found most challenging had the external pressures (work, family etc.) not been as significant. My major concern is that the online reflective activities were actually a little too challenging, and that this contributed to participant withdrawal and delayed engagement. If this is the case, I need to identify how best to address this; through greater applicant awareness, longer participant induction, different support structures, etc..

I am also interested in looking at the other end of the spectrum; those participants who are now continuing to engage in online reflective practice through their blogs now the units have ended. What are their motivations for doing this and how did these come about? Was it a particular aspect of the course that helped them over a particular threshold, and is this something that can be developed, or given more emphasis, for future cohorts? Was it a particular experience they had, and can this be replicated for others?

 

Posted in Activity & progress, DIAL pilot Groups, DIAL updates, Online Reflective Practice (group) | 4 Comments

My Digital Life – Call for Submissions

UAL students are invited to submit proposals to give a presentation about their digital lives at the 2012 Designs on e-Learning conference hosted by UAL and Penn State University. This is an international conference dedicated to innovations in learning technologies in art and design.

Application deadline: 5.00pm Friday 18th May

We are looking for highly visual and creative six minute presentations that tell us about the unique ways you use the digital in your everyday life: to create, collaborate, research, learn and of course, socialise and have fun.

Successful applicants will have free access to the 3-day conference and be invited to the conference dinner at Shoreditch House. For more information on the brief and how to apply use the QR code below or go to http://myblog.arts.ac.uk/del2012/my-digital-life/

Posted in Profile & identity, Technology trends | Tagged | Leave a comment

UAL experts in the media

This looks interesting in terms of online identity and professional profile, I wonder what constitutes media in this context, as media/publishing is increasingly in hands of anyone ? Its encouraging to see UAL provide an online platform for promoting the profiles of its staff and students, what do you think?

Search for an expert - media-experts.arts.ac.uk

Text below taken from this webpage - http://newsevents.arts.ac.uk/28865/ual-experts-in-the-media/ 

The 24 hour media is hungry for expert comment to bring their reporting to life, and working with the media to provide that comment is one of the key ways in which academics and universities raise the profile of what they do.

A recent example of a UAL academic doing just that is LCC’s Jo Hodges talking to the BBC about branding in the Mayoral election. Jo’s snappy and authoritative comments hugely improve the quality of the report and, crucially, also reinforce LCC’s reputation as a place where leaders in their field are working and teaching; a reputation that is vital to attracting students, industry partnerships and funding.

To capitalise on the benefits that working with the media bring, the University has launched a new searchable Guide to Experts to help journalists find expert comment throughout our Colleges, online at media-experts.arts.ac.uk.

The Guide is updated continually and we are always looking for new experts, so if you are interested in speaking to the media about your area of expertise, please fill in the form at: media-experts.arts.ac.uk/join

You will not be called directly by the media and your contact details will never be given out without your permission, so you will always be able to decline a request to speak to the media if you are too busy or unsure that you want to talk about a particular topic.

If you want further information about the Guide or any other aspect of working with the media, pleasecontact the Press Office.

Posted in National debate, Profile & identity | Tagged | 1 Comment

Introduction project management, DIAL & open education at UAL a case study

I recently attended a very productive 2 day introduction to project management course at UAL by Emma Altman, was very timely for me given DIAL is my first officially managed project. It was a great opportunity to road test the DIAL project plan and discuss projects with a focused group of like minded individuals. There were two significant outcomes I’d taken from these two days:

1) DIAL project or programme? (The DIAL project was always going to be bigger than a project and by acknowledging this and looking at DIAL as a potential UAL programme we can better build a case for developing a UAL wide digital strategy and sustainability plans to develop and maintain progressive digital practice at UAL. So DIAL will run as a programme and do its best to acknowledge as wide a spectrum of issues as possible although it can not address everything. DIAL will concentrate on supporting a small number of DIAL project groups, these focused mostly ‘grassroots’ projects  will address issues identified in the DIAL project plan, ‘Open education at UAL’ is one of DIAL’s first pilot groups)

2) Using the DIAL project ‘open education at UAL’ as a group case study example.

On day 2 we were asked if we’d like to work on some generic case studies or if we had any in-house examples, I suggested we use the DIAL/ALTO ‘open education at UAL’ project as case study examples, the group responded well to this challenge and got to work. As a starting point the groups looked at the existing notes and evaluation summary we had prepared previously (see here).

After much debate the two groups concluded:

Aims:

  • Let people know what to do and how to do OER at UAL
  • Open at UAL baseline – what is it like now. unconnected, no overall strategy, variable resources and responsibilities, specialist.
  • What it will be like, strategy and sustainable model, clear direction for UAL , Institutional shift ‘cultural change’

Outputs:

  • Produce a handbook – ‘Getting started/how to do Open Education at UAL’ including: Teaching resources, Individual and institutional recommendations for the future and a open education sustainability plan for UAL.

Objectives: Specific

  • Debate: Issues, reservations & potentials
  • Investigate: Expertise, delivery, are of focus, (ie digital non digital)

Objectives: Measurable

  • Contribution of people – who? & Why?
  • Student perception and the balance of self directed learning verses ‘taught’ (Technology in HE teaching: blended learning and beyond)

Approach

  •  Data analysis – small drop-ins, debates and focus groups across all colleges
  • Include/encourage those non-self selecting open enthusiasts
  • Record debate outcomes – blog posts and compare – participants to contribute
  • Time spent on this should be quick, project should be a scoping exercise
  • Investigation into open educational resources – looking into who would be the contributors and who would be the users (be good to see how people see themselves in this space)

Quality assurance

  • Understanding restrictions balance with UALs academic standards and assessment criteria

And the end of the session Emma released some OER of her own:

Change Notice template d0.1

DISC quick guide

Work Package Brief template d0.1

 

Posted in Dissemination, Evaluation, Open education (group) | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Updated notes Open Educational project

Here’s a quick update on the Open Education at UAL project we are running as part of DIAL/ALTO . Team ALTO/DIAL have been out in the field meeting with UAL staff at various sites across UAL – we have completed sessions at CSM, LCF and at CCAD and had various other feedback/discussions which has informed the project to date: http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/tag/open-education-debate/

Our key aims are to engage with people who are interested in producing OER, a self-selected group. Our aim is to expand the boundaries of that community by:

  1. Generating debate about the OER that addresses peoples’ fears, (mis)conceptions, and aspirations for what it might achieve
  2. Reviewing the factors that have underpinned achievements in ALTO/process.arts and formulating some strategies accordingly.

Our original Approach was:

Part 1 of the plan is to set up a live debate, preceded by an online debate on OER.  Two prominent speakers will be invited.  The first debate will focus on OER in Fine Art.

Part 2 is to start reviewing ALTO/process.arts, we will work compile demographic information about the authors who have contributed thus far.  E.g. which colleges they come from, the number of items contributed, discipline areas, staff group, types of resource.

How might we evaluate this?

Part 1 – reflective interviews with debate participants

Part 2 – The data itself is evaluative.  We might also ask – to what extent is the information collected sufficient to tell us something about who is interested in engaging with OED.  Do we also need to do some interviews with a sample of contributors?

What’s changed ?

We had planned to hold a big ‘Open Education at UAL’ event at UAL during global education week but felt this was too much too soon and should go back to basics and instead carry out small ‘on the ground’ focus groups, disscusions and debates.

Given the postponement of the big debate and that we set up more local focus groups our project evaluator Duna advised us (28 February 2012) to re-think our approach to the project evaluation.  What data do we want to collect and pass on to Duna to evaluate?

Here are some options:

1. Pick 3 people from each meeting who you think represent different constituencies (more engaged/not engaged or have different roles managing/tutoring) and ask them to respond to a couple of questions by email.  The questions could include: Before coming what did you think was the purpose of the meeting for you? In what ways, if any, did it fulfil that purpose?  What insights did you gain from coming?

2. Record how many people come, their jobs, their disciplines.  Consider to what extent this profile is representative of the college as a whole.  Who is missing?  Identify people who represent those groups and ask them whether they heard about the meeting, and what prevented them from coming.  (This needs to be done carefully – without coming across as blaming staff for not coming.  So emphasise it’s about evaluating your approach and its relevance to all staff.)

3. Write up your own reflections on the focus groups independently, compare them with each other, not deleting any differences.  Produce a version that is joint but that might contain some question where you disagree.  Then send this version to one or two participants in the focus groups and ask them to comment.

4. Get all participants to write one sentence about OE at their college the start of the focus groups and keep it to themselves.  Ask them to comment on that sentence, in writing at the end.  They then take that piece of paper away with them and send you their comments after a period of reflection.  You could engage in this process yourselves as well – checking your assumptions about each of the colleges.

With this in mind and the feedback we’ve had to date we have revised  our evaluation plan: See revised  our evaluation plan (comming soon)

 


Posted in Dissemination, Evaluation, Open education (group) | Tagged | 1 Comment

What is LCF-Ology?

It’s a new approach to staff development that provides a mix of informal and formal learning opportunities, with an opportunity to eat good food and network.

It provides a safe space away from the demands of work, a space to learn about some of the digital and technical possibilities at LCF, a space to ask the questions that you sometimes don’t get the opportunity to ask. It also provides the chance to provide feedback – and hopefully put aside the ‘infrastructure issues’ (for a moment) and focus on practice and possibilities.

Dial at the LCF-Ology – get involved!

Room 418a – Chris Follows – 11:00 – 15:00

The DIAL project (Digital Integration into Arts Learning) is a two year JISC funded digital literacies (DL) project at UAL. The DIAL project aims to improve graduate employability and bring about cultural change by developing confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students.

DIAL will encourage, support and collaborate with ‘staff led’ fellowships, secondments and projects’ to mutual benefit of the staff involved and the common good.

Drop in and have an informal chat with our specialist

Come and get more information, give your views or find out how to get involved.

When is it?

Wednesday 21 March, 10:00 – 16:30

That’s too short notice, I’m busy!

Yes, it may seem like short notice but sometimes that just cannot be avoided. You do not have to come to the whole day, if you have other commitments, just drop in when you can.

Who is it targeted at?

Everyone – all LCF Staff are invited. There are particular sessions that will be of more interest to particular staff roles, however, we hope you find something that interests you – even if it is just the extra special all day buffet and free mystery prizes.

How do I sign up?

Have a look at the attached programme, decide on what you want to attend, and just drop me an email to let me know what you are interested in. The programme also contains information on what sessions need booking and where you can just drop in.

Why should I attend?

Because the day has been created especially for you – and we need your input, your presence, your time.

Do ALs and VPs get paid to attend?

There will be a flat rate of two hours paid to all ALs and VPs who attend.

Wednesday 21 March 10:00 – 16:30 John Prince’s Street, Various Rooms

Workshops require booking and have limited spaces.

Open Access involves individual or group slots that are booked directly with the Specialist on the day. The Open Access session will only run for 1.5 hours, which may mean 15/20 minutes for each individual slot depending on the demand.

Drop-In Studio does not required booking, you can pop in and see any of our Drop-in Specialists, find out more about their subjects/areas of expertise, tailor the discussion to your individual needs – while you have something to eat and drink.


The LCF ALL Day Buffet is only available to staff who have booked a place/expressed an interest in attending….

Breakfast Buffet available from 10:30 – 12:00

 Lunch Buffet available from 12:00 – 14:00

 Tea Buffet available from 14:00 – 16:00

Posted in #UALbestpractice, Dissemination, Learning Studio, UAL Training | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Learning Studio Workshop on Digital and Social Media for Teaching and Learning

Where: Staff Club, CSM, Kings Cross When:  15:30 – 18:00 on Monday 19th March

  • Sian Evans:  Facebook to support communication, BA Jewellery Design
  • Cath Caldwell: Using Workflow in BA Graphic Design
  • John Jackson: How to set-up Workflow.
  • Hywel Davies: Cross-institutional collaboration on the ALTO project, BA Fashion Communication and Promotion
  • Jo Morrison: MyArts Blog and Skype to support student collaboration with MIT
  • Chris Follows: DIAL – The DIAL project aims to address improved graduate employability and cultural change by developing confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students.
  • Karen Fletcher and Nick Lloyd: An introduction to Lynda.com
  • Colin Buttimer: How new course pages integrate with existing digital communications, and online forms for interim customer relationship management.

 

 

Posted in Communities of Practice, Development and Learning training, Learning Studio | Tagged | Leave a comment

Open Education at the UAL discussion group meetings

As part of the work of two UAL CLTAD projects (DIAL and ALTO) we are holding a series of consultation meetings at Central St. Martins, Chelsea and Wimbledon around the themes of open education and digitally enhanced learning.

Focus and discussion group meetings – All Welcome
Meeting 1
Where: Central St. Martins, Kings Cross, A002 (reception meeting room)
Meeting 2
Where: Chelsea College, Room A208
Meeting 3
Where: Wimbledon College, 1st floor meetings room
When: 25th April 12:30 – 14:30
Dear Colleagues, You are warmly invited to a series of focus and discussion group meetings around the theme of encouraging and supporting UAL staff and students to participate in the growing worldwide open education movement.
These meetings will examine what is involved in sharing some of our learning resources openly on the web for others to use and how this may benefit staff, the UAL and students. If this is new to you, here is a link to a list of reasons to ‘Go Open’ – what do you think? http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/inside-out-benefits-sharing-our-learning-resources.
The meetings are part of the work of two UAL projects that are tasked with exploring and improving our ability to create and share open learning resources and to develop the skills and confidence in staff and students to work and collaborate in the digital world:
DIAL – Digital Integration into Arts Learning - http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/about-dial
ALTO – Arts Learning and Teaching Online - http://blogs.arts.ac.uk/alto/about
If you have any questions about the meeting or indeed about developing confidence and capability in the adoption and integration of digitally enhanced learning for staff and students at the UAL please contact the DIAL project manager
Chris Follows at c.follows@arts.ac.uk.
John Casey ALTO Project Manager
Cltad
University of the Arts London

 

Posted in Open education (group), Open source | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Demystify courses, make teaching more explicit

What does the University of the Arts London need to do to improve further?

Some of my notes following the recent FE provision OFSTED report recommendations, the below are choice sections that support DIAL’s ongoing baseline full report can be viewed here – http://newsevents.arts.ac.uk/files/2012/03/OFSTEDreport2012.pdf

On a few courses, students commented that the poor attendance of some students had a detrimental impact on the progress of the whole group. (Could more flexible and open participation through improved digitally enhanced learning support this?) e.g. Make courses more explicit through use of digital, documentation and communication.

In less than good sessions tutors do not always plan learning explicitly or check that all students are involved and are making good progress. Tutors’ written feedback following assessment does not always provide sufficiently clear and specific detail for students to reflect on after their assessment tutorial. (Could more flexible and open participation through improved digitally enhanced learning support this?) e.g. Make courses more explicit through use of digital, documentation and communication.

Demystify courses, how do we make teaching more explicit.

The teaching as mystery metaphor as Brookfield, S. (1995) suggests: “If good or bad teaching are all a matter of chance then there is no point trying to do better. The teaching as mystery metaphor also closes down the possibility of teachers sharing knowledge, insights, and informal theories of practice since mystery is, by definition, incommunicable.”  Brookfield, S. 1995. The Getting of Wisdom: What Critically Reflective Teaching is and Why It’s Important. [online] (Last modified on: 2005-05-01 12) http://nlu.nl.edu/academics/cas/ace/facultypapers/StephenBrookfield_Wisdom.cfm [Accessed 12 February 2012].

Increase the proportion of outstanding teaching by routinely and regularly monitoring teaching and learning, ensuring that observation records are more evaluative and that feedback to individuals clearly identifies strengths and areas for improvement. Share existing good practice in teaching and learning more widely.

Continue to improve the quality of provision by ensuring that self-assessment and action planning for improvement are consistently thorough and rigorous across all the colleges.

What students would like to see improved:

  • the booking system for technical workshops to alleviate the delay caused by high demand for some specialist workshop equipment in 3D, printmaking and textiles
  • the consistent application of attendance expectations and policy to minimise the adverse effect on group dynamics of poor attendance by some students
  • more workshops at Central Saint Martins
  • better communications about what and where guest speakers are available.

Key findings

CSM key finding highlights best practice
Studios and display spaces are well appointed. Print, 3D and digital workshops, as well as some specialist textile facilities, are well managed and heavily used. At times of high demand, access to some of these is sometimes restricted. Regular displays of recent work by students in communal spaces enable students to share ideas and provide insight into the work of other specialist practice. Foundation students have access to the exceptional library and collections housed in the college’s striking new building at nearby King’s Cross.

Emphasis on evaluating and communicating ideas often leads to innovative solutions and confident command of the creative process. Students’ excellent reflective journals clearly demonstrate how their work and thinking develops over time.

CCW  key finding highlights best practice
Resources and specialist facilities are very good. Students benefit from additional lectures and activities beyond their usual timetabled sessions. Students make good use of high-quality resources and materials on the virtual learning environment to support work in progress, or if they miss lectures or activities. Students benefit from excellent technical and workshop support available to them during, and beyond, timetabled sessions. Tutors and technical support staff are very well qualified.

The university has managed the restructuring of the foundation course skilfully and tutors value the open and supportive approach to change. Tutors have benefited from new opportunities to work in more diverse teams and share best practice. Students have benefited from the richer learning environment, increased contact with specialist staff and from greater access to resources.

Resources and specialist facilities are very good. Students benefit from additional lectures and activities beyond their usual timetabled sessions. Students make good use of high-quality resources and materials on the virtual learning environment to support work in progress, or if they miss lectures or activities. Students benefit from excellent technical and workshop support available to them during, and beyond, timetabled sessions. Tutors and technical support staff are very well qualified.

 

Posted in Baselining | Leave a comment

Cap and gown learning on a shoestring budget

With novel credentials being developed and employers seeing the value of low-cost study based on open courseware, Jon Marcus asks if the bricks-and-mortar elite will end up on the wrong side of history –

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&storycode=419088&c=2

Posted in National debate, Practice based accreditation tool, Technology trends | Tagged | Leave a comment

DIAL survey (short)

Please take a little time (less than 5 minutes) to tell us a little bit about how you use digital technology – and what you think about what you use. http://tinyurl.com/dial-survey

Posted in Survey | 2 Comments

Cloud and Crowd: Towards a collaborative future

Designs on E-Learning International Conference: 5th, 6th and 7th September 2012 University of the Arts, London

Cloud and Crowd: Towards a collaborative future

The eighth Designs on E-Learning international conference in the use of technology for teaching and learning in art, design and communication will be hosted by the Centre for Learning and Teaching (cltad) at University of the Arts, London on the 5th, 6th and 7th September 2012.

Following conferences hosted by Penn State University and then SCAD in Savannah, Georgia in the U.S, in 2011 the venue was Aalto University in Helsinki, Finland. For 2012 the conference is returning to London where the first was held in 2005. Attendees have been truly international, coming from the northernmost reaches of Scandinavia, to China, Korea, New Zealand and Australia, from the UK, several countries of Europe, and from North and South America.

As technologies continue to evolve, allowing students and lecturers greater flexibility, greater ease of use and unique possibilities for inclusion in the arts and design studio, the unique conference which is Designs on eLearning is an invaluable source of new and tested ideas and a forum for collaboration.

The format of the conference will be innovative, with barcamps, streamed sessions, discussions, performances and creative work. We are particularly interested in submissions by artists, museums and galleries and those involved in Art and Design practice in education. Joint lecturer/student submissions are also welcome.

Conference Themes for 2012:

  • Social Media
  • The Studio and Technology
  • Digital Literacy
  • User Generated Content
  • Collaboration and Community Building
  • Sustainability

Call for Papers

We are currently inviting the submission of abstracts for consideration by 20th April 2012.

Register your interest

To register your interest in the 2012 conference, please add your details to the Conference Mailing List.

If you wish any further information please get in touch with:

Robin Shaw
Conference Organiser
r.shaw@arts.ac.uk

or

Charlotte Webb
Administrator
c.webb@arts.ac.uk

Posted in Funding | Tagged | Leave a comment

Objectives

Lead and support wider collaborative ‘institutional’ objectives: (in collaboration with the new Digital Life programme and all involved projects)

  1. Debate and define UALs institutional understanding of terms associated with ‘Digital literacies’ within all aspects creative practice, including media literacies, information literacies, digital practice, digital citizenship, online identities, digital/social/cultural competencies, participatory culture, digital attributes, open practice, digital fluency etc. with an aim of publishing an ‘institutional’ evidence base of UAL glossary of terms based on an iterative process of practical, subject and interest specific case study evidence.
  2. Address staff key competencies required for integrating ‘digitally enhanced practice’ into everyday practice and to support CPD & PPD. See JISC programme material.
  3. Identify gaps and best practice in the integration of digitally enhanced learning at UAL, Address key areas and themes identified in the DIAL baseline report.

DIAL will continue with the following KEY objectives with an aim of informing the new Digital Life programme from the following ‘Digital literacies’ perspective:

  1. Engage and support maximum stakeholder participation and communication between DIAL project communities of practice, including open debate/forum (live & online), cross college/alumni/industry interaction, course/staff/student level case studies, events, workshops and online resources.
  2. Encourage ‘open’ communities of practice which explore key issues surrounding the development of digitally enhanced practice.
  3. DIAL will align this objective closely with the UAL Strategy 2010-15: Communities of Practice, people and communication priorities.
  4. Carry out interventions and case studies that inquire and inform change and development in individual practice and student engagement that have potential to initiate course level curriculum change.
  5. Integrate DIAL initiatives and resources with the Student Enterprise & Employability Service (SEE) and Staff development and training (Learn IT) to create new resources and paths of inquiry.
  6. Explore key area of career preparation student and alumni representation online skills to create and present professional self; including online presentation skills, personal website development and online professional identities.
  7. Embed DIAL networks and digital literacies developments into UAL web environment, policies and practices.
  8. Develop and encourage more flexible learning opportunities and experiences for staff.
  9. Explore UAL networked online communities within the university and the potential for national and international collaboration from courses, colleges, disciplines, industry and wider sectors.

Below are Year one objectives (these are original objectives revised for year 2)

1.2        Objectives

1       Engage and support maximum stakeholder participation and communication between DIAL project communities of practice, including open debate/forum (live & online), cross college/alumni/industry interaction, course/staff/student level case studies, events, workshops and online resources.

DIAL groups will include the combined experience levels of staff & students and acknowledge that each DIAL participant may be a novice and expert at the same time in their digital domain:

Fig:1

2       The DIAL project will encourage ‘open’ communities of practice and explore key issues surrounding the development of digitally enhanced learning.  DIAL will align this objective closely with the UAL Strategy 2010-15: Communities of Practice, people and communication priorities. DIAL key objectives include:

3       Baseline (mapping the landscape)

  • Identify gaps and best practice in the integration of digitally enhanced learning at UAL.
  • Address key areas and themes identified in the DIAL baseline report

4       Institutional: Support the implementation of digitally enhanced learning and digital support networks

  • Embed DIAL networks and digital literacies developments into UAL web environment, policies and practices
  • Develop and encourage more flexible learning opportunities and experiences for staff
  • Address the ‘time poor’ problems associated with staff development and the integration of digitally enhanced learning at UAL by demystifing and making ‘open’ staff learning/education by developing and exploring new approaches to current time dependant, site specific, closed HR/Learn IT systems and other UAL CPD and PPD initiatives.
  • Increase the involvement of grassroots staff in leading university-wide DL development projects
  • Explore and debate and relationships between digitally enhanced learning and face-to-face in the context of contact time in alignment with UAL project research in contact time (relates to work on Key Information Sets – KIS).
  • Define, debate and test impact of new institutional terms, definitions and policies including: flexible learning, digital citizenship and open education.
  • Test UAL infrastructure, support and policies surrounding the development and integration of digitally enhanced learning.

5       Staff: A) Improved flexible approaches to CPD & PPD staff development B) Support the implementation of digitally enhanced learning into practice)

  • Staff development needs are of fundamental importance in the enhancement of the student experience (HEFCE Online Learning Task Force):
  • Address staff key competencies required for integrating ‘digitally enhanced learning’ into everyday practice and to support CPD & PPD.
  • Introduce and explore notions of flexible learning, open education practice into staff CPD/PPD
  • Explore how ‘flexible learning’ is implemented in staff training and how these methods/culture/style are supported and encouraged for ‘staff learners’ CPD and PPD (e.g. flexible learning benefits realisation subsequently influencing teaching methods and practice).
  • DIAL to encourage, support and collaborate with ‘staff led’ fellowships, secondments and projects’ to mutual benefit of the staff involved and the common good.
  • Explore and debate relationships between digitally enhanced learning and perceived barriers to progressive practice including online identity, time and skills.
  • Explore key problem of participation, what are common patterns or steps into participation.
  • Carry out interventions and case studies that enquire and inform change and development in individual practice and  student engagement and that have potential to initiate course level curriculum change.

6       Students: Improved graduate employability by enhancing presentation skills and professional online identities. 

  • Integrate DIAL initiatives and resources with the new Student Enterprise & Employability Service (SEE),  that brings together the work of Creative Careers, the Enterprise Centre for the Creative Arts (ECCA), Artquest, Own-it and ArtsTemps.
  • Explore key area of career preparation student/alumni representation online skills to create and present professional self; including online presentation skills, personal website development and online professional identities.
  • Explore UAL networked online communities within the university and the potential for national and international collaboration from courses, colleges, disciplines, industry and wider sectors.
  • Enhance student understanding of digitally enhanced learning within the context of flexible learning.
  • Develop confidence and capability to practice more flexible learning approaches
  • Improve perspectives, engagement and understanding of online learning resources.
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DIAL 11/13 Executive summary

A Community based approach to developing digital literacies

Digital integration into Arts Learning (DIAL Project) | University of the Arts London (UAL) | CLTAD | JISC Developing Digital Literacies Programme

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Twitter: @DIALProject

Aims: Cultural change and improved graduate employability

Objectives: Encourage and support self-identifying and sustaining communities of practice in the creation of new resources, processes and learning networks. DIAL provides support, mentorship and incentives and supports partnerships and collaboration across projects.

The DIAL Approach:

  • Encouraging communities of practice
  • Made up of Self-identifying groups and Individuals
  • Encourage Self sustaining and sustainable models
  • Provide small support incentives, replacement hours, student researchers, equipment loans, mentorship, online tools/development and support etc.
  • Encourage and participate in partnerships and collaboration across projects.

What we did:

Baseline blogs: A snapshot overview of UALs digital day-to day practices

DIAL developed & supported Communities of Practice and Interest groups

6X DIAL COP GROUPS

Led and stewarded by the group initiators and participants

Professional Online Identities

Video Presentation Skills

  • 1 x Staff (Project team)
  • 4 x Staff (Participants)
  • 20+ MA Students (Participants)
  • Collaboration partners DIAL, CLTAD, SEE,

Speaking Out. MA LCF Fashion Entrepreneurship

Open & Flexible learning

Drupal UAL

  • 2 x staff 1 student (Project Team)
  • 15 Staff and 5 Students (Participants)
  • Collaboration partners DIAL, CLTAD, UAL CoP fund

Things Unlimited

Online reflective practice TDP projects

  • 1 x Staff (Project team)
  • 70 x Student teachers PG Cert (Participants)
  • Collaboration partners DIAL, CLTAD

6 X COMMUNITY OF INTEREST

DIAL supported the development of Clusters Groups, promoting good practice and sharing interests

Many other DIAL related projects

Research groups, conference groups, experimental groups and new projects in the early stages of development receive support and advice from DIAL

http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/dial-projects-and-activities

“The DIAL resources attached to these core attributes have influenced a staged approach at Glasgow School of Art which aims to provide developmental and iterative initiatives to support existing expertise as well as encourage adapted forms of engaging with emerging technologies.” 

Deliverables

Hundreds of Open Educational Resources (OERs), new model & approach, Video Resources, L & T templates, workshops, case studies, prototypes, unit development, policy development, new terms & standards and new approaches.

Impacts

  • Influenced and supported strategic planning
  • Created new UAL cross college Collaborations for Digital Literacies Support

The DIAL definition of Digital Literacies at UAL

‘Self-identified digital skills and attributes needed to support personal and professional digital practice, ranging from awareness and participation, application of good practice through to participation in emergent and innovative digital practices’.

Lessons learned and reflection

Tools: Finding a balance between face-to-face and digital, understanding staff and students digital needs. Develop projects & rationales that demonstrate needs

People/ Individuals & development: Lots of fear of being unprepared, under supported or ready to engage as a teacher, professional and as a learner in new technologies and digital online practices, staff and students.

“I was the tutor who felt physically sick having to engage with the digital.”

“I’m a young person and I’m terrified of the internet, do not make assumptions”

University Integration: Trust & confidence, address the fear of digital, support and encourage: the DIAL small steps approach, influence local change and strategy, experimentation, grassroots innovation and in-house expertise

College integration: Defining DLs and competencies, an agile and iterative process

Curriculum integration: Huge gap in supporting creative online practice, professional development and learning & teaching. Problems embedding digital literacies in courses with busy courses & teams

Downloads:

  • The DIAL (Institutional Story) Final report only .doc file
  • The DIAL (Institutional Story)  Final report and appendix 1 to 7 here as Zip file
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Appendix 6 local strategy impact example (Pat Christie)

UAL departmental perspective on DIAL impacts and longer term success in terms of stakeholder gains and institutional impact for the report?

Working on the DIAL Project was very timely as it has informed our thinking for some of the strategic priorities we have developed for the new Library Services Strategy 2013-2016, specifically:

  • Academic Support: Support and develop students to become confident independent learners and to fulfil their academic potential
  • Staff: Refine roles and develop staff to achieve our goals

Participation in DIAL also aligned with one of our core values:

  • Forging effective and creative partnerships internally and externally

We believe the experience of being part of DIAL will benefit the work we are planning for academic and research support – the focus of our input is on information and digital literacies and one of our aims is to develop virtual as well as face-to-face support and guidance. The Project has facilitated our engagement with UAL wide debates on digital information literacy, leading to increased reflection on the value of various frameworks and models. This is timely due to the roll out of both the Library Services Strategy and the Academic Support Strategy, in terms of both clarifying the Library Services support offer, and finding ways for staff to share and extend their knowledge of digital information literacy.

The learning gained through DIAL will undoubtedly feed into the development of a new Departmental Staff Development Framework that we intend to launch in 2013/14 as it has raised our awareness of and commitment to digital literacy as a core competence for staff (we hope to create a suite of online resources that relate to digital literacy). It has also provided us with opportunities to experiment with different approaches to learning, initially for our staff, but also potentially for students (our hope is that the 23 things approach that we used for DIAL can be adapted for a range of topics and purposes) and provided us with a practical way to learn about and address issues around OER, licensing and the open access agenda.

The Project has enabled us to take more responsibility for developing learning materials in an incremental manner rather than always looking externally for solutions that are often one-offs and not specific to our needs. Hence, it has introduced us to a more empowering and efficient delivery mode for staff and student training.

Finally, it has enabled greater networking with colleagues engaged in similar activities, and many useful exchanges with the DIAL Project Team, as well as with colleagues in other institutions doing similar projects.

Pat Christie, Director of Information Services and Jessica Crilly, Learning Resources Manager (Resources and Systems)

Posted in Activity & progress, Competencies, Information literacies (group), Senior Management and Strategy | 1 Comment

DIAL at Designs on e-Learning Conference 2013 Wilmington USA

title

The University of North Carolina at Wilmington’s Center for Teaching Excellence is pleased to partner with Penn State University and the University Arts London in hosting the 8th annual Designs on e-Learning Conference. The theme identified for 2 013’s conference is “The Art of Disruptive Engagement”. Slated for September 11, 12 and 13, 2 013 the conference will focus on one of the major challenges of 21st century higher education: determining the optimal uses of emerging technologies for student engagement.

Abstract Author: Chris Follows and DIAL teamDeveloping digital literacies, sharing strategies and approaches by understanding DIAL’s ‘resources of expertise’

Panel Session: This panel presentation aims to provide an overview and insight into the mostly unseen and unknown ‘resources of expertise’ required for developing and delivering sustainable digital literacies projects in UK art and design Higher education.

At the University of the Arts London the DIAL project http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk  (Digital Integration into Arts Learning), partially funded by JISC Developing Digital Literacies Programme, set out to explore digital literacies (DLs) in the arts. DIAL supports a number of self-identifying and mutually supportive communities of staff and students within the university (based on courses, disciplines, departments or other naturally occurring communities) who identify goals for improving their collective digital literacies. Staff and students approach DIAL with proposals of what they would like to do to address their DLs needs rather than the deficit model of waiting to be sent on specific DL training courses for what someone else thinks they need.

The DIAL project has produced many new and evolving ‘resources of expertise’, namely all those who have contributed to the success DIALs unique DL model, these include individuals involved in the DIAL project from: project conception, management, coordination and project development and innovation. All these individuals have brought their own existing and new specialist expertise to create a new combined DIAL ‘resources of expertise’. The project team and participants have shared their experience and expertise openly online, many exploring open educational practice (OEP) for the first time. See all the DIAL projects and activities here: http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/dial-projects-and-activities

Members of the DIAL project team will draw from their experiences of managing and participating in the DIAL project. This paper will highlight the different perspectives and approaches taken by the UAL DIAL project team, including:

  • The DIAL approach, what worked well and what didn’t work so well.
  • Supporting departmental strategic planning by embedding sustainable digital literacies (DL’s) using the communities of practice model (CoP’s) and supporting self-sustainable open practice networks across groups and departments.
  • The pros and cons of supporting cross collaboration in DLs between projects, departments, services and course students and staff.
  • Tools and processes for project managing a cross college DL change programme running multiple complex digital literacy CoP projects.
  • Creating DL project support roles, such as staff and student project coordinators/champions to meet capacity and support a wider project knowledge base.
  • The perspectives of the staff and students who developed DL projects from complex ‘self identifying groups’ into sustainable and productive DL CoPs through realising achievable but complicated goals/targets, applying specialisms, being subject focused and demonstrating independence, self motivation, enthusiasm and passion.

What next for DLs at UAL? DIAL is a change programme and will strive to continue beyond the life of the project and support a sustainable and long-term future for UALs Digital Literacies Programme.

Related text/references

Gauntlett, D. 2011. Making is Connecting: The Social Meaning of Creativity, from DIY and Knitting to YouTube and Web 2.0, Malden, Polity Press.

Lave, Jean & Wenger, Etienne. 1991. Situated Learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. New York: Cambridge University Press

Wenger, E. 1998. Communities of Practice Learning, meaning and Identity. New Yotk: Cambridge University Press

Wenger, E. White, N. and Smith, J.D., 2009. Digital Habitats; Stewarding Technology for Communities. Portland: Cpsquare.

Snowden. D. Jul 11, 2010. The Cynefin Framework [online]   <http://youtu.be/N7oz366X0-8 > [Accessed 02 May 2013].

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Tools and Equipment to support digital practice – IT issues

The university has undergone an incredible amount of change over the past two years in terms of digital tools and environment, including the new website/portals and the new VLE. Many new VLE tools have been introduced, the change from Blackboard to Moodle having the largest impact. Early surveys and feedback from students indicated a desire to have all their core course related material delivered through one VLE portal that worked, DIAL had no projects which engaged with the VLE developments as the UAL have done extensive work before and during the transition. Although DIAL have been involved in related activities as consultants see Delivery of technical resource information online and Digital literacy CPD and a practical pathway into OEP. Because of past and current inadequacies with UALs digital provision staff have avoid using UALs in-house IT systems opting for DIY environments, the previous VLE (Blackboard) was so unpopular, staff started to create their own bespoke VLE spaces outside the UAL IT domain.

Awareness and support

Early in the project, DIAL supported and presented at staff training events which helped staff explore digital processes and tools see: Learning Studio Event at LCF (7/2/12). The DIAL project supported the development and created the online The Learning Studio (LS) group to help cluster and share all the LS activity and resources happening across the six colleges. The LS is intended as a space where staff can learn together, growing into a collaborative learning community, based on their own professional practice. DIAL are also interested in how the LS team share ideas and approaches about how colleges could go about organising their own LS events and try and identify some staff from each college to try and encourage college ownership of the LS events, especially in CCW.

Survey

Which UAL Online Services do you use? This was one of the questions we asked in the DIAL Online Survey (http://tinyurl.com/dialsurvey). Summary of survey results here.

The two main UAL digital tools DIAL used were part of the new UAL VLE portfolio, these were the universities WordPress blogging service, an embedded simple blogging platform for the project reporting and week to week management and communication.

And our second primary tool was an online ‘open practice’ community site http://process.arts.ac.uk , an open source Drupal content management system. Lots of the DIAL project approaches have addressed online and open learning in one way or another; all projects have posted open educational resources OERs, many for the first time. The online reflective practice project was the first group to use the site for their project, see the 60 plus videos uploaded mostly by students/staff for the CLTAD Teaching Development Projects.

The DIAL Baseline report reveled (and was a common feedback throughout the project) “Students and graduates would like a space to communicate together a social space similar to Facebook but not like LinkedIn, somewhere in-between. Graduates have a lot of information and sound advice they could easily and willingly communicate to current students given the right forum/platform….. Students would like more information and guidance in developing their own personal unique web environments, they like to use institutional and social tools but they would also like to be able to develop their own websites personal websites, they would like this integrated into the study as preparation for professional practice.” Feedback notes from Enterprise week workshop – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2011/11/18/feedback-notes-from-enterprise-week-session-%E2%80%98sharing-knowledge-improve-and-develop-professional-identities%E2%80%99/

What is the right platform, many tools are being used, university tools and commercial tools, the university has a long way to go to keep up to date with the pace of technologic developments

Staff Digital Equipment BYOD

Many of the DIAL projects to date have identified a clear need for having the right equipment for the job? DIAL have been helping to identify these new tools and processes but DIAL cannot provide all this equipment to everyone, this has be a problem that is solved by UAL, locally and sustainably, can UAL support this?

“If I want to engage students with online environments it is embarrassing not to have the necessary equipment” (This is a typical example of staff response to the problem of staff using, creating or engaging with online environments and rich media content)

From a DIAL perspective we’re interested in the general problem of staff not having the correct tools for the job in order to use digital in practice. Having access to a PC in a separate office or bring in your own device for essential work related practice is not suitable arrangement for staff who are working in studios with students and who need to interface and interact with software applications and online as part of their practice. We’d like to explore theses challenges so we build a picture of where we are and where were going by talking with courses, colleges and looking at the progress of UALs Desktop Strategy 2011/12 – 2015/16 and how this impacts.

Everywhere you look students seem to be engaging with mobile devices and laptops, well for all those students luckily enough to own one that is, This is a great blog which reinforces this point) and this Information Graphic shows how: Assessing Digital Literacy Levels of Pre-Degree Students can draw out this information as well.  There we’re very few members of staff involved in DIAL projects with university laptops/mobile devices and those that did have were either engaged in digital projects or senior staff so can have this equipment bought for them without question. Many staff have little option, other than to use their own personal equipment, laptops for work, If a member of staff really required a laptop for studio/workshop leaning and teaching then UAL should supply this equipment. Read more.

DIAL has examples of supporting staff who DIAL wanted to work with but couldn’t because of the lack of equipment, DIAL helped these staff prepare and present a use case argument/case study to their colleges to request they buy the equipment they need, as opposed to buying the equipment for them, which would be an unsustainable solution to the problem. See this post by the tutor who worked on the POI project (who got a new laptop from the course) and this project Using iPads in Technical Workshops, who got 6 iPads from the college.

Course website and outward facing course identity

UAL hosting and server Issues and constraints: The DIAL team have first hand experience of UAL constraints having developed course and college web projects in-house before and had a trusted relationship and experience of working with all relevant key UAL staff. It’s widely acknowledged across UAL that the primary constraint for web innovation at UAL is lack of IT server access and support.

Why an institutional server? An in-house server provides a safe and stable ‘affiliated institutional space’, which supports early stakeholder confidence and longer-term participation and contribution. Previous in-house projects working with institutionally supported IT services have encountered problems setting up internally funded server spaces, the primary problem is the amount of time it takes to agree server provision. Most staff buy server space outside the university and using commercial platforms, these are unsustainable and hard to maintain in the long term and an unnecessary financial and technical burden for courses to adopt.

Please see the No Name project at CSM as a good example of need for an outward facing course identity:

“The Centre for Performance needs an outward facing web site.  It is intended to be a ‘must have’ bookmark on all students’ computers and they would frequently look in and some would be able to contribute to the site.  Where there are resources available to watch or download, links to other sites, a blog spot, examples of current research by external practitioners and students, an App and Tech spot, a place to exchange skills. It will need to host a Wiki type area for the Lexicon that is currently being developed and other pages for resources and current practice and debate”. Read more.

IT problems:

Those lucky enough to have in-house server space have to then navigated further constraints and problem with time it takes for sites to go live or having the correct set-ups or having a reliable network support e.g. IT support, server access, security, slowness and firewalls etc.

We have heard many people say it can take 15 to 20 minutes or more to login to the UAL clone computers; this can take 20 minutes out of a workshop event or class or in some cases cancels classes. When logged in the computers can be DEADLY slow! Some software does not work with the UAL clone or remote updates can even interrupt study:

“So frustrating! I was working on my edit when this interruption happened..I have to get my work done, as I have a deadline next week, on the MA Fine art course. Its really held me up and i’m not sure if i will get it done now.I just do not understand why they don’t do these updates at the weekend, or in the evening or over christmas?! Our course on the MA is only a 1 year course so I am really mindful of the fact that time is very crucial. I’d really like IT to respond to this promptly, we really cant have this happening next term when we start to have really major deadlines. Its not good enough”. Baseline comment Ellen Angus MA Fine Art

We also have seen more IT/network savvy staff and students at UAL willing to come forward and challenge the UAL IT jargon and set ups:

“Perhaps this is the reason why there are network problems such as delays of login in and slow internet access? Could it be due to using illegal DNS names (causing timeouts while trying to lookup ip addresses or reverse DNS names) and routing that is sent round in circles rather then directly to external router. This is a traceroute from the machines in the university (in particular Wimbledon), it seems quite odd?” Student baseline comment

DIAL fed these comments and more back to Graham Eastwood IT Strategy Consultant, and consultation process, DIAL requested the basics be addressed before anything else. E.g. academic and technical Requirements for the next 18 months including

-       Some discussion or review on current staff and student desk top environments which address the basic issues of, current inadequacies with:

  • Slow login and operating corporate clone system
  • Corporate clone improvements needed (bug fixes and how the clone or IT intervention can reduce/damage the PC or device performance)
  • Too many restrictions and over security
  • More administration rights for staff (ownership of systems)
  • Computers need to be fit for service for art and design purpose (including staff desktops e.g. all having web cams, faster processers, mobile tech etc.)

-       Server issues, make easier to access and request server space

-       Sandbox environments for individuals and groups.

-       Better service and support for projects, and departments providing online services.

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Web coding with Freeformers at LCC

DIAL and SEE met with http://www.freeformers.com/ and looked at possible collaborations with them and UAL students and alumni with an aim of delivering web code training and industry connections.

IMG_5466

The Event:
I thought it was a great day and the students all seemed to be having fun and learning loads, well done team Freeformers!
The turn out was amazing and it would be great to have the Comms teams talk about this and give advice to other comms teams for future sessions about what they did to promote the event?
The training team were brilliant, they did a great job at communicating the information, was a little fast at the end and some more discussion with the students during the code training may be good (I missed the last session where the students explore ideas, but this concept could be introduced earlier in the session I think with some more examples of how code can be applied, get their creative thinking going earlier?).
I loved the warm up session and the lego session – great, am a big fan of the Cynefin Framework now thanks for that Freeformers!
The screens and sound were an issue and this needs to be better for future sessions. I managed to follow along even with doing emails at the same time, got a bit lost a few times but got saved by the student next to me who was loving the session and kept saying, UAL should do more of this sort of thing. She was a final year and time is of a premium so I was impressed she was there and this shows the value students place on this sort of activity and engagement.
These sessions seem to be designed or would appeal to the 18 – 24
The digital space at LCC yet again managed to accommodate this style of event collaboration without a problem (Wish we had a digital space in every college!). Other colleges could not accommodate events and digital workshops like this, non-course or college digital events, alumni friendly e.g. open visitor access to logins etc. digital demo spaces and the college contacts like to help coordinate such events.
The main issue I can see in holding similar events like this in the future are how Freeformers aligns with the UAL and who are your UAL partners in this process, who’s got the time/interest to support them to carry out these events? We need to try and replicate the support in other colleges that we had at LCC and this can be tricky as they all operate in many different ways.
We should also look at the wider picture here at UAL, as I know there are courses at UAL who do similar training to this as part of their course, it would be good to get UAL courses to be made aware and contribute/align to the process in some way.
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WCA staff development day DIAL presentation

Please see slides from the WCA staff development day DIAL presentation, about 20 academic staff, the session was followed by many interesting questions, including will DIAL continue and how can staff make use of the training and resources being coordinated and developed by DIAL. Staff can view all resources (many still being developed) here. We are hopeful DIAL will continue beyond 2013, all expressions of interest and support are welcome, please add your thoughts below in the comments section of this post.

Here’s the link for those interested in the NAM http://conflictandmedia.arts.ac.uk  (you will need to login to see research content)

Slides can be view below or on slideshare here.

Download presentation below and all slide images.IFrame

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DIAL at APT 2013

Conference presentation APT 2012 - Download ppt and slideshare.

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POI Programme – Feedback on understanding good practice for improving Social visibility

Understanding good practice for improving Social visibility Continue reading

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UAL badges first meeting

DIAL applied and received a small amount of funding to explore badges designs, following our first meeting there seems to be great potential for badges especially with potential use with SEE future work. DIAL will pilot the design and integration of badges on some of the DIAL projects. See UAL badges proposal here.

To kick off the project the DIAL project designer will be given the task of researching and designing a series of ‘open badge icon images’ for the DIAL project to pilot alongside our current projects and the The Professional Online Identities POI Programme.

One of the key considerations is how to introduce the badge concept at HE level, and potentially to staff and students of all ages. The badge experiment will be mainly trailed to test how it could potentially support employability, hard and soft skills.  Drupal UAL will be our pilot group:

UAL Badges: things to consider:

-      We want this to be a free and fun experiment without too many pre-existing or restrictive requirements.

-      Governance, how are the badges going to be issued,     displayed and implemented

-       Relevance – what use are the badges?

-       Consistency across projects, design and implementation

-       UAL identity, do we need it on the badge?

-       Different audiences – perspectives

-       How they relate to in-house learning – teaching –PPD

-       ‘Badge’ name should it be called a badge

-       Badge title e.g.  – Drupal UAL – award name – and UAL

-       Standard template required as a starting point for all badges

-       Do we create our own platform and process or use Mozilla Open badges: - http://www.openbadges.org/about/

UAL badges for Drupal UAL I’m not sure badges would work for this group but I’m willing to give it a go, if they were to work they would have to be radically rethought and designed to fit the context. I’d like to avoid the terms beginner, starter, intermediate, master, expert etc. if possible, for the reasons of digital footprint. I am seeing more and more requests for ‘digital recall’ where individuals from the past request certain posts relating to them be removed. If a Drupal participant was to be badged with beginner and they then become an expert Drupal developer they maynot appreciate the old badge showing up in searches?

Governance, how are the badges going to be issued, displayed and implemented

Who is going to manage the badges and under what rules? It makes sense to have badges managed by the tutor or group leader and to make there relevance meaningful in context of the community and commitment rather than only personal skill progression. The badge would also be associated to work in that community rather than only in Drupal development skills etc. For the below I’ve referenced my earlier Open University SCORE fellowship work where I looked at types of practice in relation to open practice and also the Visitors and Residents work by Dave White and during the meeting came up with the following badge system (rough ideas). We could also reference and look at how all this could potentially integrate with Mozilla Open badges: - http://www.openbadges.org/about/, although it seems bet to try an trial a small local pilot so we can experiment risk free, locally and freely.

The below badge list with all names of those associated/given the badge will reside (as evidence) on a special Drupal UAL developers page as part of the resource group. This page has the potential to become very useful for anyone searching for a web developer/s to employ. The badge would also be added to the Drupal UAL site home profile pages and could be copied on to as many other platforms as respondent wishes.

I’ve created a temporary placeholder badge (image right) to help structure and visualise how the badges may fit.

UAL badgeBadge type: Community badge

-       What Community: Drupal UAL

-       Community coordinators: Tutors/group leaders names

-       Community Badges available:

  • Drupal UAL: Visitor – Anyone who has attended a Drupal UAL workshop and are happy to be associated to the group with a Drupal UAL: Visitor status. They are interested in keeping in contact with the group, not in any participatory way but to keep a distant eye on the developments and resources.
  • Drupal UAL: Member – An active participant in the group, attended workshops and posted a ‘resource’ online to the community. They are a participant at their own pace they may dip in and out of the group but generally contribute only every now and then when time. Starting to develop on first Drupal install.
  • Drupal UAL: Resident - An active participant in the group, and supporting others in the group, may support training sessions and add resources to the group regularly. Have fully developed a live website or more.

 

  • Drupal UAL: STUDENT Developer – A UAL student who is a UAL Drupal developer
  • Drupal UAL: STAFF Developer – A UAL staff member who is a UAL Drupal developer

Non-Drupal UAL badges (general badges) could include:

  • Open Practice badges – Community Stewarding Peer interaction and support
  • Open practitioner
  • Comment support
  • Open education resource provider – instructional video – resource hand-outs – blogger
  • Online webinar

Please tag all related Badges posts with 

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DIAL support for The Teaching and Professional Fellowship

As the final report of this project emerges, here is a short reflection on the context within which it was developed, as well as where it might lead us. By Gabriela Daniels

The Teaching and Professional Fellowship “Learning videos- do they work for you” benefitted from its close association with the DIAL project.  The project proposal’s aim and objectives were developed with the personal support from the DIAL and ALTO project managers, and with the help of video resources and papers on OER made available via Processarts, and the DIAL blog.    A key project objective was to contribute to enhancing learning and teaching practices by creating guidelines for producing and embedding learning videos in practical workshops. This objective is closely aligned with the DIAL objective to explore issues around digitally enhanced practices.   The range of information provided by the DIAL and associated blogs informed our project’s activities (i.e. postings on: http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/cltad-teaching-development-projectshttp://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/05/25/should-ual-evaluate-digital-skill-levels-of-staff-and-students/) Continue reading

Posted in Activity & progress | 3 Comments

Benefits of DIAL to the Student Engagement (Digital) project:

Benefits of DIAL to the Student Engagement (Digital) project:

by Charlotte Webb My digital life project manager (http://mydigitallife.myblog.arts.ac.uk)

  • The work of the Professional Online Identities group is of interest to the SE project ‘audience’ (students engaged in digital tech) and the POI event at LCC was really useful for gaining an insight into what kinds of advice and guidance students are seeking, as well as in giving me ideas for successful event formats.
  • There is a reciprocal benefit between DIAL and Student Engagement (digital) in terms of community building – e.g. I recently circulated a message about the POI workshops to my My Digital Life mailing list and a student booked straight on – so we are sharing resources and networks.
  • I will use DIAL as a case study, with a focus on the students who have been involved in setting up and running the projects (e.g. DIALogue students and others) – this is a good example of student engagement with projects.
  • It has been useful to join group discussions about digital literacy. Developing digital literacy is not the scope of the student engagement project, but is a related area of interest/concern, and it is very useful to work with the DIAL team to ensure that we are not duplicating efforts, and are pooling resources.

As a new project manager DIAL has been a useful resource for my reference, and discussions with Chris about how to progress the project have been informative and helpful.

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Library Services things Unlimited update for DIAL draft final report

Library Services things Unlimited project update for the DIAL project draft final report. This project focuses on digital information literacy, addressing this initially through a process of discussion and confidence building with Library Services staff. See project overview. Continue reading

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DIAL engagement and influence in UALs strategic and departmental planning

During year one of the DIAL project we addressed cultural change in two ways, local and institutionally: locally, we piloted the DIAL CoPs, see year one evaluation here. DIAL also focused on the larger issues of institutional cultural change through senior management engagement and UAL strategic alignment, please see DIAL senior management and strategy engagement, including UAL Strategic Development SMT meeting.  As the project progressed we found the latter local/departmental/course approach to be the more effective in terms of cultural change. We found the local projects were a good method for influencing and supporting (creating partnerships) with the small strategic objectives of central services or departments, which in turn eventually we hope will feed into the bigger UAL DL institutional evolving landscape. This localised/departmental and embedded approach to influencing and supporting (creating partnerships) strategic planning/road maps was achieved through the experience gained from ongoing DIAL projects and activities. Please see some examples of this below:

Organisational Development and Learning working in partnership with DIAL: OD&L are considering supporting/taking DIAL forward the in four areas, by working in partnership - Please see notes (Read more here) from Anna Petts Head of UALs Organisational Development and Learning OD&L. The meeting was a welcome and timely opportunity to reflect on the Professional On-line Identities project (POI) collaborative work DIALSEE and Learn IT have been involved in over the past year and a half.

Library Services Strategy (Pat Christie): ‘Define and communicate the Library Services offer within the context of University provision, focusing on information and digital literacy’ DIAL have been working closely with library services and DIAL projects specifically Things Unlimited project will go on to inform future library DL policy and processes. (Departmental strategy 3 year road maps)

Open UAL (policy proposal) – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2013/05/14/open-ual/

DIAL has been regularly contributing to UALs new strategy developments:

  • IPR policy,
  • IT strategy
  • Information Strategy Steering Group ISSG and
  • E-Learning Strategy Group (ELSG)
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Reflections on the DIAL – Learn IT collaboration

Please see updates below from Christine Kelly from Learn IT reflecting on the Professional On-line Identities project (POI) collaborative work DIALSEE and Learn IT have been involved in over the past year and a half:

  • What benefits has your project delivered and who are the beneficiaries?

The Professional Online Identity project has enabled cross collaboration for Learn-IT with other key stakeholders within the University, SEE, CLTAD, DIAL and various Associate Lecturers. It has highlighted the benefits of pooling the talent and expertise within these teams, enhances this and future projects within the UAL and shares knowledge and expertise of each department. It has also benefited the staff and student engaged in the project, which can be fully evaluate with further feedback after the final course delivery. Continue reading

Posted in Activity & progress, Online identities project, Profile & identity | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Refocusing of our strategy

How does DIAL align with the new refocusing of our strategy?

See DIAL projects and activities

  • UAL’s strategic plan under review in light of rapid changes in both sector and economy
  • Three major areas identified as particularly important for review and focus:
  • Student experience
  • Internationalisation
  • Postgraduate strategies

 

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JISC Cluster meeting 26 April 2013

JISC Cluster meeting 26 April 2013 Chris Follows & John Jackson, University of Arts London, Meeting of London JISC Digital literacies Programme projects, UCL, 26 April 2013.

Screen Shot 2013-04-29 at 12.17.52Our cluster group (4 London DL projects) all gave project overviews.

  • Digital literacies as a postgraduate attribute – Institute of Education, University of London
  • The digital department – University College London
  • Digital literacies in transition – University of Greenwich
  • Digital integration into arts learning – University of the Arts London

Slides – http://www.slideshare.net/ProcessArts/dl-jisc-dial-cluster-meeting

Posted in JISC events | 1 Comment

Video presentation skills workshops – lessons learned

The lessons we learned:

  • This group were generally fairly comfortable already with speaking and videoing themselves. This could be because they were MA students studying entrepreneurship.
  • They all found using the Flip camera fine
  • The biggest improvement was how the structure of their video pitches improved – this was highlighted in the group’s feedback and in our observations. The elevator pitch training seemed to be very useful in relation to this.
  • Confidence also improved. This seemed mainly to do with practice in the practical exercises, repetition of the elevator pitch and having to video themselves. The exercises where the students practiced their pitch and gave each other feedback (using a criticism sandwich) seemed effective for this
  • Getting the right distance from the person (whether too close or too far) is a consideration, as some of the sound in some of the videos were too quiet
  • Choosing a suitable background too makes a difference to the ambience of the video
  • Quite a few of the students filmed in portrait. Perhaps better to do it in landscape due to the fact that video players are landscape, but not a big issue
  • Noticed that there could be a possibility that over-training or preparation around the videos could decrease the natural energy that some of the students expressed in their first videos
  • The critiquing of the videos worked well, with peer feedback both verbally and written – it was really useful to give participants to be reflective, share feedback and to discuss openly.
  • Participants were slightly reluctant to give negative feedback. Encourage students to use the criticism sandwich and make sure they include the constructive criticism in the middle. Perhaps include this on the printed feedback form, eg include one positive thing and one thing that could be improved on.
  • Technical issues! To be honest, these plagued us throughout, even though I am pretty comfortable with tech. The Flip cameras were all easy to use. The sound in the main lecture theatre for the first workshop didn’t work and we had to get a technician to fix it, it took quite a long time uploading the videos in the workshop break, and an equally long time getting the video player to work (VLC seemed to be the best option) – if you don’t use video players it is best to familiarise yourself in advance! The worst tech problems happened in the final evaluation workshop while using the large touch screens in the classrooms at High Holborn. The touch screen was pretty inaccurate and it was really hard work loading lots of videos, and trying to flip those recorded in portrait so they were upright. One participant came over to help, and we ended up with virtual scribbles over the screen instead! It ended up with me using my MacBook stood up on its side showing the videos to the students, which was really quite ridiculous. And even then, the sound on some videos was very quiet as they had been taken a bit too far away – the mic on the Flips isn’t particularly powerful. Phew!
  • Attendance – we were expecting up to 20 students, but there were only 6 – luckily they were all dedicated and returned for all the workshops and it was easier doing the pilot on a small scale. But scheduling is clearly something important to think about, and the students were in the middle of doing big hand-ins, so the Course Director said it is definitely worth trying to schedule away from any other major activity to encourage attendance
  • We could have done it in a single or two workshops, rather than three – that was the feedback from the students, and we agreed
  • General staff time – everyone involved was very busy and it’s challenging for everyone to find enough time. Though now a workshop structure is more develop, that won’t be so much of an issue for staff wanting to deliver it
  • Equipment – all students opted to use the Flips rather than their mobiles. We had enough for our six students to have one per pair, you could need quite a lot for a larger group
  • Some sort of training around technical equipment – given the difficulties we had, I imagine others will do too. So it would be useful to develop guidance around downloading videos (especially if recorded on students smartphones), naming conventions of videos to ensure that they are easy to locate at a later date, basic training or guidance to using video players such as VLC, including how to adjust volume, rotate videos that have been recorded as portrait etc
  • We didn’t include uploading videos to YouTube or Vimeo, and then embedding in blogs or websites, so that would be useful to produce or locate guidance on this for students
  • We just did one-minute videos without any editing, but video editing would be a useful skill to develop as well

 

Posted in presentations skills (group) | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Process.arts interviews DIAL’s new Coordinators – Kaye Pryce (KP) and Rossella Emanuele (RE)…

What does DIAL stand for?

DIAL (Digital Integration into Arts Learning) is in the change business. It’s a cultural change programme comprising of a network of self-identifying communities within UAL. DIAL helps these communities (made up of students and staff) to express and assess their digital literacies and cultivate processes, resources and toolkits, which in turn support the communities’ development and growth.

What is a typical day for a DIAL Coordinator?

KP: Most days, we support Chris and 18 (and counting) self-identifying communities cultivated by the programme. My involvement can range from: answering telephone and email queries, editing and contributing to resources, helping to plan events, writing and responding to posts, research to just serving as a sounding board. I like the nature of my job – the work is challenging and at times demanding, but knowing that I can contact Chris or Rossella when necessary is very reassuring.  I am encouraged to be creative and allowed a fair amount of freedom to perform my duties without being micro-managed on a daily basis. It’s one of the most rewarding job I’ve had – everyday is different!

RE: As we have just started a couple of weeks ago, so far a typical day has been attending meetings with Chris where Kaye and myself have been introduced as new appointed DIAL Coordinators to a number of projects that DIAL is supporting. We met many members of staff across UAL that have proposed and want to organize a project on Digital Literacy and would need DIAL support for realizing it and got a sense of what requirements they need. The overall numbers of projects that DIAL is currently involved with so far are 18th – for details see http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/all-project-groups – we have been introduced to 8.
Here as some:

  • POI – Professional Identities
  • No name project
  • Fred Millar – Lego serious player
  • Things Unlimited
  • Digital Video Presentation skills
  • David Simms questionnaire at LCC
  • Drupal will happen soon
  • Digital Literacy will also coming up soon

How is the team structured?

We’re a small team headed up by Chris Follows – Project Manager, with an Advisory Board and two DIAL Coordinators, Kaye Pryce (KP) and Rossella Emanuele (RE) in tow.

What were your first impressions of DIAL?

KP: I had no idea what DIAL was about, what my involvement would or could be or what impact it would have on my understanding of digital literacy. After much background reading, talking to Chris and colleagues, I thought, bring it on.

RE: I started the job with some understanding of what DIAL does, as I had already been involved in supporting Chris since September 2012, and had also previous knowledge of the DIAL program because in 2010, when Chris Follows started his research into Digital Literacy I worked with him at Wimbledon. So my first impression was filtered by this knowledge, nevertheless I wasn’t aware of the amount of work that Chris developed since then and the number of projects that were now involved. The expansion of the project has been incredible and I could see also the potential for further expansion though I felt I had quite a bit of catching up to do to get up to speed…

What’s your understanding of digital literacy?

KP: I had a vague idea what it was but found it hard to describe. I am inclined to agree with Josie Fraser, social and educational technologist, Leicester City Council, who said,  “…digital literacy = digital tool knowledge + critical thinking + social engagement…its main characteristics [is that]:

it supports and helps develop traditional literacies
it’s a life-long practice
it’s about skills, competencies and critical reflection on how these skills and competencies are applied
it’s about social engagement”.

Ultimately the term can’t be defined easily – it’s significance and meaning is personal, it’s individual. It will represent different things from person to person, from generation to generation, from culture to culture, from country to country and so on.

RE: I think much has already been said about Digital Literacy and we can find various definitions for it and what the concept entails. I tend to think of Digital Literacy as an elastic concept: it doesn’t matter how much one knows about it will always stretch out further and there will always be new areas that challenge ones knowledge. I believe having an attitude to want to learn more about Digital Literacy is essential, as a concept, DL seems to continuously redefining itself. It is a fact that is now embedded in any form of cultural/creative undertaking and/or exchange and more… So we can’t get away from it!

Does the DIAL Coordinator post live up to your expectations?

KP: The job description gave me some indication what I was signing up for but as ever, the reality is different. Much has happened in the programme’s 18-month lifetime. Having to recall projects, names, meetings, deadlines, posts, opinions, incidences and technologies to name but a few – can be daunting. It feels like a Pandora’s Box of information which is as wide as it is deep.

It is really helpful that much of DIAL’s journey is captured online, with new items and contributors being added constantly. I rely on Chris’ knowledge, guidance and delegation – because he has a good handle on what’s what.

Overall, my experience has been a tidal wave of excitement, great interest and intrigue. Whilst I fully know and understand the premise of DIAL, my ability to apply that knowledge and understanding in a timely manner can be easier said than done.

RE: It is early stage to give an informed answer to this question; a proper feedback on the experience would be more accurate by the end of the 6 months. For now is all quite exciting and I am enjoying the work and found most of the projects we have been introduced very interesting. On a practical note it definitely requires taking in a lot of information quite quickly, good time management, ability to clearly identify priorities, as there is lots to do! The communication between myself Chris and Kaye is really quite an important aspect of the job I think, as we all need to be aware of the bigger picture and represent DIAL but at the same time individually taking the lead of some projects mainly to take some workload off Chris shoulders!

What happens post July 2013?

In its current form, the DIAL Project will come to an end. By which time, a final report will be drawn up by Chris, designed to measure the impact and outcomes of the self-identifying communities. Ultimately, DIAL aims to ensure that all self-identifying communities can be autonomous and sustainable in their individual development programmes and use the report findings to secure permanent funding.

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Thoughts on developing a Digital Literacy open course

The DIAL project at UAL would be interested in creating or contributing to a Digital Literacy MOOC from user generated content and resources developed from its open content communities and DIAL projects on process.arts. We’d hope to experiment with independently developed and openly managed online learning pathways created and managed by interested groups and specialists. We aim to develop and design a pilot MOOC with specific pathways for bespoke training in particular Digital Literacy specialism e.g like Professional Online Identities http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/professional-online-identities and including other project resources to support; such as open educational practices, digital presentation skills (presenting using video) and IPR/creative commons etc….

We aim to develop and integrate pathways similar to this DIAL project Prototype thing: (this is a library specific template example, the aim is to provide a resource that filters information with relevant focus) we would adapt it for more generic use on process.arts.

Open source tools for MOOCS

We have been using a few true open source tools at UAL (Drupal, Moodle and Mahara). We are looking at using process.arts for the MOOC pilot as this currently offers the functionality and environment we need and is easily adaptable for small changes. We have started a drupal/open source community of practice at UAL to support open source web development initiatives – http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/drupal-ual .

Lots of students and staff have never heard of open source software development tools, so there can be a greater dependance on overpriced commercial alternatives, not sustainable in the long term.

The in-house open source/drupal community aims to empower web-users to become web-makers which supports sustainable and agile development of these new tools. We’ve been training/employing our staff and students as our drupal developers for process.arts (an experienced in-house developer is essential in this mix, fortunately we had one) – you can read more in this report - http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/score-fellowship-final-report-chris-follows  

Servers are the primary contentious issue  in my opinion and seems to be the problem for most uk colleges that their in-house IT set ups are not really in tune with the technological innovation needs of those who are pushing the boundaries of the ‘institution’.

Examples of one experience can be seen here:

Process.arts overview and context – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/processarts-overview-and-context-1st-draft

Conflict and Media – http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/nam-web-development-overview-and-update-30042012

Unless things change it may be best to look outside the institution in future, there are lots of commercial server setups to choose from, but ideally there is a lot to be gained from using in house server provision but the negatives far out way the positives at the moment, this could, in the long term, be a huge problem for universities who are so far behind the game that they have no other option than to use a commercial alternative/channels as primary instead of in-house as primary. This can be seen in rich media and community networks. I talk a bit more about this here - http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/itunes-ual and here - http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/have-we-right-balance-between-open-education-and-commercial-social-media   

Posted in MOOC, Open education (group), Open source | Tagged | 2 Comments

How can I contribute to DIAL?

Add content and comments to the DIAL blog and baseline blogs:

In this video we walk through the process of joining my.blog.arts and joining group blogs like the DIAL UAL baseline blogs – http://ualdigitalbaseline.myblog.arts.ac.uk/

YouTube Preview Image

Baseline links – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/digital-baseline-links/

Call for expressions of interest for DIAL small projects, support & case studies

UAL’s Digital Integration into Arts Learning (DIAL) project aims to carry out a small number of staff and student led projects and case studies, which will explore the pace of technological change and its impact on the day-to-day practices.

See more here – http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/expressions-of-interest/

 

Posted in Dissemination | 2 Comments

DL Cluster meeting Nov 2012

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DIAL Evaluation Report Year 1

DIAL Evaluation Report

Duna Sabri

October 2012

Introduction

This report evaluates the progress of four projects within the JISC-funded UAL Project DIAL (Digital Integration into Arts Learning).   This two year project is coming up to the end of its first year of operation.  This report offers a formative evaluation, in line with JISC guidance on project evaluation.

DIAL was conceived as a network of:

‘self-identifying communities within UAL’ which were to ‘articulate their digital literacies goals and aspirations, assess their existing skills and confidence levels, and develop processes to support their development, including the generation of resources…’ (DIAL bid p.3)

This evaluation (Report for year 1 – final) focused on 4 pilot project communities that were established in the first year:

Open educational resources community – led by Chris Follows and John Casey

Information literacies among library staff  – led by Jessica Crilly

Presentation skills among student entrepreneurs  – led by Laura North

 Online reflective practice for participants of the PG Cert in Academic Practice in Art,  Design and Communication – led by Lindsay Jordan

 The data sets for the evaluation of each of the above projects comprised:

  1. An initial discussion about the aims of the project during January 2012 from which notes were produced by the researcher and in some in cases amended by the project leaders.
  2. A follow up interview with project leaders in July 2012 which was recorded and transcribed.
  3. Feedback from community members about the aspect of digital literacy that each project addressed.  This was collected and analysed by project leaders for the purposes of their own projects, and then, used for comparative purposes by the researcher.

The purpose of the initial discussions was to gain an understanding of project goals, the boundaries of the community to which they related, and the extent to which an assessment of skills and confidence levels had already been undertaken; and to identify a strategy for evaluation.  The follow-up interviews took the notes from the first discussion as their starting point and sought to understand what processes had been put in place to support development, what had been achieved, and what evidence was available in the form of feedback from community members.  To differing extents, in each case a transition had taken place in which project leaders’ conceptions of their goals had shifted and accordingly their processes for development, and the interviews often included a discussion about how evaluation strategies could be re-configured as well.

JISC evaluation guidance suggests the following questions to guide evaluation:

  1. What have we done/built/achieved, to what quality and how efficiently?
  2. What has been learned or confirmed through development activities?
  3. How has the learning been acted on and fed back into decision-making?

The first two to of these questions are addressed in the course of this report, and it is intended that the discussion of this report, is a contribution to ‘feeding back into decision-making’.  The report incorporates comments from the project leaders as a first step in this process.  In addition to addressing these questions, this report attempts to place these four DIAL projects in a broader institutional context.

Initial observations about the four pilot projects

The aspirations for each of the projects have their roots in group leaders’ reflections on their own roles and emerged from long-standing challenges that they wanted to tackle, and perhaps up to then had not had the time or resources to attend to them.  The issues they wanted to tackle could not be dealt with in a piece-meal day-to-day way but, they felt, would benefit from an injection of attention and resource that DIAL was to bring.  However, the resourcing of the projects, with one exception, relied exclusively on the goodwill and enthusiasm of the project leaders and, furthermore, the goodwill and enthusiasm that they were expected to generate among those that they sought to engage in their project community.

There was an affective dimension to all the projects that was related to the particular kind of digital literacy that they sought to develop.  The relationship between the affective and the technological varied from project to project.  For example, online reflection dealt with teachers’ fear of learning in public, open access resources touched on the discomfort of making curricular resources public, and presentation skills development addressed anxieties relating to presenting oneself.

All of the projects were aiming to make some use of the relationships between different members of their target communities.  Some planned to get more literate/confident members to work with less literate/confident members, others aimed to bring together opposing views, staff working on similar courses from different colleges, or students from different cohorts.  The configurations varied depending on how the projects defined their particular hurdles.

How did the projects develop between January and July 2012?

In this section I take each project in turn and summarise the transition from initial aspirations to engagement with project communities.

Project 1: Open Educational Resources

The aim of this project is to expand the number of people who produce open educational resources (OER) and upload them to Arts Learning and Teaching Online (ALTO).  John and Chris, the project leaders, wanted to generate debate about OER that would address fears, misconceptions and aspirations in relation to OER.  They also aimed to review what had already been achieved in ALTO and ALTO UK with a view to informing their strategies for generating debate and awareness.

The first of these objectives was pursued through the conduct of focus groups with UAL staff in colleges.  These were conducted at CSM, LCF, Chelsea and Wimbledon.  Other significant discussions were held in other fora, notably at the Academic Leaders’ Forum, and on an impromptu basis in other settings.  The focus groups were exploratory and aimed to develop an understanding the range of meanings and responses that participants  attached to OER.

The data from these discussions resulted in the creation of a typology of awareness and engagement in OER.  This is intended for use as a diagnostic tool that allows individuals to see where they are in context – it allows them to recognise that there are different stages of engagement and that a period, sometimes a long period, of experimentation, is part of that.

There were also intentions to gain an overview through a systematic analysis of current users of ALTO but this was not carried out: partly through lack of time and possibly because it was not clear how such an analysis could be used.

In parallel with the planned activities in relation to this OER project two related developments promoted the systematic development of OER: the first was that Chris and John contributed to the development of a module on OER for UAL’s PG Cert; and the second was that Process Arts became a UAL service supported by the e-learning team.

Project 2: Information literacies among library staff

This project aimed to improve digital literacy among library staff as a precursor to developing library staff’s capacity to help students develop their digital information skills, such as, for example, evaluating online resources.  There were two inter-linked challenges facing this project: first to define the community of library staff that would participate in the project, and the second was to sustain the ambitious project activities with limited resources.  The project was originally led by David Bracegirdle as well as Jessia Crilly, but David withdrew when he took on new responsibilities.

Initially the project aimed to produce a resource inspired by the ‘twenty-three things’ format (such as that produced for researchers at the University of Huddersfield) and developed it into ‘unlimited things’.  Early on in the project, the two leaders identified that they did not know enough about the level and extent of digital literacy among library staff.  With this in mind, they initiated a discussion on Process-Arts which attracted a limited number of contributions – 11- but in excess of 900 viewings.  The discussion was about what tools individuals used, how they saw their levels of expertise, what they wanted to develop, and what they perceived to be the barriers.   In addition, they commissioned a survey of library staff at a Library Services Conference which drew 52 responses and appears to offer a reasonable overview.  At the time of writing it is not clear how representative this sample is of library staff as a whole.  Whilst some follow-up work may be needed to establish whether particular sub-groups may be under-represented, the survey seems at last to have established some characteristics of the target community for this project which might then form the basis of the design of ‘unlimited things’.

Project 3: Presentation skills among student entrepreneurs

The purpose of this project was firmly rooted in a survey of 160 students which was undertaken as part of a Teaching and Professional Development Fellowship.  The evidence from this survey suggested that there was both a need for art and design students to present in particular contexts and that they tended to find ‘nervewracking’ the experience of being filmed while speaking.  The idea of asking students to _develop a one-minute video pitch to present themselves or their project to potential clients, investors or a wider audience arose in collaboration with a lecturer, Chitra Buckley, who taught postgraduate students on the MA Fashion Entrepreneurship course. The project combined presentation skills development with digital literacy, both of which were relevant to the work of SEE.

The project defined its community as the students taking part in the MA course, but there was also a more general awareness of a wider group of students from other courses who could also benefit, and a sense that ways of working were being trialled and explored with a view to replicating equivalent experiences in other course contexts. With this in mind resources are being developed, including a video and workshop descriptions, in order to help other staff deliver similar workshops.

A series of three workshops was devised in collaboration with Chitra which six students attended. This revolved around alternating experiences of hands-on practice of recording one-minute pitches, and receiving peer feedback on the results.  Whilst there were numerous logistical difficulties, the project design included two data-sets of evaluation: the students’ perceptions of the experience and the students’ written feedback to each other about their presentations.  The first indicated that students quite often got over feelings of embarrassment, were intrigued by the process and threw themselves into the experimentation.   The second data-set indicated they had observed that the content and structure of the video pitches had improved.  It also revealed a great deal of potential for helping students to articulate and debate what would constitute a ‘good’ one-minute pitch in their particular context.

Project 4: Online reflective practice for participants of PG Cert in Academic Practice in Art, Design and Communication

This project shared with the presentation skills project an aspiration to help its community members to overcome an affective dimension of digital literacy.  The premise of this project was that ‘learning openly’ has intrinsic value for individuals and promoted collaboration and social learning.  At first the community was defined as all those engaging in online reflective practice who could be accessed through an already planned survey of blog-users.  The community definition shifted to the group of staff who were undertaking two core modules on the PG Cert in Academic Practice.  The line of questioning also shifted from being directly focused on the affective dimension of open online reflection to being more holistic, thus allowing Lindsay to situate the affective dimension in a broader context of other aspects of personal motivation and social contexts.

This group was surveyed about two tasks: the first was blogging monthly about set readings and providing peer feedback in small groups about other students’ blogs; the second was the experience of producing a short video encapsulating the conclusions of their teaching development projects.  The first survey attracted 24 responses and the second 17.  It is important to note that as well as in-depth feedback from these participants, Lindsay’s own interpretations of her own and the students’ experiences form an important part of the data for this project.

Anxieties about the openness of online reflection seemed to have dissipated and given way to larger concerns about such issues as technical know-how, the relative contributions of group members, and the difficulties of finding time to do the work.  In response to the question ‘how do you think this aspect of the course changed your perceptions of online learning?’ an interesting theme emerged relating to the degree of dissonance that participants perceived between the activity of online blogging and their learning.  It seemed that where online blogging did not relate to participants’ personal or professional goals, the blog was seen as ‘more of a repository than an aspect of online learning’.  For another participant, a move to a new job was closely related to the insights gained through the experience of blogging: for example this participant was able to situate blogging as a register of discourse somewhere between academic writing and informal communication.  Some recounted their efforts to overcome the dissonance between their experience of the technology and their learning.  What seemed to characterise these accounts was a close observation of the distinctiveness of the exercise: the potential for immediacy and the impact of delay between responses; and the challenge of finding one’s ‘voice’ in a new medium with its own conventions and structures.  There was also a range of experiences of the relationship between online and face-to-face communication within the small groups: face-to-face communication was most often perceived as a means of facilitating online communication, for some an essential pre-requisite.  Finally, there were explorations of the range of media that could be integrated into blog-posts, though this potential wasn’t fully explored by all who found it difficult to rely exclusively on the written word.

Some comparative features of the projects: language, institutional contexts and capacities to sustain development

The previous section has given an overview of the DIAL projects within their own terms of reference.  This section attempts to draw out some comparative features of the projects: similarities and variations which be suggestive of guidance for the initiation or development of other DIAL project communities; and may illuminate how the original aim of DIAL is working in practice.   These points are intended as a starting point for discussion among current and future DIAL participants rather than as a definitive analysis.  Furthermore, I have not sought to specify ‘recommendations’ as these can be more appropriately formulated as a result of discussions among DIAL participants.

  1. The relationship between project leaders’ ‘day jobs’ and their DIAL community project varied.  Some were able to integrate projects into their existing work and into existing relationships with others. For example, Lindsay working with students on PG Cert was able to integrate the project both in terms of its substance and in terms of drawing on existing formal relationships with her students.  In contrast Laura reached across institutional boundaries to form a new relationship with a lecturer who shared a common interest, stepping both outside her job role and usual network of relationships.  Both are desirable models because they developed awareness and use of particular technologies and were conceptually transformative.  However, their different structures have different implications for resourcing and sustenance over the longer term.
  2. For all the project leaders, as for the communities they sought to engage, prioritising the work of developing digital literacy was a perennial challenge.  The expectation that work on these projects could be sustained and systematic and whilst fitting alongside existing full-time jobs resulted in some inefficiencies.  There is some evidence that this expectation results in the exclusion of all but the most passionately committed to the development of digital literacies.  Beyond the four projects that this report focuses on, there have been other potential start-ups which fell by the wayside.  Worthwhile projects were identified in January, and planning meetings took place, commitments were undertake, only to find that subsequent correspondence went unanswered.
  3. Related to the challenge set out in the previous point is another, that of sustaining a cumulative process of development within each community project and in DIAL as a whole.  Because time allocation to the project can be so piecemeal and scarce for individuals it was difficult, at times, to logically connect multiple data sets, or to make time to analyse one data set before going on to collect the next.  There is a need to follow through a process of inquiry: deciding on a question, collecting data, analysing and drawing conclusions from it before going on to collect more data or producing material.
  4. An area of expertise that some project leaders wished to develop was that of analysing data.  The challenge they faced was twofold: first they lacked experience of systematic data analysis.  This meant that they had limited awareness of the strategies open to them for analysis and were unable to foresee their options at the point of choosing samples and data collection methods.  The second challenge was of being of being close to the data, often operating within the same context as their respondents, and therefore not necessarily problematizing the familiar.
  5. There was necessarily a mix between opportunistic developmental processes and more systematic and strategic approaches.  It was not always clear whether the latter provided a context for the former or how the two related to each other.  To an uninformed outside observer initiatives can therefore appear somewhat incidental.
  6. Allied to the previous point is a larger issue of structural presentation and communication beyond DIAL’s immediate interlocutors within UAL and beyond JISC.  There is a tendency to assume a shared understanding of terminology and of decisions to change use: for example ‘open educational resources’ have at different times been called ‘open education’ and ‘open resources’.  Alongside there are the acronyms SCORE and ALTO which is also referred to as a file-store.  As well as DIAL itself, each community project has its own title.  To the uninitiated it is difficult to work out both what the terminology means and how the different elements relate to each other.
  7. It takes some time to realise that the proliferation of acronyms is rooted in the history of successive grant applications, each with their own title.  Whilst there is continuity and coherence in the developmental work that has taken place, the accumulation of acronyms gives the impression of disparate initiatives, unrelated to one another.
  8. Finally, there was a growing feeling among project leaders that DIAL’s aim to produce ‘resources’ was worth exploring.  Among some there was a transition from seeing resources as handbooks or hand-outs towards seeing them as primarily residing within the new awareness and expertise of their communities, whilst also finding expression in certain online artefacts and practices.   This is reminiscent of the last of the common characteristics of the DIAL projects: their aspiration of making use of the differing levels of expertise within their target communities.  This remains an area of potential development in the forthcoming year.

Reference

JISC e-learning and project evaluation http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearningcapital/evaluation.aspx

Posted in Activity & progress, DIAL updates, Evaluation, Interim Report | Tagged , | 5 Comments

Understanding digital literacies at UAL definitions and competencies

Understanding digital literacies at UAL definitions and competencies kick off meetings.

DIAL are address Digital literacies in its own way (sustainable community networks) this is not to say this is the only way or that we can obtain generalised definitions from general text book/web pages etc. Digital literacy means many things to many people, it is unique to individuals, groups, courses and colleges. Looking into narrower definition through research and case studies would be beneficial.

We have arranged two kick off meetings:

Thurs 14th Feb 10am - 11am (at High Holborn room TBC)

Thurs 7th March 12pm – 1pm  (at High Holborn room TBC)

Aim: To set up and establish a UAL focus group around ‘Understanding digital literacies at UAL definitions and competencies‘ The group would debate and draw up collective ideas about how best to map digital literacies across UAL as a whole with an aim of understanding how UAL communicate art specific digital literacy definitions/ideas and competencies. http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/10/30/understanding-digital-literacies-at-ual-definitions-and-competencies/

Please send these dates out to others who you think may be interested in these or future meetings. Also please add your ideas and comments to this post before we meet. If you’d like to be involved in these and/or future meeting please add a comment or email c.follows@arts.ac.uk

LOCAL COLLEGE MEETINGS

We’d like to arrange some college meetings, If you’d like to suggest a date and a venue we can start to arrange this with you?

CSM – To be confirmed

CCW – To be confirmed

LCC – To be confirmed

LCF - To be confirmed

In feedback from JISC they agree with our previous summary (interim report May 2012) that DIAL is a change programme (that we identified in the last interim report) rather than a project, this is the case with most institutional change projects and it is good to recognise this and the challenge that still exists to measure impact and outcomes across the institution. DIAL would like to try and formalise this finding as a way of looking for UAL long term funding?

The group will draw from existing digital literacy initiatives and from the JISC digital digital literacies programme findings – DL conceptual frameworks  – http://jiscdesignstudio.pbworks.com/w/page/46601840/DL%20conceptual%20frameworks  We would also like  to set up a sub group of this to address the sector skills and competencies needs.

See all-in-one digital literacy blog activity at:
http://www.netvibes.com/dialproject#UAL_digital_literacies

As part of the process we hope to debate and define UALs institutional understanding of terms associated with ‘Digital literacies’ within all aspects creative practice, including media literacies, information literacies, digital practice, digital citizenship, online identities, digital/social/cultural competencies, participatory culture, digital attributes, open practice, digital fluency etc. with an aim of publishing an ‘institutional’ evidence base of UAL glossary of terms based on an iterative process of practical, subject and interest specific case study evidence.

Also see:

Personal digital devices: researching learning – http://digitalpresent.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/11/15/personal-digital-devices-and-learning-insights/

Digital literacy within arts and design education? – http://digitalpresent.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/11/06/digital-literacy-within-arts-and-design-education/

Digital Literacy – http://digitalpresent.myblog.arts.ac.uk/digital-literacy/

POST UPDATED 31 Jan 2012

Posted in Competencies, Definitions, Digital PAT, Practice based accreditation tool | 19 Comments